Special Broadcasting Service Corporation (SBS)—Report for 2013-14 (2024)

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Special Broadcasting Service Corporation (SBS)—Report for 2013-14

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Annual Report 2014

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Contents About SBS 3

Letter to the Minister 4

SBS: Australia’s unique 6

broadcaster Organisational Structure 8

SBS Board of Directors 9

SBS Executive 12

Our Strategic Objectives 14

Year at a Glance 16

Content that explores and 18 celebrates diversity Organisation 52

Financial Statements 74

Appendices 134

Index of Annual Report 176

Requirements

2 SBS Annual Report 2014

SBS was established as an independent statutory authority on 1 January 1978 under the Broadcasting Act 1942. In 1991 the Special Broadcasting Service Act 1991 (SBS Act) came into effect and SBS became a corporation.

The Minister responsible is the Honourable Malcolm Turnbull, Minister for Communications.

During 2013-14 there was one other responsible Minister, the Honourable Anthony Albanese, Minister for Broadband, Communication and the Digital Economy (1 July to 18 September 2013).

(1) The principal function of SBS is to provide multilingual and multicultural radio, television and digital media services that inform, educate and entertain all Australians and, in doing so, refl ect Australia’s multicultural society.

(2) The SBS, in performing its principal function, must:

(a) contribute to meeting the communications needs of Australia’s multicultural society, including ethnic, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities;

(b) increase awareness of the contribution of a diversity of cultures to the continuing development of Australian society;

(c) promote understanding and acceptance of the cultural, linguistic and ethnic diversity of the Australian people;

(d) contribute to the retention and continuing development of language and other cultural skills;

(e) as far as practicable, inform, educate and entertain Australians in their preferred languages;

(f) make use of Australia’s diverse creative resources;

(g) contribute to the overall diversity of Australian television and radio services, particularly taking into account the contribution of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation and the community broadcasting sector; and

(h) contribute to extending the range of Australian television and radio services, and refl ect the changing nature of Australian society, by presenting many points of view and using innovative forms of expression.

A subsidiary function is to carry on, within or outside Australia, any business or other activity incidental to the fulfi lment of the Charter.

Charter The Charter of SBS, which sets out our principal function and duties, is contained in the SBS Act.

3

Sources 1 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Database; 5 City Metro + Combined Aggregated Regional Markets inc WA; SBS ONE, SBS 2 and NITV; 13-Jun-2014 to 14-Jul-2014; Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59; Total Individuals Inc Guests; 5 Minute Consecutive Reach; All Events containing ‘FIFA World Cup’ or ‘The Full Brazilian’; Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 2 Adobe Analytics and Google Analytics; 12/06/14 to 14/06/14; sbs.com.au and World Game FIFA World Cup Edition app.

Dear Minister

On behalf of the Board we have pleasure in presenting the Annual Report of the Special Broadcasting Service Corporation (SBS) for the year ending 30 June 2014, a period in which SBS continued to experience change in the consumption patterns of audiences and growing multicultural complexities within Australian society, against the backdrop of signifi cant international events which heightened our role in contributing to social cohesion through news and current affairs programming.

This Annual Report was approved by a resolution of directors of the Corporation on 22 August 2014, and has been prepared in accordance with the relevant requirements of the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 and the Special Broadcasting Service Act 1991 (SBS Act). It also assesses the Corporation’s performance against the goals of the new SBS Strategic Plan 2013-16.

In 2013-14, SBS brought Australians distinctive programs such as the documentary series Once Upon a Time in Punchbowl, which explored the history of the Lebanese community in Australia and how it overcame the odds to fi nd its place in our multicultural society, and SBS’s fi rst drama in four years, Better Man, which attracted broad industry acclaim. These programs exemplify the essence of the SBS Charter and speak to our multicultural society in a way no other broadcaster does. SBS also secured international drama series such as Borgen, The Killing, Fargo, Vikings and The Walking Dead, demonstrating our talents in tapping into international television trends and making those programs available to local audiences.

SBS delivered the biggest and most multi-platform coverage of a World Cup in our organisation’s history, with an integrated sports and entertainment offering across radio, television and online which sought to engage and connect all Australians with the World Cup of a lifetime. SBS’s television coverage of the 2014 FIFA World Cup reached 10.8 million Australians1, and there were 13.8 million video streams viewed online.2 Commercial teams achieved World Cup revenues in a tough advertising market and maximised return on investment for SBS.

We were incredibly proud to secure the performance of Jessica Mauboy at the 59th Eurovision Song Contest in Copenhagen after a year’s negotiations with the European Broadcasting Union and Danish Radio (DR), which culminated in the fi rst ever appearance of an Australian solo artist at Eurovision. Jessica’s performance was watched by 180 million people globally and was invaluable in showcasing Australia and the talent of our Indigenous artists to the world. This event was an execution of the SBS Charter at its best.

SBS 2 and in particular news program The Feed, continued to go from strength to strength, with a steady increase in the number of younger viewers confi rming a strategic

decision to shift the focus of our second digital channel. The Feed earned recognition for its contributions to news and current affairs, with one of its producers winning the Young Australian Journalist of the Year Award at the 2014 Walkley Awards. SBS 2 broadcast the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras, bringing it back to free to air television for the fi rst time in 12 years, secured the rights for the world’s biggest short fi lm festival Tropfest, and as home to the A-League which although faced audience challenges, continued to help grow the game in Australia.

NITV reached over two million Australians each month and in the past year has focused on commissioning a pipeline of content which speaks to its audiences, with football and children’s programming drawing industry acclaim and growing audiences. NITV news and current affairs program, Awaken, continued to carve out a voice in the mainstream media, demonstrating the channel’s unique ability to use its insights and links to Indigenous communities to impact the national conversation, and on a budget far below its fi rst nations’ broadcaster counterparts across the world.

Having implemented the fi rst new Radio Schedule in 18 years in April last year, in 2013-14 SBS Radio reviewed its program content, using audience insights and research to ensure programs delivered even more relevant content across all platforms, maximising its impact in aiding Language Other than English (LOTE) speakers to become participative members of the Australian community. SBS’s radio news coverage provided vital in-language

The Hon Malcolm Turnbull Minister for Communications Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600

4 SBS Annual Report 2014

information on national issues and events, such as the 2013 Federal Election and continued to collaborate with other content areas on major commissioned projects, such as the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2014 Eurovision Song Contest, adding depth and insights that enhanced the experience of Australia’s diverse communities.

SBS continued to cement its reputation as an industry leader in the delivery of digital services, becoming the fi rst Australian broadcaster to introduce a suite of fully responsive websites across sbs.com.au, fi lm and food websites. A focus on bringing Australian audiences distinctive content, informed by our Charter, on new media platforms delivered interactive media projects such as Exit Syria: Diaries from Za’atari, The Other 9/11, JFK: The Smoking Gun and Cronulla Riots: The Day That Shocked the Nation, which attracted industry acclaim and awards. While SBS is well-placed to leverage investment in digital content, funding of online services without compromising other core parts of the SBS offering remains a key challenge in a tight budgetary environment.

A continued focus on improving workplace culture has resulted in a signifi cant lift in measured employee morale and engagement, translating into improved performance outcomes for the organisation. Additional measures were implemented to build on SBS’s already high-performance focus, whilst the organisation participated in various government review processes, including the National Commission of Audit and ABC and SBS Effi ciency Study. These reviews were the latest opportunity for SBS to showcase to the government and its stakeholders our lean and agile operating systems and innovative culture which have evolved out of our history of being an underfunded organisation.

SBS is an effi cient, responsive and innovative media organisation which has strategically addressed the challenges and opportunities of a converged media market by playing to its strengths in the digital space with content which engages a broader cross-section of the Australian community. Our employees are highly skilled at delivering more with less, but maintaining a meaningful contribution to the Australian community with services that refl ect the

SBS Charter will be more challenging given the funding uncertainty facing SBS in 2014-15 and beyond.

In March 2014, SBS chair Joseph Skrzynski AO stepped down, having served fi ve years on the SBS Board of Directors. Joe initiated a strategic review of SBS resulting in a revitalised expression of the SBS Charter which led

to a period of transformation of the organisation in an environment of signifi cant changes in our society and in broadcast media. Elleni Bereded-Samuel also concluded a fi ve year term on the Board of Directors, contributing meaningfully towards steering the organisation in that time.

During Joe’s chairmanship, there was a major review of the SBS Radio Schedule to refl ect Australia’s changing migration patterns, extending to 74 the weekly radio in-language programs, the launch of NITV as Australia’s fi rst national free-to-air Indigenous television channel, incorporation of subscription channels World Movies and STUDIO and the relaunch of SBS 2 to bring younger Australians to SBS.

Over the past 40 years SBS has helped millions of migrants embrace their new Australian identity, and this challenge is more complex now than ever, with signifi cantly more of Australia’s migration coming from countries of non-English speaking backgrounds and of people of different faiths.

Now, more than ever, Australia must intensify its efforts to maintain our internationally envied record of success as a socially cohesive multicultural society and our position as the country of choice for skilled migrants. As such, now is the time at which SBS should be better utilised to reach multicultural communities to communicate important messages which can help prevent the fractured multiculturalism we are witnessing in some European nations.

National efforts to unify Australia’s diverse communities go directly to the reason SBS was established. Our unique capabilities in connecting multicultural communities to ensure that all Australians are, and feel included as part of our nation and importantly, understand their rights and responsibilities as Australian citizens mean we are the right tool to effectively shape our nation’s multicultural future and to drive the national discourse around what it means to be Australian today.

Yours Sincerely

Dr Bulent Hass Dellal OAM Michael Ebeid Acting Chairman Managing Director

5

Our Purpose

SBS inspires all Australians to explore, appreciate and celebrate our diverse world and in doing so, contributes to a cohesive society.

Our Goals

Goal 1: Deepen Australians’ engagement with content that refl ects our Charter

Goal 2: Grow audiences

Image: Andrew Quilty

6 SBS Annual Report 2014

SBS ONE showcases the very best of SBS content for all Australians. It delivers a unique range of commissioned and acquired shows across news, current affairs, documentaries, drama, sport, movies and entertainment. SBS ONE pushes the boundaries of Australian television to provoke debate, as well as surprising and inspiring its audiences.

SBS 2 is the home of emerging culture for a 16-39 year old Australian audience. It challenges the status quo of content across television and online; has a responsive relationship with its audience; and combines a unique Australian perspective with the best shows showcasing diversity from around the world.

NITV is Australia’s national free-to-air Indigenous television channel which brings programming produced predominantly by, for and about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to all Australians and is contributing to reconciliation in Australia.

SBS Radio is a trusted source of Australian news and information in-language, broadcasting 74 language programs on analogue, digital radio and digital television; and is the most linguistically diverse broadcaster in the world.

SBS Online is SBS’s distinctive web portal of online and mobile content which adds depth and context to the SBS television and radio offering through cross-platform programming and exclusive online projects. It is home to the SBS ON DEMAND catch-up viewing service which is available on more platforms and more devices than any other Australian catch-up service. Content is also available via consumer devices, mobile apps, paid services, and social networks.

World Movies showcases the best fi lms from across the world in over 70 languages from more than 45 countries on subscription television and is home to the iconic World Movies Secret Cinema.

STUDIO is Australia’s arts and entertainment channel showcasing the best in local and international culture on subscription television.

SBS Distribution offers SBS content to audiences through the sale of CDs, DVDs, magazines, books and online products to increase reach, deepen engagement, generate revenue and extend the SBS brand.

Our Values

Creativity Collaboration Diversity Respect Our values are central to everything we do and how we measure our success.

With a background as Australia’s multicultural broadcaster, SBS holds a unique place in the Australian media landscape.

As described in our Charter, the principal function of SBS is to provide multilingual, multicultural and Indigenous radio, television and digital media services that inform, educate and entertain all Australians and in doing so, refl ect Australia’s diverse society.

We carry out these functions through an ever-increasing number of distribution platforms, including free-to-air television channels, subscription television, analogue and digital radio, online and mobile devices and apps.

Our Offering

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* Ms Bereded-Samuel stepped down in March 2014, serving fi ve years on the SBS Board. ** Following the appointment of Helen Kellie to Chief Content Offi cer in May 2014, Amanda McGregor commenced as Director of Marketing in August 2014.

As at 30 June 2014

Minister for Communications The Hon. Malcolm Turnbull

Director Television

Tony Iffl and

NITV Channel Manager

Tanya Orman

Director Audio & Language Content

Mandi Wicks

General Manager Subscription TV

Chris Keely

Director News and Current Affairs

Jim Carroll

Head of Sport

Ken Shipp

Chief Content Offi cer

Helen Kellie**

Director Marketing

Amanda McGregor**

Director Advertising Sales

Andrew Cook

Chief Digital Offi cer

Marshall Heald

Director Technology &

Distribution

Noel Leslie

Head of Distribution

Leon

Coningham

Director Corporate Affairs

Peter Khalil

Director People & Culture

Mel Tunbridge Ken Anderson (a/g)

Chief Financial Offi cer

James Taylor

General Counsel

Lesley Power

SBS

Ombudsman

Sally Begbie

Managing Director Michael Ebeid

Community Advisory Committee

Acting Chairman Dr Bulent Hass Dellal OAM (Deputy Chairman)

Joseph Skrzynski AO stepped down as Chairman in March 2014 having served fi ve years, including four as Chair, on the SBS Board of Directors

Directors* Patricia Azarias Michael Ebeid (Managing Director) Jacqueline Hey Daryl Karp William Lenehan Dorothy West

SBS Board

8 SBS Annual Report 2014

* Joseph Skrzynski’s term ended on 26 March 2014. His last Board Meeting was on 20 February 2014. ** Elleni Bereded-Samuel’s term ended on 26 March 2014. Her last Board meeting was on 20 February 2014.

The SBS Board of Directors, consisting of the Managing Director and non-executive Directors, is responsible for deciding the objectives, strategies and policies to be followed by SBS in performing its functions. This ensures that SBS performs in a proper, effi cient and economical manner, and with the maximum benefi t to the people of Australia.

The duties of the Board, as set out in the SBS Act, are to:

- maintain the independence and integrity of SBS;

- develop and publicise SBS’s programming policies;

- ensure, by means of SBS’s programming policies, that the gathering and presentation by SBS of news and information is accurate and is balanced over time and across the schedule of programs broadcast;

- ensure that SBS does not contravene: this Act or any other Act; or any directions given to, or requirements made in relation to, SBS under this Act or another Act;

- ensure the effi cient and cost effective functioning of SBS; ensure that SBS seeks to co-operate closely with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation to maximise the effi ciency of the publicly funded sectors of Australian broadcasting;

- be aware of, and responsive to, community needs and opinions on matters relevant to the Charter;

- develop and publicise SBS’s policies on the handling of complaints;

- ensure that the pursuit by SBS of its subsidiary functions does not detract from SBS fulfi lling its Charter responsibilities;

- develop codes of practice relating to: programming matters; and, if SBS has the function of providing a datacasting service, that service; and to notify those codes to the Australian Communications and Media Authority.

Board meetings and directors’ attendance The Board met six times during 2013-14.

Board Member Meetings Attended

Joseph Skrzynski AO* (Outgoing Chairman) 4

Dr Bulent Hass Dellal OAM (Deputy Chair and Acting Chair)

5

Michael Ebeid (Managing Director) 6

Patricia Azarias 4

Jacqueline Hey 5

Daryl Karp 6

William Lenehan 6

Dorothy West 5

Elleni Bereded-Samuel** 4

Board Sitting Date Location

29 August 2013 Sydney

9 October 2013 Alice Springs

12 December 2013 Melbourne

20 February 2014 Sydney

30 April 2014 Sydney

12 June 2014 Sydney

9

Joseph Skrzynski AO Chairman to March 2014 Appointed 27 March 2009 for fi ve years, Joe has made a signifi cant contribution to the community, arts and media since 1969. He served as the Chairman of the Sydney Opera House Trust, the Australian Film Television and Radio School, and the Broadcast Council of Australia. He has been the Chief Executive of the Australian Film Commission, and a director of the National Investment Council and The Major Organisations Board of the Australia Council and is currently a director of the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney. He has extensive experience in managing private and public companies and strong expertise in fi nancial matters, including his position as Founding Partner, CHAMP Private Equity.

*Joseph Skrzynski stepped down as Chair on 26 March 2014, serving fi ve years on the SBS Board.

Dr Bulent Hass Dellal OAM Non-executive Director (Acting Chairman) Appointed 3 June 2010 for fi ve years, Dr Bulent Hass Dellal OAM has been the Executive Director of the Australian Multicultural Foundation since 1989. In addition to this work, Hass serves on the Boards of a wide

range of multicultural organisations, including as Chairman of the Centre for Multicultural Youth and of the National Centre of Excellence for Islamic Studies Consultative Committee, and Director of the Board of the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters Ltd (NAATI). Hass has also held member positions with the Multicultural Arts Advisory Council Victoria, Adult Multicultural Education Services and the Police and Community Multicultural Advisory Committee. He was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia in 1997 for service to multicultural organisations, the arts and the community.

Michael Ebeid Managing Director Michael Ebeid commenced as Managing Director of SBS in June 2011. He has over 25 years experience in senior management and executive roles across the technology, telecommunications and media industries. Under Michael’s leadership, SBS has secured the fi nancial stability and launched Australia’s fi rst national Indigenous free-to-air channel, NITV. The network has extended its reach into new digital platforms and carried out the fi rst major review in 18 years of the languages on SBS Radio. Within SBS, Michael has embarked on a workplace culture program which has signifi cantly improved measured employee morale and engagement, translating into improved performance outcomes. Prior to SBS, Michael was the Executive Director of Corporate Strategy and Marketing at the ABC and was involved in launching iView,

ABC News 24 and ABC3 for children. Before that Michael was at Optus Communications for ten years in various senior roles, and IBM for nine years where he started his career.

Patricia Azarias Non-executive Director Appointed 14 June 2006 and reappointed for another fi ve year term in 2011, Patricia Azarias is an economist and former Director of the Internal Audit Division of the United Nations, the highest ranking Australian staff member in the UN. Her previous positions include Regional General Manager, Business and Private Banking, National Australia Bank; Director, Infrastructure Funding, NSW Department of Transport (2003); Chief Executive, Ministry of Urban Infrastructure Management and Director, Infrastructure Coordination Unit in the NSW Premier’s Department (2002-03); and Director, Public Accounts Committee, Parliament of NSW (1991-2001).

Elleni Bereded-Samuel Non-executive Director Appointed 27 March 2009 for fi ve years, Elleni Bereded-Samuel is Manager of Engagement and Partnerships at Australian Unity and a Board member of Western

10 SBS Annual Report 2014

Health. Elleni has made a signifi cant contribution to the community in education, training, health and media, including as a journalist and presenter for Ethiopian Television and as Manager of Community Development with Victoria University. She has previously served on the Australian Social Inclusion Board, the Victorian Multicultural Commission, the Women’s Hospital and as past Chair of the SBS Community Advisory Committee. Elleni was made a National Diversity at work Champion for her service with culturally and linguistically diverse communities, and has been named as one of 100 Australian Women of Infl uence who are helping to change and shape Australia for a vibrant and inclusive future.

*Ms Bereded-Samuel stepped down on 26 March 2014, serving fi ve years on the SBS Board.

Jacqueline Hey Non-executive Director Appointed 30 June 2011, Jacquie Hey is also a Non-executive Director on the Boards of Bendigo & Adelaide Bank, Qantas Airways Limited, Australian Foundation Investment Company Limited, Melbourne Business School and of Cricket Australia. She is part of an External Advisory Group for ASIC and Honorary Consul for Sweden in Victoria. Previously, Jacquie was the Managing Director of Ericsson entities in Europe, Australia/New Zealand and in the Middle East and was a member of the Ericsson Global Management Team. Jacquie has a Bachelor of Commerce from the University of Melbourne, a Graduate Certifi cate in Management from

Southern Cross University and is a Graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

Daryl Karp Non-executive Director Appointed 30 June 2011, Daryl Karp is the Director of the Museum of Australian Democracy. She combines extensive experience in broadcast and digital media with a focus on content, strategy and governance. Her previous positions include CEO and Managing Director, Film Australia, Head of Factual Programs (Television) at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), and Head of Science and Documentaries/ Science and Features at the ABC. She is a director of the Australian Children’s Television Foundation and Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

Dorothy West Non-executive Director Appointed 15 November 2012, Dot West has a long media history within the Kimberley and has played a major role in the training and development of Indigenous media nationally. Dot brings to the industry her skills in media, management and facilitation capabilities to assist in the vision of Indigenous media playing an intricate role in communications and

the arts within the region and across the nation. Dot has served as the Inaugural Vice Chairperson of NITV, Screenwest, Australian International Documentary Conference and the National Indigenous Radio Service including her current tenure as a Director of Goolarri Media Enterprises in Broome, Ramu Productions and the Pilbara and Kimberley Aboriginal Media Association. Dot works freelance as a scriptwriter and consultant in Indigenous media.

William Lenehan Non-executive Director Appointed on 15 November 2012, Bill Lenehan has 35 years’ experience in the television industry in Australia, holding many positions in the Ten Network from management, administration and broadcast operations. He currently runs his own consulting business, Bilinda Pty Ltd, specialising in media, marketing and business administration. Bill has held previous board positions with the National Australia Day Council, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, The Queensland Harness Racing Board and ThoroughVision Pty Ltd.

11

* Ken became Director of Sport in August 2014, previously he was Head of Sport. Absent: Peter Khalil, Director, Corporate Affairs.

Michael Ebeid Managing Director and Chief Executive Offi cer

Mandi Wicks Director, Audio & Language Content

Noel Leslie Director, Technology & Distribution

James Taylor Chief Financial Offi cer

Ken Shipp Director of Sport*

Andrew Cook Director, Advertising Sales

12 SBS Annual Report 2014

Lesley Power General Counsel

Tony Iffl and Director, Television

Jim Carroll Director, News and Current Affairs

Helen Kellie Chief Content Offi cer

Marshall Heald Chief Digital Offi cer

13

This Annual Report reviews SBS’s performance against the SBS Strategic Plan 2013-16, and the Australian Government’s Portfolio Budget Statement and Portfolio Additional Estimates Statement for 2013-14.

SBS Purpose Our purpose is to inspire all Australians to explore, appreciate and celebrate our diverse world and by doing so, contribute to a cohesive society.

The social and technological environment SBS participates in is changing. This in turn infl uences our strategy, how we operate and how we achieve our purpose.

Our Challenges

Convergence

Media convergence is disrupting established business models, industry structures, organisational frameworks and public policy settings

Digital delivery

Costs associated with digital platform development and content delivery are steadily increasing with consumer demand

Production and acquisition costs

To feed the increasing demand for content by audiences, there are implications for acquisition and commissioning costs

Cultural complexity

There are twice as many Language Other than English (LOTE) speakers than 30 years ago and the number and range of cultures is also greater

The way we work

As technology changes, SBS must continue to review and evolve the way we work and ensure our working environment matches our focus on collaboration and creativity

Our Opportunities

Digital platforms

New digital platforms present opportunities for SBS to deliver tailored content to our audiences and develop strong brand relationships with consumers

Challenging topics and content

Our unique position in the industry allows us to present compelling, distinctive and thought-provoking content for our audiences

In-language services

Our ability to develop and/or repurpose LOTE content presents a number of commercial opportunities

Australian content

Our insights and links to Australia’s multicultural and Indigenous communities positions us to commission distinctive Australian content for domestic and international markets

14 SBS Annual Report 2014

The SBS Strategic Plan 2013-16 delivers on its goals and objectives by developing and growing in fi ve key areas:

1 Distinctive content - Deliver content that drives both audience growth and distinctiveness.

- Lead the national discourse on multicultural and Indigenous issues through Charter inspired commissioned content.

- Create distinctive commissioned content that truly refl ects Australia’s diverse multicultural and Indigenous society.

- Accelerate our investment in content areas where SBS has strength and distinctiveness.

- Evolve our language offering across all platforms to meet the demands of the largest language groups and those groups with highest needs.

- Continue to invest in content that attracts and retains younger audiences.

2 People - Develop a high-performance, team-based culture.

- Continue to invest in our leaders to build the skills we need to adapt to the new media landscape.

3 Capabilities - Continue to develop our ability to deliver SBS content to our audiences as they migrate to

new digital platforms.

- Pursue greater integration and simplifi cation of workfl ows and processes to improve organisational effectiveness and our ability to respond to the changing demands of audiences.

- Create a physical work environment suited to a contemporary, multiplatform, audience-orientated media organisation.

4 Commercial - Grow our commercial revenue for further investment in content.

- Pursue an expansion of our commercial offering in areas where we can provide partners with a distinctive proposition.

5 Stakeholders - Advance our stakeholder relationships to encourage effective exchange between

SBS and our industry, multicultural and Indigenous community stakeholders.

- Deliver on stakeholder expectations to justify support and adequate funding.

The SBS Board identifi ed the following strategic priorities for SBS Corporation for the period 2013-16.

Goal 1 To deepen Australians’ engagement with content that refl ects our Charter Objectives To be a catalyst for the national discussion about multiculturalism and social inclusion.

To create more multicultural, multilingual and Indigenous Australian content.

To increase the range and quality of multilingual services across all platforms.

Goal 2 To grow audiences Objectives For more Australians to use SBS services.

For Australians who use SBS services to use more of them and more often.

For more Australians of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) backgrounds to use and value SBS language services.

SBS Strategic Plan 2013-16

15

Sources 1 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA; SBS ONE, SBS 2 and NITV; 01/07/013-30/06/2014 Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59; Total Individuals Inc Guests; Cume ATS View, Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 2 Nielsen SiteCensus Streaming (Jul-2012 to Dec-2013), Adobe Analytics (SBS Production Jan-2014 to Jun-2014), All In Mobile (Jul-2012 to Jun-2014), TuneIn Radio (Mar-2014 to Jun-2014); SBS; Total Live and Catch-Up Audio Streams. 3 MPX Total Requests , Nielsen SiteCensus, On, Xbox Server Logs, Sony Bravia Server Logs, iTunes, Bigpond TV and Fairfax Digital, YouTube; Adobe Analytics, FIFA World Cup MatchCentre and Web app. 4 OzTAM, 5 City Metro; SBS TTL (SBS ONE, SBS 2 and NITV); 01/07/13 to 30/06/14; Sun-Sat 18:00-24:00; Total Individuals; FTA Share; Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV).

Year at a Glance Goal 1

Deepen Australians’ engagement with content that refl ects our Charter

hours of fi rst run local content across television, including news and current affairs and sport on SBS ONE, SBS 2 and NITV

hours of locally commissioned broadcast fi rst run on SBS ONE, SBS 2 and NITV

SB BS S pr pr p od oduc ced e 2014 FIFA FA W W W Wor o ld ld C Cup u co c m mm me en n e ta ary r in n 15 la angu uag ge ge es, s m morre than an n a y y otthe er r br b o oadc dcaster gl gl g ob obally ly h ha as as a d del e iv ver e ed in in W W Wor o ld d C Cu up p u h histo ory

SBS viewers spent an average of 304 minutes viewing SBS programs each month, a 2.4 per cent increase on 2012-131

of radio broadcasts were in languages other than English, almost 10 per cent above target

SBS delivered over 450,000 live streams of radio content each month, up 22.8 per cent on 2012-132

hours of television programs were subtitled across SBS’s free-to-air television channels

of television content in a language other than English comprised the SBS ONE schedule and 65 per cent of the SBS 2 schedule

The average number of SBS video views served to audiences each month on SBS and third-party platforms doubled from just under 4 million in 2012-13 to almost 7.6 million3

16 SBS Annual Report 2014

5 Nielsen Online Ratings ‐ Hybrid; SBS; 01-Jul-2012 to 30-Jun-2014; All People 2+; Average Monthly Unique Audience. 6 McNair Ingenuity Research. Media Consumption Research Amongst Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Peoples. May 2014. 7 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 01/07/2012-30/06/2014, People 0-15, People 16-39 and People 40-54 Inc Guests; SBS 2, Sun-Sat 18:00-23:59, Audience Variation, Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 8 Nielsen SiteCensus Streaming, Adobe Analytics, All In Mobile, TuneIn Radio; Google Feedburner; Average Monthly; Unique Browsers includes sbs.com.au/yourlanguage, /chinese, / popasia, /poparaby, /popdesi, /lunarnewyear, /podcasts, /chill and /radio.

Goal 2

Grow audiences

m m m m m m m

An average of 12.5 million Australians watched SBS television each month1

SBS.com.au’s average monthly unique audience grew to 1.2 million, a 17 per cent increase5

SBS became available to an additional 130,000 Australians across regional areas through the biggest expansion of the network since its establishment with the addition of 52 new sites

SBS Radio websites showed an increase of 23 per cent for live audio streams8

m

Over 700 hours of television coverage of the 2014 FIFA World cup in June and July 2014 reached 10.8 million Australians1

iin n n n

More than 2 million Australians watched NITV each month and nine in 10 Indigenous Australians have watched it6

SBS 2’s average evening audiences grew by 65 per cent for viewers aged 16-19 7

5.4% SBS had a metro share of 5.4 per cent in 2013-144

Video on demand downloads increased from an average of 14,500 per month to 27,800 per month, an increase of over 90 per cent on 2012-13

17

In this section SBS United: 2014 FIFA World Cup 20 SBS ONE 24

SBS 2 26

NITV grows on free to air 28

television Audiences feel at home 30

on SBS Radio Online delivers record growth 32 News and Current Affairs 35

becomes One Newsroom Sport on SBS brings 38

Australians together Every night is food night 40

Documentaries remain 42

a Charter pillar Charter inspires unique 44

comedy and entertainment The best movies from 48

across the world Subscription Television 49

Engaging our Audiences 51

18 SBS Annual Report 2014

“Australia is the most successful multicultural country in the world… in a large part because of the commitment SBS has made. SBS is part of the glue… that binds our multicultural society together.”

- The Hon. Malcolm Turnbull, Minister for Communications, November, 2013.

19

The 2014 FIFA World Cup Final match had a peak audience of 1.8 million viewers, with a combined average audience 15.3 per cent higher than that achieved by the Final of the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa.10

20 SBS Annual Report 2014

Sources 10 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional Inc WA, SBS ONE, 11/06/2010 to 12/07/2010 and 15/07/2014 Total Individuals Including Guests, AUD, Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 11 Adobe Analytics and Google Analytics; 12-Jun-2014 to 14-Jul-2014; sbs.com.au and World Game FIFA World Cup Edition Mobile app. Downloads Source: iTunes via App Annie, Google Play and Samsung Apps as of 16-Jul-2014. 12 Twitter, June 2014.

SBS brought Australians together for the 2014 FIFA World Cup, celebrating football and diversity through the biggest, best and most multi-platform coverage of the world’s pinnacle sporting event.

Building on 24 years of World Cup broadcasting, SBS united to deliver a major World Cup offering to Australians, with a full suite of coverage across television, radio, online, mobile, tablet and social media.

The Socceroos vs Chile match outstripped ratings for all previous games from the 2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa, securing an audience average of 2.3 million.10 SBS aired all 64 matches live across its channels and in High Defi nition, with the broadcast team delivering over 700 hours of television coverage and reaching 10.8 million Australians across the tournament.10

SBS Radio offered commentary in 15 languages, the most ever delivered by a broadcaster in World Cup history. There were over 13 million video streams viewed and the SBS World Cup app was downloaded more than 400,000 times.11

The 2014 FIFA World Cup generated extraordinarily high engagement with viewers on social media, with football fans around the world sending 672 million tweets related to the #WorldCup, including 35.6 million tweets for the semi-fi nal match between Brazil and Germany - the most-discussed sports game ever on Twitter.12

The World Cup Show was presented nightly from Rio de Janeiro by SBS football experts Les Murray and Craig Foster, including cultural aspects of the event presented by new SBS talent Fernanda de Paula.

SBS also broadcast a daily morning news show on SBS ONE, a dedicated Socceroos show each evening, match of the day replays on SBS and NITV, as well as the nightly entertainment show, The Full Brazilian, on SBS ONE.

This in-depth football coverage, along with complementary content from SBS food, fi lm and documentary programming, provided Australian audiences with a rich and informative taste of the world’s most popular sporting event, whilst allowing SBS to showcase its broader network offering to a large audience.

SBS advertising and In-Language revenue experienced 27 per cent growth year-on-year, largely infl uenced by the success of the FIFA World Cup and other key football events including the A-League. Television sales increased by 28 per cent, online sales by 34 per cent and radio achieved growth by 20 per cent against 2012-13.

21

13 Adobe Analytics and Google Analytics; 12-Jun-2014 to 14-Jul-2014; sbs.com.au and World Game FIFA World Cup Mobile app. 14 Adobe Analytics and Google Analytics, Football Streams, 12-Jun-2014 to 14-Jul-2014, measures sbs.com.au, SBS ON DEMAND and the World Game FIFA World Cup Edition mobile app, All Football Streams, Page and Screen Views. 15 iTunes via App Annie, Google Play and Samsung Apps.

S SBS U Un U ited d: 2014 F FIFA A Wo W W rld Cu up

The Full Brazilian Commissioned by SBS as part of the broader World Cup content offering, The Full Brazilian was a nightly prime-time entertainment show, hosted by comedian Jimeoin. Filmed in front of a live studio audience, it presented the lighter side of the World Cup, exploring the latest football headlines through sketches and in-studio challenges, with celebrity interviews and music acts.

SBS Radio SBS Radio’s broadcast of the 2014 FIFA World Cup was a world fi rst, with live commentary and analysis of every match in 15 languages - more than any other broadcaster in the world - plus comprehensive news coverage across SBS’s 74 language programs. The radio team put 360 hours of football to air, increasing audience engagement with SBS Radio through the world’s most popular sporting event. Each match was broadcast live and in at least two languages, including English, plus one of the offi cial languages of the competing countries’ teams, across analogue and digital radio, online, and the SBS Radio app. SBS Radio also launched a pop-up digital radio channel, SBS PopBrazil, to deliver a cultural and musical offering to a wider audience through modern Brazilian hit music.

SBS Radio also engaged directly with audiences through a dedicated SBS Radio World Cup events team, attending over 30 live match community events in Sydney and Melbourne to promote the network coverage and provide content for other SBS teams including the news team.

“Part travelogue, part cultural diary … This is Brazil! is an entertaining adventure through one of the world’s most diverse and delightful countries.” - TV Week.

This is Brazil! This is Brazil!, a six-part documentary series hosted by Fernanda de Paula, showcased the vibrant colour and cultural diversity of the 12 capital cities in Brazil that played host to the 2014 FIFA World Cup. Fernanda, a Brazilian-born Australian, explored daily life in Brazil, through the eyes of local chefs, musicians, artists and everyday workers - giving Australian audiences a taste of the real Brazil ahead of the World Cup. The series was well-received by audiences and media as a light and colourful accompaniment to SBS’s World Cup football programming.

Content Outreach Extending SBS’s impact beyond the television screen, the SBS Content Outreach team partnered with Football Federation Australia (FFA) and the Australian Government to produce the Harmony Game Schools Pack. Delivered to every primary school across Australia and available online, the resource teaches children the value of diversity, through the medium of the world game, football. Content Outreach initiatives such as this are a unique element of SBS’s network offering and an example of the valuable role SBS plays in contributing to social cohesion, by encouraging Australians to explore and celebrate our diverse world.

Technical Support Behind the scenes, delivering the 2014 FIFA World Cup from across the globe to a national audience was a huge achievement by SBS’s technical team. The broadcast operations team supported extensive on-ground coverage from Brazil and over 300 hours of studio based programming, including live match hosting and a nightly entertainment program. Over 20 major technology systems were also refreshed or replaced in the lead up to the tournament.

Distribution SBS Distribution delivered a range of products and events to align with World Cup coverage. A World Cup theatrical deal put live games in cinemas across the country and SBS secured a new magazine partnership with Next Media for the SBS Comprehensive Guide to 2014 FIFA World Cup.

22 SBS Annual Report 2014

World Cup video streams were viewed13

“I cannot fault SBS at all for the entire duration of the 2014 World Cup. Whether I was watching matches replayed on TV in the offi ce, from under the bedcovers at 5AM on my tablet, or on my phone on the train through a Wi-Fi hotspot, the video coverage was top-notch. No match-breaking glitches, no drop-outs, and adaptive streaming that actually worked. YouTube could learn a thing or two from SBS. Bravo, guys. Bravo.” - Gizmodo.

SBS Online SBS Online developed an innovative and ambitious World Cup offering with the Sport team in 2014. The World Game website, a fully responsive web experience, along with the iOS and Android apps, provided the most interactive multiscreen coverage of any sporting event ever seen in Australia. Features included boosted video bit-rates, goal tracking, Fantasy Football and

Tipping games, and an interactive video player allowing for multi-angle live streaming, full replays and social sharing.

With all matches available through live streaming, SBS experienced record-breaking video traffi c and set a new benchmark for sports coverage in this country. There were 13.8 million video streams viewed,13 and SBS’s audience viewed more than 50 million

pages of World Cup content across its platforms,14 while the World Game FIFA World Cup Edition Mobile app was downloaded more than 400,000 times.15

Feedback SBS received for its online coverage has been overwhelmingly positive, with the quality of the offering refl ected in the level of audience traffi c during the tournament.

“SBS has changed its formats and personnel over the years, but it continues to present an admirably thorough and professional World Cup that puts many more well-resourced channels in other countries to shame.” - The Guardian.

23

Sources 1 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 25/07/2013 to 09/02/2014, Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS ONE, Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59, Cume Reach (5 mins cons), Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 2 OzTAM Metro Database, 08/08/2013 to 01/10/2013, Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS ONE, Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59, FTA Share %, Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 3 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 01/07/2013 to 30/06/2014, Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS ONE, SBS 2 and NITV, Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59, Monthly Cume Reach (5 mins cons), Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 4 June 2013 = On Demand Events Tracking via SiteCensus + Xbox Server Logs + 3rd party stats supplied by Sony Bravia, Fairfax Digital, YouTube, iTunes and Bigpond TV; June 2014 = Adobe Omniture (SBS Production) + Xbox Server Logs + YouTube + Google Analytics ‐ The World Game and Google Analytics ‐ World Cup app.

In 2013-14 SBS ONE showcased the very best of SBS content - informing, educating and entertaining Australians with distinctive programs that are unique to SBS and refl ect its special Charter to explore and celebrate diversity.

With a range of commissioned and acquired shows that only SBS can deliver - from daring documentaries and dramas, to in-depth and award-winning news and current affairs, to the biggest sporting events bringing the nation together in celebration - SBS ONE pushed the boundaries of Australian television to provoke debate and inspire its audiences.

Ground-breaking documentaries like Once Upon a Time in Punchbowl and Australia’s Secret Heroes, informed by the SBS Charter, spoke to a diverse Australian audience and brought untold stories to life on screen. Communities deepened their understanding of national and international issues with expert news and current affairs coverage.

The 2014 FIFA World Cup - the biggest in the organisation’s history - was the centrepiece of sport on SBS ONE, alongside other standouts including the Tour de France. SBS food programming went from strength to strength as the network continued to develop a following in this genre, driven by its point of difference in exploring the cultures behind the cuisines.

SBS ONE cemented its reputation for international movies which refl ect the diversity of people and cultures across the world. Comedies such as Legally Brown and Logie award-winning Housos pushed the boundaries with a unique style of humour, while Eurovision offered viewers a true entertainment experience with social media integration on-screen.

In a competitive market the network’s reach remained level year-on-year and SBS ONE programs received industry recognition including several nominations at the 2014 TV Week Logie Awards.

Key events and programs across the SBS ONE schedule, including the 2014 FIFA World Cup, also infl uenced signifi cant growth across all sales platforms, with SBS advertising and In-Language revenue experiencing 27 per cent growth year on year.

Better Man SBS broadcast its fi rst commissioned drama in four years with Better Man, a powerful mini-series depicting the story of Van Nguyen, the last Australian to be executed by a foreign government following his arrest for drug traffi cking in Singapore. The series reached 1.4 million viewers1 and received critical acclaim, including three TV Week Logie Award nominations, with lead actor Remy Hii winning a Graham Kennedy Award for Most Outstanding Newcomer.

Acquired Drama Drama was successfully integrated into the SBS ONE schedule in 2013-14 with a premium English language drama slot on Thursday nights, including acquired series Vikings, Masters of Sex and Fargo. This complemented major LOTE dramas such as Borgen, The Bridge, Prisoners of War and Lillehammer, together generating a great amount of publicity and building on SBS’s strong programming reputation.

Vikings, loosely based on real life historical events and starring Australian actors Travis Fimmel and Alyssa Sutherland, was extremely popular with SBS audiences. Season 1 achieved a metro free-to-air share on SBS ONE of 11.6 per cent,2 while Season 2 was the most popular series on record for SBS ON DEMAND. The highest reaching months for drama were August 2013, with a reach of almost 4 million, and May 2014, with a reach of 4.1 million - driven by Vikings Season 1 and 2 respectively.3

24 SBS Annual Report 2014

Focus on Food SBS ONE continued to take audiences on an exploration of the world’s cultures through food. Commissioned programs such as Peter Kuruvita’s Mexican Fiesta, Destination Flavour Japan hosted by Adam Liaw, and Luke Nguyen’s France resonated with audiences. This year SBS ONE also had two stand-out acquisitions, Heston’s Fantastical Feasts and Little Paris Kitchen.

Movies SBS ONE encourages Australians to explore the world of cinema, with its distinctive collection of independent and international movies, and the continuation of the regular fi lm slot on Saturday nights hosted by arts commentator and journalist Sandy George. This was boosted by a number of themed fi lm seasons, including the Aussie Film Season that aired over the summer, and the Kung Fu season which formed part of a multi-channel offering to deepen engagement with audiences.

News and Current Affairs SBS ONE continued to deliver high quality, in-depth news and current affairs, across SBS World News, Dateline, Insight and Living Black, bringing audiences a greater depth and range of perspectives on key international and domestic issues and events (see pages 35-37). Tuesday nights on SBS ONE featured tent pole programs Insight and Dateline in prime time, back to back after the early evening World News bulletin.

Audiences SBS ONE continued to face tough competition in 2013-14 in a fragmenting media landscape where convergence and the availability of online and catch-up services on multiple devices have changed audience viewing habits. For SBS ONE, Monday evenings experienced a year-on-year audience increase of 2.1 per cent after the addition of Mythbusters, Vikings and RocKwiz to the evening. Other evening ratings showed varying decline, but occurred in conjunction with a record year of growth for SBS on its digital platform, with a surge in online video views which grew from 5 million in June 2013 to over 17 million in June 2014.4

year-on-year growth for SBS Advertising and In-Language revenue

SBS ONE: Average Evening Audience (000s) By Day of Week - 2012-13 v 2013-14 Combined Metro + Regional

FY2012-13 FY2013-14 % Change

Sun-Sat Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

300

250

200

150

100

50

242

221

256

234

194 198

270

227

239

216

259

248

257

208

220 216

-8.7% -8.6% 2.1% -15.9% -9.6% -4.2% -19.1% -1.8%

25

The A-League SBS 2 broadcast the domestic A-League - the fi rst time it has been available to Australian audiences on free to air television since the competition’s inception. The A-League attracted wider audiences with cross-platform coverage including television, radio, online and mobile (see page 38).

Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras In 2014, SBS 2 brought the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras back to free to air television for the fi rst time in 12 years. Hosts Patrick Abboud of SBS 2’s The Feed, comedian Tom Ballard, and Scottish actor and musician Heather Peace, showcased the best of the parade - from spectacular fl oats and outrageous costumes, to a variety of feature reports and vignettes giving audiences insightful back stories about the individuals and organisations taking part.

For the fi rst time, 100 SBS employees were given the opportunity to take part in a Mardi Gras fl oat which paid homage to iconic SBS World News presenter Lee Lin Chin and celebrated the role the organisation plays, not only in exploring multiculturalism, but in refl ecting and celebrating diversity in all its forms.

SBS 2’s coverage of the Mardi Gras reached 580,000 Australians1 and SBS received praise and recognition from audiences about its coverage.

www.sbs.com.au/sydney-gay-and-lesbian-mardi-gras/

To promote the broadcast of the parade on SBS 2, SBS Online developed a website which attracted 14,000 unique visitors in the week

Sources 1 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 02/03/2014 to 09/03/2014, Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS 2, Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59, Cume Reach (5 mins cons), Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 2 Adobe Analytics, 01-Mar-2014 to 31-May-2014. 3 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 01/10/2013 to 30/06/2014, Total Individuals Inc Guests; SBS 2, Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59, Monthly Cume Reach (5 mins cons), Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV).

SBS 2 marked a year since relaunching as a younger channel in April 2013, with the channel continuing to attract younger audiences to SBS.

Broadcasts of the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras, Tropfest and the A-League’s home on the channel delivered audiences above 200,000 for the fi rst time and built on SBS 2’s reputation as the destination for younger Australians to access diverse content from across the world.

A focus on international movies and drama also contributed to network growth, with many cult classics featuring on the weekly schedule and attracting a strong following.

Strategic narrative repeats and encore screenings from SBS ONE allowed the network to benefi t from the popularity of the main channel and increase awareness of SBS 2.

The Feed The Feed continues to earn industry recognition for its contributions to news and current affairs in an accessible format, earning multiple industry accolades and driving new media debate. In 2014 the program was extended from 15 minutes to 30 minutes, with an average of 872,000 unique viewers tuning in per month.3

prior and following the event, including international traffi c (approx. 25 per cent) from UK, other parts of Europe and the United States.2 The home page included an international live stream (and catch up) of the event, but largely served to sign post people into other parts of the SBS network for great diverse content relevant to the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) community. SBS Online made use of its social capabilities using ‘Mass Relevance’ and ‘Never No’ for the social TV broadcast and featured a gallery, map and support messages on the site.

26 SBS Annual Report 2014

4 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Inc WA, SBS 2; 29/04/2014 to 24/06/2014, Sun-Sat 18:00-23:59, Total Individuals Inc Guests, Cume Reach (5 mins cons) and Metro FTA Share , Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). Source: Nielsen SiteCensus and Adobe Analytics; 1-Jul-2013 to 30-Jun-2014. 5 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 01/07/2012-30/06/2014, People 0-15, People 16-39 and People 40-54 Inc Guests; SBS 2, Sun-Sat 18:00-23:59, Audience Variation, Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV).

zombie series The Returned which ranked seventh in Fairfax’s Top 10 Dramas for 2013. It also featured Orphan Black, fast-tracked from the United States with a combined television audience of 79,000 and 268,000 online catch up views.4

Movie Mayhem Movies are now a central part of the SBS 2 schedule with Marc Fennell hosting ‘Movie Mayhem’ nights featuring cult, action, thriller and horror movies from around the world. SBS 2 has also run successful week long mini seasons ‘Monster Mayhem’ and ‘B Movie Mayhem’ that have shown great appeal with younger audiences.

Back2Back on SBS 2 In a fi rst for Australian broadcasting, SBS 2 provided Back2Back episode viewing via SBS ON DEMAND. This fl exible approach to content delivery allows viewers to watch all the episodes of a series at their own leisure as soon as the fi rst episode is broadcast on television. In 2013-14 greater focus was given to ensuring online stacking rights were secured upfront for key series.

SBS 2 Combined Metro + Regional Evening Average Audience5

Viewers aged 0-15 Ó 64.5% Viewers aged 16-39 Ó 65.2% Viewers aged 40-54 Ó 11.1%

PopAsia SBS PopAsia television showcased the hottest Asian Pop artists in 2013-14 and leveraged the multi-platform brand’s strength in social media by introducing live on-screen tweets and Facebook posts. The program is a fl agship for Asian pop-culture on SBS 2 and is recognised as one of the top 10 Australian Radio brands on social media.

If You Are The One A fantastic window into the culture of young Chinese in their home country, If You Are The One is China’s biggest entertainment show and a new acquisition for SBS 2. The program has now found a regular home at 7.30pm on weekends, continuing to attract a strong loyal audience to set up the evening.

“It is a show that’s crazy in that marvellous way TV from Asia achieves effortlessly and western TV so rarely can. The garish spectacle - the lights, the music, the roaring audience, the gleaming silver set. I recommend you fl ick over to SBS 2 to catch it.” - The Age.

If You Are The One has prompted signifi cant social media activity, with fans intrigued by the cultural differences explored through the program, the quirky nature of the show, and the earnestness of the contestants.

‘Bite Nite’ The introduction of a Tuesday ‘Bite Nite’ line-up featuring supernatural and fantasy-based premium dramas has broadened the appeal of SBS 2 and established a dedicated audience for the channel. The line-up included SBS 2’s fi rst LOTE drama, the critically acclaimed French

27

Sources 1 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 01/04/2013 to 30/06/2014, Total Individuals Inc Guests, NITV, Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59, Monthly Cume Reach (5 mins cons), Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 2 McNair Ingenuity Research. Media Consumption Research Amongst Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Peoples. May 2014. 3 McNair Ingenuity Research. Media Consumption Research Amongst Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Peoples. May 2014.

NITV continued to grow and evolve as a free to air channel following its successful transition to SBS in 2012 and free to air launch.

In 2013-14 NITV focused on commissioning content valued by its audiences, reaching an average of over 2 million Australians each month.1 Research shows that 95 per cent of Indigenous audiences regard NITV as a trusted source of news about Indigenous issues, while 97 per cent agree that NITV makes them feel proud of their Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.2

NITV maintains editorial responsibility within SBS and channel content is primarily commissioned or acquired from the Indigenous production sector. News and current affairs, sport, documentaries, entertainment programs and dedicated children’s shows feature on the weekly schedule.

News and Current Affairs NITV presents news stories through a unique Indigenous lens with live NITV News every weekday, News in Review on weekends and fl agship current affairs program Awaken. SBS has benefi ted from a strong relationship with the channel with cross-programming ensuring key Indigenous content achieved broader audience reach.

NITV News Broadcasting live from both the SBS studio and the heart of Indigenous communities, NITV News demonstrated its unique access and insights into the stories of Indigenous Australians, securing a number of national exclusives followed by other media outlets.

Awaken Hosted by renowned journalist Stan Grant, Awaken presented a range of informed perspectives and debates including a forum on Constitutional Recognition.

Documentary NITV continued to showcase quality documentaries, including From the Western Frontier, Colour Theory and The Tipping Points, which highlighted the rich history, art and culture of Indigenous peoples and analysed Indigenous rights and environmental issues around the world.

From the Western Frontier was a new partnership between NITV and ScreenWest and provided Indigenous Western Australian fi lmmakers an opportunity to showcase extraordinary home-grown documentaries about defi ning moments in history on national television which aired during Reconciliation Week 2014 programming.

Children’s Content NITV broadcasts approximately seven hours of children’s programming daily and remains a content priority. Programs supported the development of literacy, languages and numeracy skills while fostering the cultural identity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people.

Jarjums is NITV’s dedicated children’s program slot, featuring fun and educational Indigenous and First Peoples’ content from Australia and around the world. The Jarjums timeslot includes a line-up of Indigenous shows for young children through to teenagers, with well-known NITV commissions Waabiny Time, Yarramundi Kids, Cool Schools Antarctica, and the Deadly Award-winning and Logie-nominated dance-based fi tness show Move It Mob Style.

Film NITV showcased Australian and international Indigenous fi lm through programming seasons ‘The BlackList’ and ‘Africa Season’, including Walkabout, Blackfellas and Ten Canoes. The curated fi lm seasons boosted NITV’s varied weekly schedule to deliver a record monthly reach for the channel with a peak of over 2.5 million in May and June 2014.1

International The NITV acquisitions team continued efforts to build and maintain key networks with producers and distributors globally to bring Australians insights into Indigenous content from across the world which delivered some of NITV’s highest ratings.

96 per cent of Indigenous Australians over 18 are aware of NITV and nine in ten have watched it.3

28 SBS Annual Report 2014

Sport NITV has a longstanding commitment to championing grassroots sports and brings audiences events that have never before aired on Australian television. In 2013-14 sport on NITV took its audiences into the heart of Indigenous communities to promote physical education, sport and recreation, which play a key role in developing children’s intellectual, social, emotional and physical skills.

NITV commissioned The Marngrook Footy Show, the channel’s fl agship sport program consistently delivered strong audiences. NITV brought audiences its most extensive coverage of the NSW Koori Knockout Rugby League Carnival with record viewers tuning into the fi nals.

NITV also delivered special broadcasts of basketball, cricket, netball, touch football and rugby union.

Commissioned Content NITV commissions showcased Indigenous Australian food, dance, art, documentary and entertainment programming. In a fi rst for Kriol cuisine, Kriol Kitchen celebrated the infl uences of Asian food, culture and history on local Broome cuisine across a 10-part series.

NITV paid tribute to the military efforts of the Indigenous peoples of Australia with a special commissioned series, ANZAC: Remembering Our Heroes, which aired during ANZAC Week. The series of home-grown documentaries highlighted 10 Indigenous stories from across the land through touching personal accounts and family memories.

Supporting the Indigenous Production Sector

NITV invests almost three quarters of its budget into content production, working with more than 100 Indigenous productions throughout the year to provide editorial guidance, support and funding to the Indigenous production sector.

The Regional, Remote and Emerging Initiative remains a key part of NITV’s programming strategy and delivered signifi cant content from regional and remote Australia.

Our Stories, Our Way Every Day is a landmark mini documentary series supported by State Screen Agencies and training institutions to produce a series of digital stories from Indigenous communities.

Around the Traps, hosted by acclaimed journalist Allan Clarke and broadcaster Mayrah Sonter, is a monthly arts and entertainment show featuring regional and remote reporters who feed in stories from the heart of their communities.

29

Sources 1 Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing, 2011. 2 Adobe Analytics (SBS Production), All In Media, TuneIn Radio, Total Audio Streams, Jun-2014. 3 YouTube as of 30-Jun-2014. 4 YouTube Analytics, Financial Year 2013/14 vs Financial Year 2012/13, channel=sbspopasia.

SBS Radio is the world’s most linguistically diverse radio network, broadcasting 74 language programs and four dedicated digital music channels in 2013-14. With Australia now home to four million people who speak a language other than English (LOTE) at home,1 SBS Radio remains a vital and trusted source for Australian news and information in-language.

SBS Radio language programs are available on analogue and digital radio, digital television, online and through the SBS Radio mobile app.

Audio & Language Content (ALC) Review Following the launch of the new SBS Radio Schedule in 2013, SBS reviewed its radio program content throughout 2013-14 to deepen engagement and grow audiences by delivering more tailored content. Using data from the 2011 Census, commissioned audience research and direct community feedback, audience profi les were created to explore each language community’s characteristics and media usage.

Support of SBS Hero Commissions Football SBS Radio’s dedicated A-league team provided detailed match commentary and analysis for every Friday night match of the 2013-14 A-League season, including live stadium broadcasts of the fi nal series. Each match was broadcast on digital radio, online and via the SBS Radio app.

SBS’s language programs provided comprehensive coverage of the 2014 FIFA World Cup, with live commentary of all 64 matches in two languages and 28 Outside Broadcasts at community screenings (see Appendix 20). The SBS Radio language website broke all records with over 1.1 million stream requests for ALC live and on demand content in June.2

2014 Eurovision Song Contest Pop-up station SBS Eurovision Radio offered audiences a non-stop soundtrack to the celebration and was used to cross promote SBS’s multi-platform Eurovision programming. Interviews were conducted in over 33 languages to engage listeners with the latest Eurovision events while SBS Eurovision Radio simulcast all four of the semi-fi nals and fi nal broadcasts.

2013 Federal Election and the SBS Election Exchange SBS Radio’s coverage of the 2013 Federal Election campaign focussed on marginal seats with a high proportion of people who speak a language other than English at home. Complementing the 380 news stories in SBS Radio’s news bulletins, were approximately 110 audio features produced on party policy, leader and features dedicated to teaching listeners the basics of Australia’s electoral system.

SBS Radio hosted seven bilingual Election Exchange voter forums in Sydney and Melbourne with the six largest language programs (Arabic, Cantonese, Greek, Italian, Mandarin and Vietnamese). The forums brought constituents, local members and candidates together for a positive discussion about election issues.

SBS PopAsia and new content initiatives SBS PopAsia commissioned two new weekly radio shows. A new Friday night K-Pop entertainment show, hosted by ‘Eat your Kimchi’, launched in May to give fans an insight into Korean pop culture. The Canadian duo based in Seoul, South Korea, have more than 500,000 subscribers to their weekly YouTube channel.3 A second new commission launched in June featuring Australian born artist ‘Rome’, of K-Pop boy band C-Clown, talking about his life as a K-Pop star.

Overall, SBS PopAsia registered large growth during 2013-14, in its pursuit to satisfy the needs of younger audiences who are hungry for new and engaging content. YouTube saw record numbers for SBS PopAsia with 477,000 views in June, taking SBS PopAsia’s lifetime views to over 5 million, up 185 per cent during 2013-14.4

30 SBS Annual Report 2014

5 Nielsen SiteCensus Streaming, Adobe Analytics, All In Mobile, TuneIn Radio; Google Feedburner; Unique Browsers includes sbs.com.au/yourlanguage, /chinese, / popasia, /poparaby, /popdesi, /lunarnewyear, /podcasts, /chill and /radio. 6 Adobe Analytics, sites with URL sbs.com.au/yourlanguage, /chinese, /popasia, /poparaby, / popdesi, and /radio, Jun-2014.

Award-Winning Content SBS Radio provides broadcasters with the opportunity to pitch for additional resources to develop distinctive content. The process continued to inspire success this year, with commissioned projects reaping awards and recognition.

The Enemy Within was a compelling radio documentary exploring family violence in the Australian Indian community, through the voices of victims, experts, police and the court system. Many of the stereotypes around Indian culture, victims and perpetrators of family abuse are challenged through the stories of six victims of family abuse residing in Melbourne and Sydney.

The Other 9/11 was a radio and online documentary exploring Australia’s involvement in the 1973 coup d’état led by General Augusto Pinochet which overthrew the socialist democracy of Salvador Allende. The Other 9/11 was awarded Best Investigative Story of the Year at the NSW Premier’s Multicultural Media Awards 2014.

Community Engagement & Research SBS Radio is conducting more radio research than ever before:

- Audience Measurement Surveys in 11 languages conducted by McNair Ingenuity

- Audience Feedback Surveys in eight languages conducted online via the ‘SBS Exchange’

- ALC Online Tracking Statistics, including social media activity

- Community Engagement meetings and events providing invaluable feedback

SBS Radio implemented an extensive Community Engagement program to deepen engagement with communities and improve the quality and relevance of content to drive audience growth. SBS Radio participated in a range of national and cultural festivals, art and fi lm festivals, industry events and forums, client and government sponsored events and SBS stakeholder events (see Appendix 20).

SBS Radio Online and SBS Radio app Record audiences engaged with SBS Radio online and via the SBS Radio app:

- ALC audio streams (average monthly) - up 22.8 per cent

- ALC podcast downloads (average monthly) - up 24.2 per cent

- ALC unique browsers (average monthly) - up 117.3 per cent5

SBS Radio language program websites grew to a record high of 734,000 unique browsers in June 2014,6 driven by new and emerging language programs such as Tigrinya and Dinka.

A new SBS Radio homepage launched in April 2014, as the fi rst step in upgrading all in-language sites. The dynamic new site fi ts to mobile, tablet or browser windows, allowing greater usability and an improved radio player. The SBS Your Language app was also relaunched in June 2014 as the SBS Rad io app.

The Enemy Within was honoured in the Best Special Report category at the prestigious 2014 New York Radio Awards, nominated for a 2013 Walkley Award and received a 2013 United Nations Association of Australia Media Award for Increasing Awareness and Understanding of Women’s Rights and Issues.

31

A slate of exclusive multimedia projects connected SBS with Australians through its digital platforms, driving an unprecedented 17 per cent growth in unique audiences1 in 2013-14. Online video views grew to an average of more than 7 million per month,2 backed by the strengthening of the program offer on catch-up service, SBS ON DEMAND and streams served via 3rd party sites such as YouTube.

Migration of the legacy network onto a new content management system (CMS) and a suite of fully responsive SBS websites marked a new digital era and sharpened the Online team’s output, setting the foundations for ongoing innovation on this platform. New social media strategies shaped a cross-platform offering for key content.

Launch of Network 2.0 Sites SBS Food was the fi rst of a suite of Network 2.0 sites launched from August 2013, utilising the facets of the new CMS and was the fi rst broadcaster in Australia to implement a fully responsive website across all platforms and digital devices, from desktop, to tablet, to mobile. SBS rolled out 10 sites in quick succession using effi ciencies leveraged from the common platform.

Online exclusive distinctive multimedia projects The Other 9/11- September 2013 A feature interactive project that told the story of how Australia was involved in the violent coup that overthrew the Chilean government in 1973, developed in two weeks with new agile systems.

Vote for Uncle Sam - September 2013 A campaign site to support ‘Uncle Sam’ from the Legally Brown series aligned with Uncle Sam’s do-it-yourself attitude and housed regular blog updates and video messages in the lead up to the series.

Exit Syria: Diaries from Za’atari - November 2013 A real-time immersive documentary set in the heart of one of the world’s harshest refugee camps at the Syria-Jordan border which documented the lives of refugees in the Za’atari refugee camp.

JFK The Smoking Gun - November 2013 A mini interactive released to coincide with the ground-breaking documentary purporting to show what happened on the day that JFK was shot.

China to Australia - January 2014 To complement SBS’s coverage of the 2014 Lunar New Year, Online launched China to Australia - an interactive website that used cutting-edge 360 degree 3D video technology to take audiences into the heart of Sydney’s Lunar New Year Twilight Parade and share stories of Chinese-Australians.

Secret Cross Dresser Society - March 2014 In partnership with The Feed, this mini documentary and interactive site followed a group of men who dress up as women in the secret Seahorse Society.

Cronulla Riots - The Day That Shocked the Nation - April 2014 This fl agship and exclusive, interactive documentary explored the events of December 2005, told through a series of testimonials from predominantly Lebanese-Australians who were affected by the events. Cronulla Riots won three prestigious AIMIA awards.

After 6/4 - May 2014 To coincide with the 25th anniversary of the events of Tiananmen Square, SBS Online launched an interactive project which made use of archival content from both Chinese and other international media and included six short-form documentaries, telling stories Chinese-Australians.

Operation Rimau/Australia’s Secret Heroes - June 2014 Told the gripping story of a secret Australia WW2 mission, with an interactive design adding further depth to the second episode of the SBS commissioned television series, Australia’s Secret Heroes.

Sources 1 Nielsen Online Ratings ‐ Hybrid, SBS (Special Broadcasting Service) (Parent), Financial Year 2013/14 vs Financail Year 2012/13, Average Monthly Unique Audience. 2 SiteCensus, Xbox & Sony Bravia Server Logs, Fairfax, YouTube, iTunes and Bigpond TV, Adobe Analytics, and Google Analytics. 3 SiteCensus, Xbox & Sony Bravia Server Logs, Fairfax, YouTube, iTunes and Bigpond TV, Adobe Analytics, and Google Analytics. 4 Adobe Analytics. (SBS Production, April 2014-July 2014).

Exit Syria received a nomination as a fi nalist in the Political Blog category in the 2014 Webby Awards, a prestigious international reward that recognises the best of the web from around the world.

32 SBS Annual Report 2014

“Innovation in the digital space is key to the future of delivering uniquely SBS content for all Australians, and adding SBS ON DEMAND to HbbTV-enabled televisions continues our commitment to bringing content to audiences when they want, and where they want it.”

- Chief Digital Offi cer Marshall Heald.

Ongoing Development and Growth of SBS ON DEMAND Ongoing development and growth of SBS ON DEMAND catch-up viewing continued, with the app on 18 platforms at June 2014 and retaining its position as Australia’s number one Video on Demand (VOD) platform in terms of platform coverage. Its growth was boosted by emerging platforms, particularly tablets and smartphones. SBS ON DEMAND launched on the Google Play store, Hisence Google TV sets and HbbTV. The app was launched on Xbox ONE and selected Kindle devices, and updated on the Samsung App store and devices.

SBS launches fi rst with HbbTV in Australia SBS’s beta launch of Hybrid Broadcast Broadband television (HbbTV) in June 2014 led SBS to be the fi rst free to air broadcaster nationally to embrace the technology.

Video views grew from 5 million in June 2013 to over 17 million in June 2014, driven by views of videos on 3rd party sites, in particular on YouTube which accounted for over 1.6 million views in June 2014.3

Fargo set a new record for the most streamed drama ever on SBS ON DEMAND, with 10 episodes serving 1.4 million video views.4

Awards

AIMIA Award Winners SBS.com.au (Homepage) Best Publisher

Cronulla Riots: The Day that Shocked the Nation Best Cultural or Lifestyle Best Use of Video Most Innovative Digital Product or Service - Content Innovation

AIMIA Award Nomination SBS ON DEMAND Best of Tablet - Entertainment

Webby Nominations Exit Syria: Diaries from Za’atari Finalist in the Political Blog Category

Cronulla Riots: The Day that Shocked the Nation Honouree for Best Visual Design - Function Honouree for Best Use of Video or Moving Image

FWA Nominations After 6/4

Interactive online documentary Cronulla Riots - The Day That Shocked the Nation won three prestigious AIMIA Awards.

33

O Onlin ne delivers s record gr rowth

Launch of new Comedy site The new comedy site launched in March 2014 with a mission to introduce Australian audiences to new comedy from across the world, featuring a wide range of local and international content. The comedy community responded well to SBS’s Comedy Runway initiative where SBS partnered with state screen agencies to select and produce a comedy web pilot each month. In its fi rst round $260,000 worth of funding is being issued to emerging fi lm makers and comedians, with over 550 applications received.

Sources 5 iTunes via App Annie, Google Play, Samsung Apps. 6 June 2013 = On Demand Events Tracking via SiteCensus; June 2014 = Adobe Analytics + Google Analytics ‐ The World Game and Google Analytics ‐ World Cup app. 7 iTunes via App Annie, Google Play, Samsung Apps. * Android fi gures include apps installed via Samsung Apps. ** The World Game includes The World Game Match Tracker and The World Game FIFA World Cup Edition. *** SBS Radio was previously known as SBS Your Language

SBS iOS and Android apps were downloaded 1 million times in 2013-14. In total, SBS apps have been downloaded 2.5 million times since the fi rst app was launched in May 2011. SBS ON DEMAND became the network’s most downloaded app.5

756

604

442

306

143 140

107

38

5 3

SBS ON DEMAND World News

Australia

The World Game**

Tour de France 2012-14

Tour de France 2011

SBS Pop Asia SBS Radio***

SBS Chill

SBS Pop Desi

SBS Pop Araby

SBS app Downloads and Installs7 (000s) May 2011 to June 2014

Android* iOS

2,719

Desktop Tablet Smartphone Game SmartTV SetTop

5,249

187

3,972

126

293 193

1,257

4 6

731

4,750

Total Stream Views6 (000s) By Platform - 2012-13 v 2013-14

FY2012-13 FY2013-14 % Change

+93% +550% +2025% +132% +552% +45%

34 SBS Annual Report 2014

Sources 1 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 01/07/2013 to 30/06/2014, Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS ONE, SBS 2 and NITV, Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59, Monthly Cume Reach (5 mins cons, Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 2 SiteCensus and Adobe Analytics, Jul-2013 to Jun-2014, Program = ‘World News Australia’ or ‘SBS World News’.

SBS News and Current Affairs reached an average of 5.5 million Australians each month. The highest reaching month of the year was June with a reach of 6.1 million viewers.1

One Newsroom The implementation of an integrated, cross-platform newsroom in May 2014 brought together SBS’s television, radio and online news teams.

With a centralised news desk and improvements in the commissioning and story development process, SBS has reduced duplication of resources on stories. This allows the newsroom to deliver a greater volume of higher quality, in-depth news and analysis, publishing across all platforms.

The One Newsroom model has also built stronger ties between SBS World News, Dateline, Insight, The Feed, NITV News and Living Black, with more opportunities to complement coverage and offer a range of perspectives.

World News - Television World News Australia was renamed SBS World News in February 2014, refl ecting audience recognition and perceptions of SBS’s news bulletins.

The early evening bulletin performed strongly in the face of signifi cant industry challenges, including the Australian Government retune and the expansion of Nine and Seven Network news bulletins to an hour.

Distinctive content with a multicultural perspective The quality and depth of international coverage remained paramount, with extensive reports which brought stories closer to home and highlighted the relevance for communities in Australia.

SBS World News retained its commitment to coverage of multicultural issues and events, producing more content for Australia’s diverse communities on education, small business, investment and the cost of living.

With increased collaboration with NITV News, SBS World News continued to report on issues relating to Indigenous Australians, exploring employment policy, the Indigenous vote in the Federal Election, and profi les on Indigenous candidates. SBS also took on three aspiring young journalists in 2014 under the SBS cadetship program, including one of Indigenous heritage.

An average of 2.5 million viewers tuned in per month to watch SBS World News Monday to Friday.1 SBS World News was among the biggest growth areas online with the 6:30pm bulletin generating 426,000 online video views per month.2

2013 Federal Election and Federal Politics Extensive coverage of the Federal Election was a core priority for SBS World News. Alongside standout interviews with party leaders Tony Abbott and Kevin Rudd, news teams focused on issues in large multicultural communities, explored the views of non-English speaking voters and provided coverage of SBS Radio’s public forums. News teams brought a diversity of perspectives to audiences with ongoing and in-depth coverage of national issues including immigration policy, the carbon tax, education funding, and the Federal Budget.

35

Sources 3 Google Analytics, 01/08/2013 to 21/07/2014. 4 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 01/07/2013 to 30/06/2014, Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS ONE, Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59, Monthly Cume Reach (5 mins cons), AUD; Metro and Regional FTA Share %, Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 5 Facebook Insights, June 2014. Twitter, June 2014. 6 Essential Media Communications, ‘The Essential Report’, August 2014.

Dateline viewers each month

Dateline Dateline lead media coverage of key international news events, attracting 1.2 million viewers each month.4 Key stories were the Cairo trail of Australian journalist Peter Greste, unrest at Manus Island, the effects of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, and the violent uprising in Ukraine.

Research into perceptions of Dateline has been used to broaden viewership by targeting audience interest areas and covering more breaking news events. A new partnership between SBS and Qantas is bringing Dateline episodes to passengers on international and domestic fl ights.

The Feed The Feed developed substantially over the year and was recommissioned in 2014 with an extended half hour format.

The Feed was recognised with a 2013 Walkley nomination in the multimedia story telling category for Patrick Abboud’s report ‘Tagging the Taliban’, and reporter Joel Tozer received a 2014 Walkley Young Journalist of the Year Award for his reports ‘Inside Providence: The secretive Korean church led by a Convicted Rapist’; ‘Carmen’s Story: Living through the Pain of Abuse’; and ‘Cotton Wool Kid’.

The Feed also partnered with the Sydney Opera House’s Festival of Dangerous Ideas to collaborate on The Feed’s content for the festival, which raised awareness for both The Feed and SBS 2.

Ne ews ws s and nd nd Cu u urre ent nt n A Affa aiirs rs r b bec com m mes On O e e e Ne ew ws w r roo om m m

World News - Radio The Radio News team continued to support Audio and Language Content (ALC), providing news and feature stories for language groups. Radio output has benefi ted from the integrated workfl ows of the One Newsroom, with a wider variety of stories available for SBS’s radio language programs.

The team was recognised with a number of awards. The Enemy Within, a collaboration between Punjabi Language Program Executive Producer Manpreet Singh and NACA Radio’s Sacha Payne, won a Silver Radio Award at the New York Festival’s International Radio Program Awards.

World News - Online The News and Current Affairs (NACA) Online team produced multiplatform content for SBS’s news programs, and continued to build on its distinctive content offering, expanding its comment and analysis section which has been instrumental to online audience growth.

Key thought leaders, newsmakers and policy debaters regularly contribute feature pieces. A boosted focus on ‘digital fi rst’ storytelling with an emphasis on social media and infographics has allowed SBS to communicate stories clearly and effectively in new and engaging ways to keep pace with audience habits.

Between August 2013 and July 2014, social media delivered 25 percent of total news site sessions.3

Insight Insight celebrated its 10th year in a forum format, and with host Jenny Brockie at the helm, it again set the standard for discussion and debate on Australia’s key social, economic and political issues, reaching 1.6 million unique viewers per month.4

Jenny Brockie was recognised with a 2013 Walkley Award for All Media Interview for the ‘Young Mob’ special episode focusing on Indigenous teens in Alice Springs. Insight also received a 2013 UN Association of Australia Media Award for Promotion of Positive Images of the Older Person, for the episode ‘Good Old Sex.’

Insight continued to engage with its audience online, with Jenny Brockie and program guests live tweeting during broadcast. In June 2014, Insight had over 57,000 Facebook ‘likes’ and 48,000 Twitter followers, while Jenny Brockie had over 24,000 Twitter followers.5

36 SBS Annual Report 2014

WorldWatch SBS’s WorldWatch international television news bulletins are transmitted on SBS ONE and SBS 2, with news from 29 of the world’s broadcasters in 24 languages other than English. This unique service caters for the language and cultural needs of Australia’s increasingly diverse multicultural communities seeking news from their home countries.

WorldWatch was enhanced with two hours of live news in English broadcast overnight from fi ve different broadcasters, including NHK Tokyo, CCTV Beijing, Russia Today (RT) Moscow, Deutsche Welle (DW) Berlin, and France 24 (F24) Paris.

WorldWatch news bulletins available on SBS ON DEMAND were increased from 12 to 22 bulletins, and are also available via SBS’s language websites.

Living Black In its 11th year on SBS, Living Black returned in October 2013 with a fresh format series Living Black Conversations. Hosted by Karla Grant, it features interviews with prominent Australians to examine the impact of their work on the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Guests have included AFL star and Australian of the Year Adam Goodes, businessman and mining magnate Andrew Forrest, and Australia’s fi rst Indigenous surgeon Dr Kelvin Kong.

Video journalists reported from some of the most remote areas of Australia, including Wadeye in the Northern Territory and Yarrabah in far north Queensland, uncovering stories rarely covered by mainstream media. Key stories covered proposed changes to the Racial Discrimination Act 1975, the Noongar Native Title deal and Indigenous disadvantage. An ANZAC DAY special profi led Indigenous Australians serving in the armed forces.

Research by Essential Media shows that SBS TV news and current affairs is the second most trusted media across all platforms including print, radio, television and online. SBS TV news is trusted by 65 per cent of respondents, second only to the ABC at 67 per cent.6

37

Sources 1 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Database Inc WA, 01/10/2013 to 31/05/2014, Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS 2, Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59, Cume Reach (5 mins cons), Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 2 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Database Inc WA, 11/10/2013 to 16/04/2014, Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS 2, Friday 18:00-23:59, AUD, Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 3 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 11/10/2013 to 16/04/2014, Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS 2, Friday 18:00-23:59, AUD, Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV).

Sport brought an exhilarating range and depth of sports coverage to audiences across the country, with the network continuing to grow its core pillars of football and cycling.

As the home of international football, the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil was an extraordinary event that brought audiences together and challenged the network to deliver an outstanding multiplatform experience for viewers.

Cycling took centre stage in mid-2013 with the 100th edition of the Tour de France, while new additions to SBS, domestic A-League football and Australian Netball, solidifi ed their place with SBS.

2014 FIFA World Cup SBS has broadcast the FIFA World Cup since 1990, and in 2014 SBS brought Australians the best World Cup yet with a full suite of exclusive multiplatform coverage across television, radio, online, mobile, tablet and social media.

SBS aired and streamed all 64 matches live across its television, radio and online platforms, with highlights and match replays available through SBS ON DEMAND.

For a full account of the 2014 FIFA World Cup see pages 20-23.

A-League The A-League continued to fi nd its home on SBS, averaging a combined metro and regional audience of 123,000 for the Friday night live matches2 and offering online, mobile and radio broadcasts. While this performance was below SBS’s expectations, the subscription television games also experienced decline. For SBS, the A-League Grand Final achieved an average audience of 360,000, making it the highest rated broadcast on SBS 2 since the channel relaunched.3 SBS is continuing to work with Football Federation Australia (FFA) to improve ratings for the next season, through a partnership to grow the game including shifting it to SBS ONE.

Football presenter and journalist, Lucy Zelic, joined the network as a key member of SBS’s A-League on-air team for weekly highlight show, Thursday FC, with Matt Okine and David Zdrilic. The program was a new offering for Australian audiences but did not attract a strong enough viewership and the network refocused resources on building on the Friday night A-League following.

A new magazine deal was secured between the The World Game and FourFourTwo magazine for a monthly co-branded edition, commencing with the A-League season in October 2013.

Other football SBS also broadcast live coverage of many other football competitions, including the FIFA Under-20 World Cup semi-fi nals and fi nal, the FIFA Confederations Cup Final, the UEFA Super Cup, the Football Association (FA) Cup Final, and the Under-17 Women’s World Cup semi-fi nals and fi nal.

total viewers per month tuned in to watch A-League content on SBS.1

38 SBS Annual Report 2014

4 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 06/07/2013, Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS ONE, 02:00-25:59, Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 5 Nielsen SiteCensus, Weeks 26-30 (Mon 24-Jun-2013 to Sun 28-Jul-2013) vs Same Time Last Year, includes all URLs containing /cyclingcentral, /cyclingcentral/tourtracker, cyclingcentral.social.sbs.com.au/. 6 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, SBS Network TTL, 01/07/2013 ‐30/07/2014, 02:00-02:00, Cume Reach (5 Cons Minutes), Total People, Consolidated (Live+As Live+TSV). 7 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 10/05/2014 -01/06/2014, Total Individuals inc Guests, SBS ONE, 02:00-25:59, Cume Reach (5 mins cons) and Metro FTA Share %, Consolidated (Live +As Live + TSV). 8 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 02/03/2014-17/06/2014, Total Individuals inc Guests, SBS 2, AUD and Metro FTA Share %, Consolidated (Live+As Live+TSV).

Other cycling SBS broadened its popular cycling offering in 2014 by broadcasting all stages of the Giro d’Italia, the fi rst of cycling’s three Grand Tours, live for the fi rst time. The race is a lead-in to the Tour de France and built on SBS’s cycling pedigree ahead of its Tour broadcast.

The Giro d’Italia reached 2.4 million Australians and the live stages averaged 107,000 viewers, an 81 per cent increase on 2013. The live coverage of the event had a metro free to air share of 8 per cent on SBS ONE and attracted over 295,000 catch-up chapter views online.7

Live coverage of the Cycling Australia National Road Championships from Ballarat was shown on SBS ONE in January 2014 and live coverage of the Cycling UCI World Road Championship from Florence, Italy was broadcast on SBS 2 in September 2013.

Netball SBS was proud to broadcast the ANZ Netball Championships, bringing women’s sports to free to air television. The ANZ Netball Championships Final between Melbourne Vixens v Queensland Firebirds wrapped up the season with a 107,000 combined metro and regional audience and a metro free to air share of 4.7 per cent.8

SBS football reached an average of 2.2 million Australians each month, peaking in June with a reach of 8.9 million viewers driven by SBS coverage of the 2014 FIFA World Cup.6

Cycling SBS broadcast its 23rd consecutive coverage of the Tour de France in 2013 including new panel review shows on rest days and late stages and longer highlights on SBS 2. The Tour de France attracted 5.3 million Australians across three weeks of competition, peaking for the Live Stage 8 event which had a combined audience of 523,000 across Australia.4

Over the 23 days of the Tour de France, the Cycling Central website attracted 2 million user sessions, up 5.3 per cent on the 2012 event.5

SBS’s Tour De France Tour Tracker iOS and Android apps were downloaded by 65,000 new users in 2013-14, bringing the total downloads to 306,000 since its launch in 2012.

39

SBS is a destination for food programming with a cultural difference.

In 2013-14 SBS built on its food reputation with a daily 30 minute food programming strip in the evenings and an emphasis on building Thursday food nights as unique culinary and cultural journeys.

Inspired by the SBS Charter, programs such as Peter Kuruvita’s Mexican Fiesta, Destination Flavour Japan hosted by Adam Liaw, and Luke Nguyen’s France explored culture through food and travel, winning broad industry acclaim.

As part of the Thursday night strategy, SBS optimised its return on investment for its food commissions by offering new audiences the opportunity to discover well established brands with the 7:30pm timeslot showing repeats of two of SBS’s most popular food brands, Italian Food Safari and Gourmet Farmer. These were complemented with re-runs of the acquired program Two Greedy Italians.

SBS’s food acquisitions strategy complemented the Australian commissioned offering and identifi ed overseas talent who fi t into the SBS line-up. Two strong stand-out successes for acquired food content were Heston’s Fantastical Feasts, with chef Heston Blumenthal familiar to SBS audiences, and brand new discovery Rachel Khoo with Little Paris Kitchen. Both identities have new programs coming into the SBS ONE schedule next year.

SBS Food SBS Food is also one of SBS’s most popular online destinations, with thousands of recipes, videos and exclusive online-only content from SBS food programs. The launch of a new, visually rich and responsive website now allows audiences to easily search and share recipes with friends. Food theme months on the site are integrating major programming events like the World Cup, Eurovision and Tour de France. The site also offers food columns, presenter profi les and interviews with top celebrity chefs.

Mexican Fiesta 2 million unique viewers tuned in to SBS ONE to watch Mexican Fiesta with Peter Kuruvita as he explored the vibrancy and heart of Mexican cuisine, with a combined metro and regional average audience of 349,000 and a 5.3 per cent metro free to air share.1

The Mexican Fiesta Facebook page delivered over 700,000 impressions and a reach of over 560,000, including 11,000 clicks to the SBS Food page.2

Sources 1 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 13/02/2014 to 17/04/2014; Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS ONE, Sun-Sat 18:00-23:59, Cume Reach (5 mins cons), AUD and Metro FTA Share, Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 2 Facebook Insights, March 2014. 3 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 19/06/2013 to 23/11/2013, Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS ONE, Sun-Sat 18:00-23:59, Cume Reach (5 mins cons), AUD and Metro FTA Share, Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 4 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 14/04/2014 to 12/06/2014, Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS ONE, Sun-Sat 18:00-23:59, Cume Reach (5 mins cons), AUD and Metro FTA Share, Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV).

Luke Nguyen’s France In Luke Nguyen’s latest show for SBS, his passion for food led him to the culinary wonderland of France where he explored the rich history of the country and the infl uence France has had on Vietnam’s culinary scene. The program had a combined average audience of 453,000, a 7 per cent metro free to air share and 2 million unique viewers tuning in across the season.4

“Mexican Fiesta [offers] real insight not just into local cuisine but a great snapshot of historical and contemporary society.”

- Herald Sun.

Destination Flavour Japan Destination Flavour Japan reached 2 million unique viewers on air, as Adam Liaw embarked on a solo adventure drawing on his seven years in Tokyo, with a combined average audience of 348,000 tuning in to SBS ONE and a 5.5 per cent metro free to air share.3

There was an overwhelmingly positive response from viewers to the show via SBS’s audience feedback panel, The Exchange, who loved Adam’s unassuming but knowledgeable nature with 97 per cent agreeing the program was a “good fi t with SBS”.

40 SBS Annual Report 2014

SBS food programming reached an average of 3.2 million Australians each month, due to the implementation of a daily food strip in the 6:00pm timeslot, with a spike in April 2014 driven by the popularity of SBS commissions Luke Nguyen’s France and Destination Flavour Japan.5

5 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 01/07/2013-30/06/2014, Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS ONE, SBS 2 and NITV, Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59, Cume Reach (5 mins cons), Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV).

“Another handsomely produced SBS culinary travelogue. [Adam] is a TV natural and he is totally in his element exploring the fl avours of Japan.” - Sunday Age.

41

SBS delivered three key documentaries over the summer period that engaged Australians with their unique offering and attracted a broader audience to SBS.

Australian Documentary Season The SBS commissioning team delivered three one-off documentaries which were scheduled over three consecutive weeks in the Insight timeslot, a great match for these issues based titles, Change My Race, Surgery Ship, The Network.

Sunday December Line Up SBS ONE had great success on Sunday evenings with the ‘Lost World’ programming strand. The network took a similar approach to Food and created a second slot at 8:30pm of strong repeat programming from the strand to fl ow audiences into a second hour of viewing. This fi ve week season optimised stock usage delivering a strong return on the investment as well as setting up the slot for the Drama season which started 8:30pm Sundays from the fi rst week of the calendar year.

Wild Saturdays Saturday nights continued to be a focus for the network, and over summer there was strong audience performance, driven by the ‘Wild Season’ of blue chip nature documentaries which were promoted to the audience as such and delivered an audience upswing for the period.

Once Upon a Time in Punchbowl Following on from the national award-winning and critically acclaimed series Once Upon a Time in Cabramatta which aired in 2012, Once Upon A Time in Punchbowl premiered in June 2014, telling the untold story of how the Lebanese community overcame the odds and found its place in multicultural Australia. Punchbowl reached 1.5 million Australians1 across the four-part series, hearing from community leaders, police, families and individuals, as they tell the compelling and dramatic story of a proud and resilient community under intense pressure. The series was complemented by an interactive SBS Online documentary, Cronulla Riots - The Day that Shocked the Nation which earned industry acclaim, as well as a major exhibition The Heart of Punchbowl which captured the vibrancy of Lebanese Australians living in Punchbowl through portraits and conversation extracts put together by photographer Andrew Quilty and journalist Jackie Dent.

JFK Documentary Season The JFK Documentary Season brought 3 million Australians to SBS ONE in November 2013. ‘JFK: The Smoking Gun’ was the most popular program on SBS ONE in 2013-14, excluding World Cup matches, and achieved a metro free to air share of 13.5 per cent.2 SBS also aired the four-part acquired biography, JFK, and the documentary One PM Central Standard Time. This was a great example of SBS commissioning a one-off landmark documentary and then curating a cohesive season across different program slots to build a strong viewing thread for the audience.

Persons of Interest Persons of Interest, a four-part societal documentary series, aired on SBS ONE in January 2014. Each week, a ‘person of interest’ was given their previously secret ASIO fi le and asked to respond to its contents, including theories, some true and some absurd. The series aired during the Tuesday night timeslot and attracted 1.2 million viewers across four weeks, with the fi rst episode achieving 330,000 combined metro and regional viewers.3

Australia’s Secret Heroes Australia’s Secret Heroes, a three-part documentary series, told the story of an elite group of Australian soldiers who took part in undercover operations in Asia during World War II. The series follows six of their descendants who recreate their forefathers training in explosives, camoufl age, killing and enduring torture. Combining archival footage, declassifi ed manuals and interviews, the series offered a deep and engaging refl ection on the war and its effects. The series aired in June 2014 on SBS ONE and attracted 1.1 million metro and regional viewers.

SBS continued its Multicultural Television Production Traineeship Scheme, providing short-term work placements for participants from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) and Indigenous backgrounds to work on SBS commissioned productions. In 2013-14 trainees worked on Gourmet Farmer and Once Upon A Time In Punchbowl, as well as programs in production for 2014-15.

Sources 1 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 19/06/2014 to 10/07/2014, Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS ONE, Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59, Cume Reach (5 mins cons), Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 2 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 03/11/2013 to 22/11/2013, Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS ONE, Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59, Cume Reach (5 mins cons) and Metro FTA Share, Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 3 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 07/01/2014 ‐ 04/03/2014, Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS ONE, 18:00 ‐ 24:00, Cume Reach (5 mins cons), Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV).

42 SBS Annual Report 2014

4 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional, 5 City Metro and Combined Regional Agg (Inc W.A), Network SBS TTL, July 2013 ‐ June 2014, 02:00-02:00, Cume Reach (5 Cons Minutes) and Cume ATS View, AUD & FTA Share % Total People,, Consolidated (Live+As Live+TSV).

Documentary was the most reached genre for SBS, with an average of 8.2 million viewers each month.4

Top Documentaries4

Program

Combined Audience

Sunday nights JFK: The Smoking Gun 879,000

Rome: What Lies Beneath 585,000

Richard III: The King In The Car Park 578,000 Pompeii: Cellar of Skeletons (rpt) 577,000 Machu Picchu Decoded (rpt) 557,000

Monday nights Pain, Pus and Poison 537,000

Countdown To A Catastrophe 535,000 Fat vs Sugar 518,000

The Truth About Fat (rpt) 516,000

Swallowed By A Black Hole 416,000

Wednesday nights Australia With Simon Reeve 590,000

Richard Hammond’s Miracles Of Nature 544,000 Walking Through History 540,000

Aliens Of The Deep Sea (rpt) 513,000

24 Hours In Emergency 500,000

Saturday nights Pilgrimage With Simon Reeve 612,000 Wild Croatia 456,000

Walking Through History 446,000

Nordic Wild 441,000

Wild Amazon 425,000

“If knowledge and understanding are the antidote to prejudice and bigotry, Once Upon a Time in Punchbowl should go a long way to healing some still-open wounds in Australian society.”

- The Age Green Guide.

43

SBS delivered brave and bold comedy and entertainment programs in 2013-14, connecting with Australia’s diverse audiences with a truly distinctive line-up.

The Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras was broadcast free-to-air for the fi rst time in 12 years, with a dedicated SBS fl oat included in the parade to celebrate diversity in all its forms (see page 26).

Established favourites the Eurovision Song Contest, RocKwiz and Housos continued to appeal to audiences, while innovative new commissions like Legally Brown and acquired gems such as If You Are the One brought audiences more of the distinctive television they have come to expect and love.

SBS’s fi rst drama commissioned in four years, Better Man, along with a stream of acquired international drama hit series including Vikings, Fargo, and Masters of Sex, had their fi rst run in Australia to record audiences.

Entertainment Entertainment on SBS channels reached an average of 3.5 million unique viewers each month. The highest reaching month was June 2014 with 5.6 million. This was driven by RocKwiz, A Pang for Brasil and The Full Brazilian.1

2014 Eurovision Song Contest In 2014 SBS was again home to the iconic annual Eurovision Song Contest, with the 59th celebration of the event held in Copenhagen, Denmark and hosted by popular SBS personalities Julia Zemiro and Sam Pang. SBS delivered unprecedented multiplatform coverage with an enhanced social television experience including on-screen integration of tweets and interactive voting.

SBS attracted 3.2 million unique viewers with its Eurovision coverage.2 SBS was proud to secure the opportunity for ARIA Award winning singer Jessica Mauboy to represent Australia with a performance during Semi Final 2. This was the fi rst time an Australian solo artist had taken to the Eurovision stage as a guest, with 180 million viewers tuning in across Europe.

SBS’s Eurovision offering was expanded to a full week, with a new fi ve part quiz show, The Eurovision Quiz Contest, broadcast on SBS 2. On SBS ONE a special documentary, Jessica Mauboy’s Road to Eurovision, followed the star on her journey to the biggest song contest in Europe.

SBS Radio brought audiences a month of non-stop Eurovision hits in the lead-up to the song contest through the SBS Eurovision pop-up radio channel. The channel simulcast the

Semi Finals and Grand Final, along with exclusive news bulletins direct and live from Copenhagen.

Eurovision continued to be a huge driver of online audience growth, with the SBS Eurovision site receiving 217,000 visits, up 32 per cent on 2012-13. The site also attracted 160,000 unique browsers, up 45 per cent year on year and 101,000 Eurovision video views were served across sbs.com.au and SBS ON DEMAND applications, 2.7 times as many as last year.3

Over the Eurovision fi nals weekend #SBSEurovision received over 161,174 tweets and trended worldwide at number one across all three nights, with a peak of approximately 1,000 tweets per minute during the broadcasts.4

Sources 1 OzTAM Metro, OzTAM National STV & RegTAM Regional FTA Database inc WA and National STV Homes, 01/07/2013 to 30/06/2013, 18:00-23:59, Total People Inc Guests; SBS ONE, AUD, Cume Reach (5 mins cons), FTA Share%, Average Time Spent Viewing, Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 2 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 09/05/2014 to 11/05/2014, Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS ONE, Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59, Cume Reach (5 mins cons) and AUD, Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 3 Adobe Analytics; 06-May-2014 to 10-May-2014; measures sbs.com.au Eurovison site and related content, and SBS ON DEMAND applications. 4 Twitter, May 2014.

“SBS is on a roll, and it’s not only because of the Eurovision Song Contest or the approach of the World Cup soccer. Its documentaries and dramas are soaring this year, and its three channels now attract 7 per cent of the prime-time free-to-air audience.” - Sydney Morning Herald May 12, 2014.

44 SBS Annual Report 2014

RocKwiz RocKwiz returned in March 2014 for Season 12, launching with a special episode saluting Australian songwriters Harry Vanda and George Young, focusing on an important slice of Australia’s musical history. With Julia Zemiro at the helm and charismatic showman Brian Nankervis in support, the series hosted dozens of Australia’s biggest names in music, including Gotye, Tina Arena, Billy Bragg, Steve Kilbey, and Indigenous star Dan Sultan. Two special episodes were recorded at Australia’s premier blues and roots festival, the 25th Byron Bay Bluesfest. This was SBS’s fourth run of RocKwiz shows at Bluesfest, with an exciting cast of Australian and international acts.

If You Are The One If You Are The One, the biggest entertainment show in China, proved to be very popular as a light entertainment option for early evening audiences on SBS 2. The cult dating game show attracts a strong and loyal audience while generating dynamic social media activity from fans who love its quirky appeal.

Mythbusters Mythbusters continued to be a strong audience driver for SBS ONE, with series 1 attracting an average audience of 354,000 and

a 4 per cent share of metro free to air share.1 Series 2 brought the science duo to Australia, kicking off in Melbourne with 2.3 million unique viewers tuning in for the premier episode.1

The Full Brazilian As part of SBS’s broader content offering around the 2014 FIFA World Cup, SBS commissioned The Full Brazilian, a daily prime-time entertainment show hosted by comedian and football fan, Jimeoin, shot in front of a live studio audience. The show gave a light-hearted take on the World Cup, with issues of the day and headlines explored through sketches and in-studio challenges, featuring musical acts, celebrities, and sportspeople. It also included daily catch-ups with SBS football presenters Les Murray and Craig Foster live from Brazil, as well as segments with Nazeem Hussain (Legally Brown), exploring the beauty and chaos of Brazil during the World Cup of a lifetime.

A Pang for Brasil Also forming part of SBS’s extensive 2014 FIFA World Cup content offering was a two-part commissioned series, A Pang for Brasil, hosted by SBS personality Sam Pang. The program followed Sam on a journey into the heart of Brazil’s culture - from picturesque Rio de

Janeiro to the mega metropolis Sao Paolo, to vibrant party town Salvador - introducing Australian audiences to a colourful cast of local characters along the way.

The Observer Effect The Observer Effect aired from June to October 2013 on SBS ONE. Hosted by acclaimed journalist Ellen Fanning, the program offered audiences a series of long-form interviews with high profi le Australians, using news from the week to draw out their views and spark debate around key issues shaping the national conversation. The series featured a light and entertaining format, attracting a range of guests across diverse industries, including former Premier of NSW Bob Carr, Coles CEO Ian McLeod, actor Dan Aykroyd, singer and musician Seal, and journalist and television presenter Ray Martin. Amongst the most popular episodes were those featuring political guests Clive Palmer, Barnaby Joyce and Malcolm Turnbull, which drew strong audiences in the three months leading up to the Federal Election.

45

Comedy Comedy on SBS brought laughs to an average of 2.4 million unique viewers each month, driven by established favourite Housos and newcomer Legally Brown.1

Housos Comic actor Paul Fenech returned to Australian television screens with the second series of the polarising comedy hit, Housos. Created and directed by Fenech, Housos invited audiences back into the fi ctional housing commission block in Sunnyvale, following the riotous day-to-day adventures of its residents. The second season of Housos attracted a combined average audience of 406,000 on SBS ONE, with a total of 2.9 million unique viewers tuning in across SBS ONE and SBS 2.1 Housos was awarded Most Outstanding Light Entertainment Program at the 2014 TV Week Logie Awards.

“Housos, a whole new sort of wrong, but oh-so-right, taps like few others into the unique strain of Aussie humour.”

- The Sunday Times.

Drama SBS built on its reputation for bringing Australians diverse dramas from across the world in both English and LOTE. The strategy attracted major audiences for the network and reaffi rmed the organisation’s insights into world television viewing trends, with SBS drama content reaching an average of 3.3 million Australians each month.1

Better Man SBS broadcast its fi rst commissioned drama in four years with Better Man, the story of the last Australian to be executed in South East Asia, for drug traffi cking in Singapore.

The powerful mini-series reached 1.4 million unique viewers, with 7 per cent metro free to air share1 and 230,000 online video chapter views.5 It received critical acclaim, including two 2014 TV Week Logie Award nominations, with lead actor Remy Hii winning a Graham Kennedy Award for Most Outstanding Newcomer.

Vikings1

Vikings, a Canadian-Irish historical drama hit series starring Australian actors Travis Fimmel and Alyssa Sutherland, was one of SBS’s most popular acquisitions with 3.1 million unique viewers tuning in to watch season 1 across SBS ONE and SBS 2. The series achieved an 11.6 per cent metro free to air share on SBS ONE.

Vikings season 2 was the most popular series on record for SBS ON DEMAND with 1.2 million video chapter views across 10 episodes, a 58 per cent increase on season 1.6

C C Char r rte t r in ins sp spir res s e u u uniq que e e co o ome e edy d d a a and d d n en ntter r r e ta tt in nme e e ent n

Legally Brown Building on SBS’s proud history of provocative comedy, SBS commissioned a new and daring 10-part comedy series, Legally Brown, hosted and co-written by emerging talent Nazeem Hussain. The weekly series taps into Australians’ broad sense of humour, parodying many aspects of Australian culture, including race relations, local and international politics and pop culture.

The show featu res Nazeem performing stand-up comedy in front of a studio audience, as well as a succession of topical, socially relevant sketches and pre-recorded interviews. Legally Brown attracted 2.2 million Australians across the season on SBS ONE and SBS 2.1

“Legally Brown is at once sharp, funny and often uncomfortable - everything decent comedy should be.”

- The Age.

5 On Demand Stream Tracking Via SiteCensus, 22/07/2013 to 11/08/2013. 6 Video Chapter Views SBS Stream Tracking via SiteCensus and Adobe Analytics (SBS Production); 1-Jul-2013 to 30-Jun-2014.

46 SBS Annual Report 2014

The Walking Dead 1.1 million unique viewers were reached on SBS 2 for American post-apocalyptic horror drama television series The Walking Dead. The second season reached a total of 557,000 Australians.

Masters of Sex The American drama series Masters of Sex reached a total of 3.6 million unique viewers on SBS ONE and had 8.8 per cent metro free to air share. The series was also popular on catch-up with 917,000 video chapter views.

The Escape Artist 847,000 unique viewers watched British drama thriller The Escape Artist, with a 5.6 per cent free to air metro share.

Lillehammer The Norwegian series Lillehammer reached a total of 954,000 unique viewers on SBS ONE.

Borgen The second installment of the Danish political drama reached a total of 1.2 million unique viewers and had a 5.3 per cent metro free to air share.

The Bridge A total of 1.1 million unique viewers were reached by the second season of the Scandinavian crime drama with the program achieving a 4.7 per cent metro free to air share.

4.5

4.0

3.5

3.0

2.5

2.0

1.5

1.0

0.5

2.3

Jul 13 Aug 13 Sep 13 Oct 13 Nov 13 Dec 13 Jan 14 Feb 14 Mar 14 Apr 14 May 14 Jun 14

4.0

2.9

3.5

3.1

3.4

3.6

3.0

3.4

3.7

4.1

2.8

DRAMA: Reach1 (millions) By Month - 2013-14 Financial Year (Combined Metro + Regional)

“Better Man is a uniquely Australian story and one that only SBS would tell. It is a moving and important story ... and refl ects issues that affect our communities.”

- Tony Iffl and, SBS Director of Television.

“It is almost impossible to match the grand scale and magic of worldwide phenomenon of Game of Thrones, but this impressive Canadian/French drama can stand proudly with its sword in the air. With only a fraction of the budget of GOT, Vikings has created a scintillating and addictive drama that basks in its stunning Irish and Norwegian backdrops. And there’s no need to pay for this addictive costume drama, folks.” - News Ltd.

Orphan Black SBS 2 had its fi rst fast-tracked series from the United States, Orphan Black season 2. With series 1 having debuted on SBS 2 as part of the ‘Bite Nite’ strategy on Tuesday evenings, fast tracking again tapped into the interests of the younger demographic on the channel, delivering audiences the highly-anticipated second season return in the same week as the US. Season 2 reached 360,000 unique viewers on SBS 2, and had 268,000 chapter views via SBS ON DEMAND.

Fargo The American dark comedy crime drama series Fargo, inspired by the 1996 fi lm of the same name, reached a total of 1.9 million unique viewers and had an 8.2 per cent metro free to air share.

47

SBS champions international cinema in Australia and continues to attract strong audiences with its renowned offering of independent and international feature fi lms.

Regular fi lm slots built on a strong audience following, with arts commentator and journalist Sandy George hosting Saturday nights on SBS ONE, and Wednesday nights on SBS 2 hosted by Marc Fennell.

Movies reached an average of 4.1 million unique viewers each month, with the highest reaching month in December 2013, attracting 5.6 million viewers. This was boosted by the special Aussie Film Season over the summer, with 2.3 million viewers tuning in to SBS ONE to watch a fi lm.1

Movies have become a big part of the SBS 2 schedule, with Marc Fennell hosting ‘Movie Mayhem’ on Wednesday evenings - a dedicated, prime time destination for popular movies from across the world.

SBS Online engaged audiences with Tropfest, showing all short fi lms ON DEMAND and running a social television event during broadcast for the fi rst time in the event’s history. Tropfest trended #1 Australia-wide on Twitter, extending SBS’s social media reach to over 7 million Australians.2

Tropfest In December 2013, SBS 2 broadcast the world’s biggest short fi lm festival, Tropfest, from the live event in Centennial Park, Sydney - the second time the network has delivered the event to a free to air audience. Hosted by Marc Fennell, along with Adam Spencer and Yumi Stynes, the broadcast featured the 16 fi nalist fi lms, black carpet arrivals, and interviews with celebrity judges and fi lmmakers. The Sunday broadcast had a combined average audience of 130,000, with 47 per cent of viewers aged under 40, highlighting the fi t with the SBS 2 channel strategy.

Over half the metro audience was in Sydney, which illustrates the challenge of broadening the event to resonate with a national audience.3

Film Festival of 1000 Clicks and overnight fi lm A festival of fi lms replaced the long-running WeatherWatch in the early hours of the morning on SBS ONE and SBS 2, increasing the amount of in-language content on SBS, broadening its movie offering, and lifting overnight viewing. Launched in conjunction with the online stunt, The Film Festival of 100 Clicks, and the relaunch of the SBS Movies website, the new schedule also encouraged catch-up viewing online.

The Film Festival of 100 Clicks was the network’s fi rst ever virtual fi lm festival, grouped around themes and genres to make it accessible for audiences. It offered Australians the chance to watch 100 fi lms for free via SBS ON DEMAND, across 15 platforms, within 30 days. This was the fi rst time a free to air Australian broadcaster had delivered an offering of this many titles online and for free.

The festival program attracted 824,000 total video views for the month, and received overwhelmingly positive comments from audiences.4

Kung Fu Film Season SBS deepened audience engagement with the fi rst SBS ONE and SBS 2 joint fi lm season in January 2014, as part of the network’s broader Lunar New Year campaign. The Kung Fu Film Season showcased a selection of Chinese movies tailored to suit each channels’ different audiences, forming a cohesive offering across the networks and online.

Sources 1 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 01/07/2013 to 30/06/2014, Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS ONE, SBS 2 and NITV, Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59, AUD, Profi le and Cume Reach (5 mins cons) Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 2 Twitter, December 2013. 3 OzTAM Metro and RegTAM Regional FTA Inc WA, 02/12/2013 to 15/12/2013; Total Individuals Inc Guests, SBS 2, Sun-Sat 18:00-23:59, AUD and AUD Profi le, Consolidated (Live + As Live + TSV). 4 Adobe Site Catalyst / SBS Production; Date range: 1-31 March 2014.

viewers tuned in to SBS ONE to watch a fi lm during the special Aussie Film Season over the summer.72

48 SBS Annual Report 2014

SBS operates World Movies and STUDIO on the subscription platform through Foxtel, with revenue generated invested back into developing Australian content for SBS.

STUDIO From ballet to street art, STUDIO showcases the best of the world’s creativity and culture, including performance, documentary and drama series in languages other than English.

STUDIO, Foxtel and external contributors including Screen Australia and Screen NSW invested over $3.5 million in more than 40 hours of world premiere content. One major project, funded by the Foxtel Production Fund, was the three part series Taking On The Chocolate Frog, which challenged ex-criminals to perform the award winning Australian play ‘The Chocolate Frog’, and followed the process from rehearsals to the fi nal performance in front of a live audience.

Partnerships STUDIO partnered with Screen Producers Australia (SPA) to present the Kickstart initiative, which worked in conjunction with the Ones to Watch mentor program, supporting early career producers. Selected participants were offered the exclusive opportunity to pitch a television series to STUDIO and receive an investment of $300,000. The competition not only gave STUDIO exposure with SPA’s network and the broader arts industry, but also engaged audiences and positioned the channel as a genuine supporter of new talent and original content.

STUDIO again partnered with creative network The Loop to present the Create STUDIO competition. This involved a nationwide call-out for creatives to pitch their ideas for new, innovative STUDIO channel idents. Four artists were mentored by the STUDIO team and their fi nal pieces of work were featured on the

channel for a year. In June 2014, this project earned STUDIO a prestigious Global Promax BDA Award for the most outstanding ‘General Image Campaign’.

STUDIO partnered with Vivid Sydney and as part of Vivid Ideas 2014, supported the Pozible event ‘Stand Up, Stand Out’, a one night only live pitching session that gave project creators the opportunity to bring their idea to life. STUDIO provided a $3,000 prize to the winner.

Through these and many other partnerships with leading arts organisations, STUDIO was able to access diverse and discerning audiences, encourage deeper engagement, and develop positive associations for the STUDIO channel brand.

Sources 1 OzTAM National STV, STUDIO, 01/07/2012 to 30/06/2014, Sun-Sat 02:00-02:00, Monthly Cume Reach (5 mins Cons) and Total Individuals including guests, Consolidated (Live+As Live+TSV). 2 OzTAM National STV, World Movies, 01/07/2012 to 30/06/2014, Sun-Sat 02:00-02:00, Monthly Cume Reach (5 mins Cons), Total Individuals including guests, Consolidated (Live+As Live+TSV).

Awards

STUDIO and World Movies received six Global Promax BDA Awards:

General Image Campaign - Create STUDIO (GOLD);

Stunt Promotion Package using Multiple Media - World Movies Secret Cinema Holy Motors (GOLD);

Consumer Tie-in/ Brand Integrated Campaign using Multiple Media - STUDIO Mini-Paceman (GOLD);

Art Direction & Design: Press Kit - The Returned, STUDIO (SILVER);

Holiday/Seasonal/Special Event Program Campaign using Multiple Media - World Movies, Summer of Sin (SILVER);

Dramatic Program Campaign Using Multiple Media - The Returned, STUDIO (BRONZE).

STUDIO had an average monthly reach of 811,000, an increase of 8 per cent on 2012-13.1

49

World Movies World Movies is Australia’s only 24-hour channel for international and art house movies, also showcasing indie and cult features, documentaries and behind-the-scenes exclusives.

The channel screened movies from 47 countries in 52 languages, broadcasting 230 Australian television premiere fi lms - nearly doubling the total agreed with Foxtel.

World Movies built upon existing relationships with fi lm festivals across the country, and forged new ones, extending its reach and impact on Australian audiences. World Movies supported headline events including Sydney Film Festival and Melbourne International Film Festival. It also engaged with smaller cultural events such as the Alliance Française Film Festival, the Italian Film Festival, and the Arab Film Festival, boosting their reach with airtime and targeting specifi c communities through editorial opportunities.

World Movies Secret Cinema The iconic World Movies Secret Cinema was again hosted in Sydney, bringing international fi lm to life off-screen. This immersive experience involved over 400 participants visiting a secret location to view a movie revealed on the night, with themed entertainment and catering. The core objectives were to increase awareness and understanding of the World Movies brand and reach a new, younger audience. In 2014 World Movies was awarded Gold at the Global Promax BDA Awards, in the category for Stunt Promotion Package using Multiple Media, for the work on this campaign.

World Movies’ evening average audience saw an overall increase of 12.1 per cent year-on-year. Thursday increased by 32 per cent, the biggest increase in evening audience.

World Movies experienced signifi cant uplifts in online and social media interactions in the last year, with the World Movies website weekly traffi c up over 70 per cent year-on-year,3 while its Facebook audience increased 25 per cent.4

Sources 3 Google Analytics, Page Views, July 2013-June 2014 v July 2012-June 2013. 4 Facebook Insights, July 2013 versus July 2014.

Su u S bs s scr c ip p pti t on n n Tel elev evis sio on n n

World Movies had an average monthly reach of 821,000, an 8.3 per cent increase on 2012-13.2

50 SBS Annual Report 2014

SBS Brand Tracker SBS monitors performance of the SBS brand relative to the marketplace.

SBS Brand Tracker research is conducted twice a year to enable the organisation to gain a big picture view on media consumption, explore perceptions of the SBS network as a whole and of specifi c channels. SBS uses this research to better understand the appeal and engagement of different types of content to inform delivery of content across different platforms and to provide a competitive comparison of SBS relative to other networks.

Who Do We Think We Are? In search of ourselves: Understanding the Australian identity. Who Do We Think We Are? was a study commissioned by SBS in 2013 and conducted by Pollinate. It asked Australians from across the country key questions about how they believe the nation has changed in the past 20 years, what it means to be Australian today, and considers future implications for businesses and brands.

The study drew on data from a nationally representative sample of over 1000 across age, gender, location and language spoken at home to help decision makers position their brands to cater for a changing and increasingly diverse Australia, to ensure they stay relevant and maximise future opportunities in an increasingly diverse Australia.

The 2014 FIFA World Cup Market research company Sweeney was commissioned to conduct an online research project to assist SBS in development of the new The World Game website, providing insights into the content needs of existing users and strategies to acquire new users. The World Game website relaunched in May 2014, and won Website of the Year in the 2014 Football Fans Downunder Awards.

Audience feedback The SBS Audience Relations team coordinates audience feedback and provides the public with information about SBS programs and services.

SBS Audience Relations handled on average 185 calls per day, 80 email communications per day, 15 letters per week, and responded to social media enquires (including ongoing monitoring of social media pages).

While enquiries vary considerably, the main themes over 2013-14 included viewers seeking assistance with the Digital Retune and feedback around SBS’s signifi cant programming events such as the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the Tour de France.

SBS Audience Relations also received enquiries relating to general transmissions, positive feedback on several LOTE drama series including Borgen, changes to the WorldWatch schedule, SBS product releases, requests for programs and repeats, and informal complaints about SBS content or programming.

Formal complaints alleging breaches to the SBS Codes of Practice are forwarded to the SBS Ombudsman (see Ombudsman’s report on page 67). To ensure SBS platforms remain in tune with their audiences, all audience feedback is collated in a daily report by the Audience Relations team and sent to internal stakeholders.

Subtitling In order to provide multilingual and multicultural television services that inform, educate and entertain all Australians, SBS broadcasts English language programming as well as English-language subtitled non-English programming.

Programs in a language other than English (other than SBS’s WorldWatch schedule) are made accessible to a wider Australian audience through English subtitles. Subtitles enables audience, regardless of their cultural provenance to access programs in-language.

SBS predominantly uses subtitles, rather than voice over (or dubbing) as subtitling retains the linguistic and cultural integrity of the original programs and allows for effective cross-cultural communications.

In 2013-14: - Once Upon A Time in Punchbowl was subtitled into Arabic and the Arabic

version shown simultaneously on SBS ON DEMAND.

- Online real-time interactive online documentary called Exit Syria - Diaries from Za’atari which was subtitled from Arabic into English overnight.

SBS ONE - 1,368 hours of subtitling - 82 hours of re-narration - 4,340 hours of closed captions

SBS 2 - 1,421 hours of subtitling - 753 hours of closed captions

NITV - 424 hours of subtitles

Online - 22 hours of subtitles

Awards

The SBS Subtitling Unit won the Australian Institute of Interpreters and Translators (AUSIT) Excellence Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Industry for its LOTE subtitling work and for SBS’s ground-breaking use of LOTE subtitles in English programs to deliver on the SBS Charter with content that speaks directly to multiple generations of multilingual Australians.

51

In this section Technology and Distribution 53 Transmission 54

Farewell to Joe Skrzynski AO 56 Building an agile 57

and innovative workplace People and Culture 58

Corporate Social Responsibility 60 SBS Community Advisory 62 Committee Community and Industry 64 Engagement SBS Media and SBS Distribution 66 SBS Ombudsman 67

SBS Corporate 68

SBS Governance 72

52 SBS Annual Report 2014

Technology and Distribution is designing innovative service solutions that enable SBS to deliver content on whatever platform audiences choose.

2014 World Cup Technical Support SBS’s technical team was instrumental in delivering the 2014 FIFA World Cup from across the globe to a national audience. Over 20 major technology systems were refreshed or replaced in the lead up to the tournament to ensure audiences were able to watch all 64 matches live and in High Defi nition. During the event the broadcast operations team supported extensive on-ground coverage from Brazil and over 300 hours of studio programming from the SBS studios in Sydney, including live match hosting and the nightly entertainment program The Full Brazilian.

Advanced Sports Graphics Football fans are enjoying a new level of game analysis during A-League and World Cup coverage through SBS’s new advanced sports graphics system. The new technology presents a detailed visual analysis of gameplay to work alongside expert commentary from the Sports team.

Digitisation Project To protect historically and culturally important SBS content against loss and preserve it for future reuse, approximately 17,000 hours of obsolete and deteriorating videotape has been digitised and catalogued through the SBS Digitisation Project. For the fi rst time unique collections that had been previously inaccessible, such as the entire news archive of SBS’s Indigenous broadcaster NITV, are available catalogued and digitised. SBS’s rich history of commissioned documentaries and programs of national interest have also been captured. More unique content is set to be digitised over the coming year, including SBS’s diverse radio content and SBS World News archive.

Business Intelligence System SBS integrated a new Business Intelligence platform across all internal systems to enable close analysis of programming and sales performance across ratings and revenue. The enhanced analysis will guide future program and sales to refi ne the offering to audiences.

Engineering Test Lab The SBS Broadcast engineering team commissioned an operational test broadcast lab on the SBS premises which allows changes in the broadcast stream or head-end systems to be thoroughly tested prior to live broadcast. This will result in further stability and reliability for audiences receiving the SBS signal.

Workfl ow SBS’s internal workfl ow unit was established to assess work productivity challenges, measure performance and drive effi ciencies across the organisation. The project has already resulted in signifi cant cost savings for SBS through several initiatives aimed at increasing collaboration, visibility and accountability within and across teams. SBS Content, Marketing, Online, Technology and Distribution and News divisions are now operating more effi ciently as a broader unit with a focus on high-quality content delivery. The valuable insights gained from the workfl ow project are now being used to inform other processes across SBS and NITV.

53

SBS Television Services SBS Television phased out analogue services in 2013 and now transmits throughout Australia using only digital terrestrial and satellite services. SBS is also retransmitted on the cable subscription services of OptusVision and Foxtel, and the satellite subscription services of Foxtel.

- 324 digital terrestrial transmitters provided by Broadcast Australia;

- 125 retransmission services provided by Regional Broadcasters Australia (RBA), Transmitters Australia (TXA) and Government;

- 84 self-help transmitters; and

- Viewer Access Satellite Television (VAST) direct-to-home satellite services provided via Optus C1/D3 satellites.

SBS Radio Services SBS Radio transmits throughout Australia using analogue, digital and satellite services.

Analogue SBS Radio broadcasts two analogue services each in Sydney, Melbourne, Wollongong and Canberra and one service to other capital cities and Newcastle (see Appendix 13).

- 15 terrestrial radio transmitters provided by Broadcast Australia; and

- 153 self-help transmitters.

Digital SBS provides a simulcast of SBS Radio’s local analogue services, plus SBS Radio 3, SBS Radio 4 for special events, and four digital only music channels: SBS Chill, SBS PopAsia, SBS PopAraby and SBS PopDesi.

- 5 metro terrestrial transmitters provided by Broadcast Australia; and

- 1 trial service in Canberra.

Digital Switchover and Equalisation SBS assisted audiences to transition from analogue to digital television throughout the fi nal stages of the digital switchover. Information campaigns targeted each switch-off area and SBS operated a Reception Advice Line (RAL) for viewers experiencing diffi culties.

As part of the Government’s equalisation scheme, new digital services were added to areas where no SBS digital signal was previously available. SBS has added 60 new sites under the scheme, with another 20 due by June 2015.

Following the switchover, communities in remote or poor reception areas are increasingly taking up VAST. There are now over 224,000 households with VAST receivers, providing them access to the full suite of free-to-air digital radio and television channels.

SBS has assumed control of 12 self-help retransmission services, which are now being operated at no cost to their communities. There are 88 SBS self-help digital television and 153 self-help-radio transmitters licensed to provide SBS services.

Digital Retune The Australian Government’s retune project involved channel changes to around 1,400 services and 426 sites nationwide. As channel frequencies change, audiences are required to retune their digital receivers to continue receiving the SBS signal.

SBS moved from the UHF band to the VHF band in Perth, Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane during 2013-14 as part of the plan to keep broadcasts in the same area close together in frequency.

In markets where several free to air broadcasters were affected by the digital retune, audience numbers recovered quickly. However, the retune had a negative impact on audiences and revenue in markets where SBS was the only broadcaster retuning, particularly Melbourne and Brisbane.

SBS is working closely with the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA), Broadcast Australia and the Australian Government to ensure the impact on SBS audiences is minimised and bolstered the government retune communication campaign to ensure it specifi cally targeted SBS audiences.

Transmission Feedback SBS’s Reception Advice Line (RAL) logged and responded to over 4,600 support requests on a range of technical issues including the digital retune, transmission problems, faulty devices, synchronisation and recording issues, EPG data problems, and closed caption faults.

The retune generated the largest amount of calls, particularly from Melbourne, as viewers sought to restore SBS reception. The RAL team was able to provide assistance and solutions to viewers via phone and escalate issues where necessary. No calls were logged regarding SBS radio (analogue or digital) transmission in 2013-14.

54 SBS Annual Report 2014

Fault management system SBS has a complex fault management system for all key suppliers. Each supplier is required to log, manage and report on matters that will affect an SBS transmission, including planned outages for maintenance or project work, as well as respond quickly and effi ciently to faults.

In addition to the fault management services provided by our suppliers, the SBS transmission team keeps records of issues and faults in order to appropriately manage contractors. SBS also monitors service outages, and supports our audience via our Reception Advice Line.

Reach

June 2013 June 2014

Television

Analogue 70% 0%*

Digital 96% 97%

Radio

Analogue 63% 63%

Digital 63% 52%**

* The fi gure of 0% refl ects that from December 2013 to June 2014 there were no analogue television services operating as a result of the digital retune. ** Figure readjusted from previous years based on revised data source. Includes Canberra (trial).

Service availability The service availability of SBS’s television and radio services measures the proportion of time each transmitter is on air during the year.

June 2013 June 2014

Television

Analogue 99.8% 99.9%

Digital 99.8% 99.8%

Radio

Analogue 99.8% 99.9%

Digital 99.9% 99.9%

55

SBS Chair Joseph Skrzynski AO stepped down when his term ended on March 26, 2014, having served fi ve years on the SBS Board of Directors.

“Joe Skrzynski has been an outstanding chairman of SBS, a role in which he brought together his years of business experience, his deep and lived experience of multiculturalism and his passionate commitment to Australian arts and culture. SBS is a stronger organisation for his leadership and on behalf of the Government I thank him for his service in this important role.” - Minister for Communications Malcolm Turnbull.

“Joe’s commitment to delivering on SBS’s role of contributing to successful multiculturalism, coupled with his passion for the media and astute business mind, have guided the reshaping of our strategic direction when SBS was at a crossroads. His push to include an explicit statement on our role in aiding social cohesion in Australia and the exploitation of new technologies to do this, are now refl ected in the organisation’s mission and drive its focus on programming priorities.” - SBS Managing Director Michael Ebeid.

Under Joe’s Chairmanship SBS delivered distinguished ground-breaking national and international award-winning Australian programs like Go Back to Where You Came From 1 and 2; Immigration Nation, East West 101 and Better Man, undertook a major review of the SBS Radio Schedule to refl ect Australia’s changing migration patterns, launched NITV as Australia’s fi rst national free-to-air Indigenous television channel, incorporated subscription channels World Movies and STUDIO and relaunched SBS 2 to bring younger Australians to SBS.

Joe Skrzynski was appointed to the SBS Board in March, 2009 and elevated to Chair in December, 2009. He was the fi rst Chair to be appointed under the Australian Government’s merit-based process for government board appointments.

“I fi rmly believe the services SBS provides are more relevant today, than at any other point in its near 40-year history. “It would be a terrible mistake for Australia to rest on its laurels, rather than intensifying our efforts to maintain our internationally envied record of success as a socially cohesive multicultural society and our position as country of choice for skilled migrants. SBS has a vital role in this complex task.”

- Joe Skrzynski AO, March 2014.

Joe, a Polish refugee whose family arrived in Australia in 1950, provided a unique perspective on our Charter obligations and strong understanding of Australia’s multicultural communities.

Joe initiated a strategic review of SBS resulting in a revitalised expression of the SBS Charter, which then led to a period of transformation of the organisation in an environment of signifi cant changes in Australian society and in broadcast media.

56 SBS Annual Report 2014

One Newsroom SBS’s television, radio and online news teams commenced work from a newly refurbished integrated newsroom in May 2014. The One Newsroom project provides a physical space to support improved workfl ows across SBS platforms which are facilitating content sharing and cross-promotion.

The key component of the new space has been the creation of a central news desk which serves as the focal point for the coordination of news gathering activities. Journalists are now able to publish cross-platform content with greater ease and audiences are benefi ting from the increased coverage.

As part of the redevelopment the studio area has also been upgraded with new technology and a new set providing for greater production fl exibility and a refresh of SBS’s on-air look.

Agile Workplace SBS employees working in the commercial sales and distribution divisions of the Artarmon premises successfully completed their transition into an innovative agile work space in October 2013. Teams have enjoyed the fl exible seating arrangements supported by better technology and collaborative spaces.

The building works were completed following several feedback sessions to inform minor changes and adjustments to the space, technologies and behaviours. SBS has also greatly benefi ted from the creation of a new ‘content hub’ and unique shared meeting spaces in the atrium. These developments have transformed the Artarmon site into a state-of-the-art presentation space for a wide range of SBS internal and external events. The area has also been used as a backdrop for a number of SBS and NITV internal television productions.

Open Plan Model SBS implemented the fi nal stages of its mid-term accommodation strategy in 2013-14 by moving the remaining business divisions into an open plan environment.

The three year accommodation strategy has transformed all major parts of the existing Artarmon site into an open plan workplace and increased the number of collaboration and meeting spaces across the building.

The workplace model has absorbed signifi cant business growth within the existing building capacity and provides a physical platform to enhance collaboration and support the SBS One Team culture.

The following refurbishments were carried out last year:

- One Newsroom

- Technology and Distributions Solutions & Subtitling

- Finance

- Agile Workplace Pilot

57

SBS Organisational Culture SBS continues to invest in building a positive team culture that nurtures collaboration and high performance in the organisation, ensuring the business remains dynamic and successful in a changing and challenging media environment.

In 2013-14 the People & Culture team rolled out the second series of workshops to almost 1,000 employees across Melbourne, Sydney and Canberra. Employees had the opportunity to gain practical skills and further their understanding of the behaviours underpinning the SBS values of Diversity, Creativity, Respect and Collaboration.

As part of SBS’s investment in leadership, 2013-14 saw the release and implementation of cultural and behavioural standards for those in both senior leadership and management roles. These standards are now included in performance discussions and assessments.

SBS conducted an employee survey to track the progress of its culture initiatives and to establish a Culture & Engagement Index to be used in setting targets for 2014-15. SBS also began benchmarking the survey results against the Australian norm provided through our survey partner.

Career Development Throughout February 2014 People & Culture hosted the inaugural SBS Career & Development Month. During the month a range of career planning and development tools were introduced via the Learning & Development website. Employees also had the opportunity to attend career coaching and management workshops, hear guest speakers and shadow a colleague.

As part of Career Development Month, employees were invited to submit entries to a competition to spend a week in a media organisation of their choice. After an extensive review of over sixty entries, Virginia Melrose from SBS Archiving won a secondment to CNN in Atlanta, Georgia in the USA to learn about CNN’s operating model and develop valuable networks.

MYCareer@SBS In 2013-14 employees were able to actively participate in their individual goal setting and performance review process through the MyCareer online system. MyCareer supports employees to set clear work expectations, record achievements and improve development and career opportunities throughout the course of the performance cycle. Following the end of the cycle, improvements were made to the My Career system to streamline the review process and enhance the user platform.

Leadership Development SBS launched its fi rst leadership development program, ‘Leadership Essentials’. The program is aimed at those making the transition from individual contributors to fi rst line leaders and builds skills in core people management areas of goal setting, performance feedback and confl ict resolution, critical to the performance outcomes of the organisation.

Health & Wellbeing SBS continues to offer a wide range of Health & Wellbeing initiatives to its employees. In addition to a comprehensive Employee Assistance Program, staff have access to subsidised gym memberships, onsite physiotherapy, free health and fi tness assessments, health education seminars, quit smoking and weight loss programs.

Enterprise Agreement The SBS Enterprise Agreement expires in December 2014. Employee and manager consultations commenced in April 2014 in preparation for negotiations. SBS, the Community and Public Sector Union, the Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance, and employee representatives commenced negotiations for a new agreement in June 2014.

Workforce Overview SBS recruits employees and trainees from diverse language and cultural backgrounds. Employees are encouraged to provide diversity statistical information upon commencement of employment.

As at 30 June 2014: 34 per cent of employees are from a non-English speaking background; 46 per cent were born overseas; 49 per cent of staff are female; 33 per cent of the executive staff are female; 44 per cent of manager/supervisor staff are female; 4 per cent of non-language specifi c staff are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander; and 2 per cent of recruited staff have a permanent disability.

58 SBS Annual Report 2014

SBS Workplace Diversity Statistical Report

Number of employees Percentage of Total Workforce (%)

2012-2013 2013-2014 2012-2013 2013-2014

Language Spoken at Home

English 635 704 65% 54%

Language other than English 315 441 32% 34%

Not Stated 28 156 3% 12%

Total 978 1301 100% 100%

Place of Birth

Australia 541 688 55% 53%

Overseas 429 604 44% 46%

Not Stated 8 9 1% 1%

Total 978 1301 100% 100%

Gender

Female 487 631 50% 49%

Male 491 670 50% 51%

Total 978 1301 100% 100%

Aboriginal or Torres Strait islander 42 47 4% 4%

Permanent Disability 21 22 2% 2%

Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) SBS believes in developing a diverse workforce and this is refl ected in its recruitment processes, leadership development, culture programs and employee opinion surveys.

These processes ensure that appropriate action is taken to eliminate discrimination against, and promote equal opportunity for women, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, people from non-English speaking

backgrounds, and people who have a permanent disability, in relation to employment matters in accordance with the Equal Employment Opportunity (Commonwealth Authorities) Act 1987.

In 2013-14, thirty employees completed the ‘Leadership Essentials’ development program, with 44 per cent female participation. Of the thirty senior managers who commenced the ‘Leading the Business’ program, 40 per cent were female.

Results from the May 2014 employee survey showed a high number of female staff agreeing that they would recommend SBS as a great place to work (78.6 per cent), indicating that SBS’s workplace diversity measures are having an impact.

59

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) refl ects SBS’s values and strategic planning processes. As a multicultural and multilingual broadcaster, SBS is committed to setting a positive example as an organisation that upholds principles of integrity, respect, sustainability and social inclusion. SBS pursues responsible business practices through the SBS Foundation, the SBS Reconciliation Action Plan, community engagement and training programs.

Reconciliation Action Plan The SBS Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) takes a long term approach to embed reconciliation actions into the organisation under three overarching objectives:

(1) To be a reconciliation leader in the media industry by nurturing relationships and actively promoting business opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations and communities.

(2) To build cultural awareness of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples through adapted business systems that support RAP principles in order to promote recognition and respect for Indigenous cultures.

(3) To provide a consistent volume and quality of broadcasts about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, including carrying an acknowledgement of country on SBS productions and SBS commissioned content where relevant.

RAP activities are complemented by a sustained program of Indigenous community and stakeholder engagement supported by the SBS Board, Executive, Corporate Affairs, RAP Committee and other divisions across SBS and NITV.

Indigenous community engagement Indigenous community engagement is a valuable avenue to gain insight into and inform the ongoing work of SBS and NITV to ensure the organisation maximises the public benefi t of its services and remains relevant amongst the communities it was established to serve.

SBS and NITV built on their strong relationships with Indigenous communities and stakeholders through dialogue and consultation, development programs and partnerships.

SBS Board visits Alice Springs In a highlight for the year with lasting benefi ts for NITV, the SBS Board visited Alice Springs where they held the October Board Meeting, attended the Remote Indigenous Media Festival in Ntaria (Hermannsburg), hosted a function at the Mbantua Festival site and met with key NITV stakeholders.

Information Sessions NITV and SBS met with Indigenous leaders and community representatives across the country at information sessions convened in Sydney, Perth and Alice Springs, building on previous sessions in Broome, Darwin, Yarrabah, Melbourne, Adelaide and Brisbane.

Employee Engagement The RAP Committee marked signifi cant events on the calendar through employee engagement activities during National Sorry Day, Reconciliation Week and NAIDOC week. In June 2014 all employees were encouraged to participate in an Acknowledgement of Country project.

Jawun placement SBS was invited to join the Jawun Indigenous Corporate Partnership Group, which uses corporate, government and philanthropic involvement to build the capabilities of Indigenous people and organisations. In October 2013, a trial was conducted in the South Sydney Indigenous Community where an SBS employee helped a community youth group develop fi lm and media materials.

CQ: Who Should Tell Indigenous Stories? SBS CQ was a program produced in-house by SBS staff and broadcast on SBS 2. In the fi nal episode of the series, Stan Grant hosted a forum-based debate exploring the portrayal

60 SBS Annual Report 2014

of Indigenous stories in the media, including how media practice shapes social attitudes and affects public policy. The program was a fi nalist in the 2013 Walkley Foundation Awards and is available as an online resource to educate tertiary journalism students about reporting on Indigenous issues.

Songlines on Screen - Screen Australia Songlines on Screen engaged 11 producers from across Australia to create short documentaries about the songlines of Indigenous people. The series was an initiative of the Indigenous Department of Screen Australia in association with NITV, and footage is being archived to ensure ongoing access and control by the songline’s custodians, developing screen production skills in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities through their participation in recording their own stories.

Linking with Indigenous Media SBS remains an active member of the Media Reconciliation Industry Network Group (RING), actively working to develop Indigenous employment opportunities. Meetings are held quarterly and demonstrate industry co-operation with a shared objective to encourage respect and recognition of Indigenous Cultures. All Media RING meetings are reported back to the SBS RAP Committee.

NITV has also developed strong relationships with Indigenous media organisations including the Indigenous Remote Communications Association and the Australian Indigenous Communications Association. These linkages have resulted in valuable joint projects and content collaboration.

In developing the NITV Strategic planning framework, research from

the World Indigenous Television Broadcasters Network has been instructive.

SBS continues its membership with Supply Nation which provides access to a database of Indigenous business suppliers for procurement opportunities. Through this membership, SBS contributes to ensuring small to medium Indigenous businesses have the opportunity to be integrated into the supply chains of Australian companies and Government agencies.

Training and Development The Macquarie University SBS NITV Media Mentorship program, established in 2013, continued to play a key role in assisting Indigenous media students to gain a better understanding of the media sector and enhancing the reputation of NITV and SBS as desirable places to work.

In 2013 four Indigenous media students from Macquarie University completed work experience programs at SBS and NITV, including the opportunity to travel to Darwin to cover the Indigenous Music Awards 2013. In 2014, six students will be placed in the program and will form part of the production crew for broadcasts.

SBS continued its successful Legal Indigenous Cadet program in 2013-14 with its sixth law undergraduate gaining experience in the media law industry while working part-time with SBS Legal.

Funding accessed through the Media RING allowed one Indigenous cadet to complete a journalism cadetship with Living Black in 2013 and three other cadets are currently employed in the program.

SBS Foundation SBS supports a range of Australian charities with an alignment with the SBS Charter through the SBS Foundation. Since its launch in 2009, the program has partnered with over 100 charities and non-profi t organisations spanning the arts, health, sport, environment, multicultural, Indigenous and regional sectors.

In 2013-14, the SBS Foundation supported 13 national and regional charities alongside four long term partnerships with Amy Gillett, Australia for UNHCR, Reconciliation Australia and the Johnny Warren Football Foundation.

Foundations Partners for 2013-2014

National Partners All together now Alpha Autism Endeavour Foundation Landcare Australia Moving Forward Together Sir David Martin Foundation Support Act The Australian Literacy & Numeracy Foundation The Malpa Project Welcome to Australia Youngcare

Regional Partners Holyoake (WA) Leveda Inc. (SA)

61

The SBS Community Advisory Committee (CAC) assists SBS to fulfi l its duty to be aware of, and responsive to, community matters relevant to the Charter, by advising the Board on community needs and opinions, including those of small or newly arrived ethnic groups.

In determining appointments to the Committee and its overall membership, the SBS Board takes into account the diversity of backgrounds of the members, geographical representation and specialised skills and knowledge, including their ability to refl ect the needs and interests of women, youth, the aged and people with disabilities.

Members are selected on the basis that they have an understanding of Australia’s multicultural society, and in particular, have interests relevant to, and an understanding of ethnic and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

During 2013-14, SBS Board members Hass Dellal and Elleni Bereded-Samuel attended CAC meetings to participate in discussions and establish a channel of communication between the CAC and the SBS Board. In April 2014, Ms Bereded-Samuel was appointed as a new CAC member following the end of her term on the SBS Board.

The SBS Community Advisory Committee provided input and held discussions on a range of topics during 2013-14. The outcomes of these discussions were shared with the SBS Board, including:

- SBS Codes of Practice Review

- 2014 SBS Community Engagement Plan

- SBS Radio Schedule Review

- Strategies for engaging young people

- Indigenous people in the multicultural space

- CALD access to disability services

- Employment issues affecting CALD youth

- FECCA Women’s Network and possible collaborations

- Strategies for SBS in the Asian Century

- Save Our SBS survey and report

- SBS codes complaints system

- Proposals for CAC hosted initiatives

- SBS Content Outreach initiatives

- SBS Media Mentorships

- Review of Social Cohesion Research in Australia

- Stakeholder & community engagement

Recommendations requiring a response from the SBS Board:

The CAC referred a survey and report it received from Save Our SBS to the SBS Board. The SBS Board determined that the SBS Executive should respond to Save Our SBS as appropriate.

The CAC recommended holding regional community focus group consultations in Queensland. The SBS Board agreed to support the measure.

Biographies Cedric Manen Cedric is CEO of the Migrant Resource Centre (South Tasmania) Inc., working with refugees and migrants in the areas of settlement, aged care, employment, youth and community development. He has represented Australia at the United Nations High Commission for Refugees Annual Tripartite Consultation on Resettlement for the last three years.

Eugenia Grammatikakis Eugenia is Social Policy and Program Coordinator with Monash City Council and Senior Deputy Chair of the Federation of Ethnic Communities Councils of Australia (FECCA). She has an extensive career working on issues of multiculturalism, social justice and the empowerment of women.

Jihad Dib Jihad is Principal of Punchbowl Boys’ High School, a board member of the Australia Day Council of NSW and sits on the NSW Police Commissioner’s Multicultural Advisory Panel. He has a strong commitment to improving educational and social outcomes for multicultural youth.

62 SBS Annual Report 2014

Community Advisory Committee Members 2013-14 Above from left to right: Professor Andrew Markus, Dr John Lee, Mr Jihad Dib, Mr Hass Dellal (Acting Chair), Mr Cedric Manen, Mr Sam Almaliki, Ms Catherine Scarth, Ms Gail Ker, Ms Elleni Bereded-Samuel, Mr Eugenia Grammatikakis, Mr Mick Gooda (Absent)

Mick Gooda Mick is a descendent of the Gangulu people of central Queensland and is the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner for the Australian Human Rights Commission. He has over 25 years’ experience in advocacy to deliver sustainable results in remote, rural and urban environments.

Dr John Lee John is an Associate Professor and Michael Hintze Fellow at the Centre for International Security Studies, University of Sydney. A political-economist and international relations expert, he believes that successful multiculturalism requires understanding, goodwill and engagement by both existing Australians and newly arrived migrants.

Catherine Scarth Catherine is General Manager of Community and Policy at AMES where she has driven partnerships with employers, government and the community sector. She has over 20 years’ experience in designing, implementing and evaluating a

wide range of innovative social programs and enterprises in Australia and Great Britain.

Professor Andrew Markus Andrew is the Pratt Foundation Research Professor of Jewish Civilisation at Monash University and a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia. He heads the Scanlon Foundation social cohesion research program and has published extensively on Australian immigration and race relations.

Sam Almaliki Sam is Community Engagement and Secretary of the Australian Cricket Diversity Council at Cricket Australia and serves on the Board of the Australia India Business Council - Victoria Chapter. He is a Refugee Week 2014 Ambassador and considers sport and the arts to be valuable avenues for connecting with multicultural communities.

Gail Ker Gail is CEO at Access Community Services Ltd, a not-for-profi t multicultural organisation which provides specialised settlement and support services. She has worked extensively in multicultural affairs positions and is on the board of the Ethnic Communities Council of Queensland.

Elleni Bereded-Samuel* Elleni is Director of Western Health Board and Chair of their Cultural Diversity and Community Advisory Committee. She served for fi ve years on the SBS Board and is recognised as one of the hundred most infl uential African Australians and named a ‘Living Legend 2012” for her work in inspiring migrant and refugee communities to fi nd rewarding careers.

* Appointed in April 2014

63

SBS deepened its engagement with culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities and industry bodies throughout 2013-14 and continued to support a variety of cultural events.

Community SBS Community Engagement activities are aimed at building relationships that support and strengthen SBS by connecting with communities on issues of relevance to the SBS Charter.

SBS on air personalities are working alongside SBS divisions to support creative partnerships and key cultural events which establish stronger connections and engagement between SBS content and the communities we serve.

In August 2013, SBS partnered with the Affi nity Intercultural Foundation to host the SBS Eid Dinner in Sydney, celebrating the end of the month of Ramadan by encouraging cross-cultural and interfaith understanding.

SBS was a main sponsor of the 2013 FECCA Conference: Breaking Down the Barriers - A Strength Based Approach for a Just Society. SBS Managing Director Michael Ebeid delivered a keynote address on the role of SBS in promoting social cohesion in Australia.

To acknowledge the 25th Anniversary of NSW Service for the Treatment and Rehabilitation of Torture and Trauma Survivors (STARTTS), SBS news presenter Anton Enus hosted the December 2013 anniversary function in Granville attended by some 750 supporters.

On Australia Day 2014 SBS news presenter Sarah Abo co-hosted ‘Tidal Rhythms at the Bowl’ at Sydney Myer Music Bowl in Melbourne, a production by Multicultural Arts Victoria in association with Arts Centre Melbourne.

Advance Australia Forum and Awards The Advance Australia Forum and Awards in March 2014 at the Sydney Opera House provided an opportunity to reward and celebrate the journey and achievements of successful Australians. As a media partner SBS shared the stories of these inspiring Australians, building diverse networks, exchanging knowledge and generating ideas.

40th anniversary of the Sydney Opera House SBS played a central role in the 40th anniversary of the opening of the Sydney Opera House in October 2013, which was marked by a series of joint Danish-Australian celebrations and performances. As part of the celebrations, SBS partnered with the Bikuben Foundation and Danish broadcaster DR to present the Crown Prince Couple’s Awards from the Sydney Opera House, with Crown Prince Frederik and Princess Mary presenting the awards.

Community Engagement through Football Football remains the cornerstone of SBS community engagement and the organisation works with Government, education, not-for-profi t and community stakeholders to support football initiatives, including through the Harmony Game School’s Pack (see page 22).

The FIFA World Cup was a huge part of SBS community engagement activities, with SBS Radio teams delivering Outside Broadcasts (OBs) of the matches from 28 community screenings throughout the month (see Appendix 20).

Football events have also included a partnership with the NSW Police Force to host an eight team soccer tournament on Coogee beach with international students and an annual “Harmony Game” at Parliament House where SBS talent took the football pitch against Australia’s politicians to promote harmony and diversity through sport.

Community Leader Lunches SBS community leader lunches provide a forum for communities to share insights, interests and concerns. The two-way conversations offer opportunities for relationship-building with CALD, Indigenous and Interfaith communities and the potential to cultivate partnerships, activities, research and consultations.

SBS Media Mentorships The SBS Media Mentorship program continued in 2013-14 with partnerships in Sydney and Melbourne. Thirteen students from CALD backgrounds participated in the program through Macquarie University, supported by the Ethnic Communities’ Council of NSW. The

64 SBS Annual Report 2014

Macquarie University SBS NITV Media Mentorship program also continued with six new Indigenous students.

In Melbourne, four students from CALD backgrounds took part through Deakin University, supported by the Ethnic Communities’ Council of Victoria. Students have the opportunity to attend media training, workshops, information sessions and events at SBS.

Industry Freeview SBS, together with Australia’s free-to-air broadcasters, is a shareholder in Freeview Australia Ltd and is represented on the Freeview Board. The Freeview Board meets every two months to identify opportunities in the industry to ensure free-to-air viewers are provided with informative, entertaining and accessible content.

International Broadcasting Associations SBS is a member of a number of international public media broadcasting associations, including the Asia-Pacifi c Broadcasting Union (ABU), European Broadcasting

Union (EBU) and the Commonwealth Broadcasting Association (CBA) and works with fellow members to advance the interests of public media and to promote their indispensable contribution to modern society.

International Public Media Organisations SBS executives have dialogue with public media organisations from North America, Asia and Europe to strengthen strategic partnerships, content sharing arrangements and compare approaches to the adoption of broadcasting technology.

Screen Agencies SBS and NITV held workshops with Screen Australia and the State Screen Agencies to develop effi cient pathways for the creation and funding of screen content. The workshops provide a platform for ongoing dialogue between SBS, NITV and Screen Agencies to tackle the challenges facing the sector.

Australian Research Council SBS, together with Screen Australia, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) and the Australian Children’s Television Foundation, has partnered with Queensland University of Technology’s (QUT) Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation (CCI), to undertake an Australian Research Council Linkage Project. The project is examining the current and potential uses of Australian screen content in primary, secondary and tertiary education.

SBS Sponsorships and Partnerships SBS supports industry and community events and initiatives that are relevant to its programs and services through a number of sponsorships and media partnerships (see Appendix 19).

SBS Radio engages with local communities at community events and festivals through outside radio broadcasts (OBs) using our OB units, promotional trailer and marquees (see Appendix 20).

SBS was a media partner at the Africultures Festival in March 2014 and worked with Auburn City Council to engage all countries from the African continent. It was the fi rst SBS community engagement event to bring all SBS Radio African language programs together in celebration of their communities.

65

SBS Media SBS Media performed strongly within a highly competitive market over 2013-14, with year-on-year growth across all sales platforms.

SBS Media commissioned Pollinate to conduct a major research study on what it means to be Australian today and the implications for brands and marketers. The study ‘Who Do We Think We Are?’ was released in May as part of the Vivid Sydney Festival (see page 51).

The fi ndings have been presented to key agencies and clients and have been received with great interest. The fi ndings position SBS Media as a unique provider in the multicultural space.

Advertising Revenue SBS advertising and In-Language revenue experienced 27 per cent growth year on year. This was largely infl uenced by the successful launch of the Hyundai A-League free-to-air as well as the 2014 FIFA World Cup in June 2014.

SBS’s key football events provided additional sponsorship opportunities and multi-platform offerings.

TV sales increased by 28 per cent, online by 34 per cent and radio achieved a 20 per cent growth compared to 2012-13. This was a great achievement for SBS Media, particularly in a year with major sporting events broadcast on other networks.

SBS Distribution SBS Distribution delivers consumer products, content and events that align with SBS programming and activities to increase reach, deepen engagement, generate revenue and extend the SBS brand.

Products include SBS DVDs, CDs, video and music downloads, books and eBooks, magazines and apps developed with several distribution partners including Madman Entertainment, Hardie Grant, Universal Music Australia, iTunes, Pacifi c Magazines and Next Media.

SBS products are made available through Australian retailers including national retail partners Dymocks and ABC Shops, SBS’s online platforms, and digital content providers including iTunes and Google Play.

SBS Distribution experienced a 7.3 per cent increase on total revenue on 2012-13. This has largely been driven by a surge in digital sales which have risen by over 150 per cent from over 300,000 paid downloads.

SBS International Program Sales grew revenue by 46 per cent due to an enhanced content offering and expansion into new territories. SBS commissioned content was represented at MIPTV and MIPCOM markets in France.

The Luke Nguyen franchise has performed particularly well and has now been sold in 147 territories worldwide. Feast magazine sold in excess of 340,000 units during 2013-14, on par with 2012-13 despite a substantial decline in the overall category.

SBS Distribution commenced a new fi lm theatrical partnership with Madman Entertainment to generate revenue from ticket sales and extend the SBS brand into cinemas across Australia. A new partnership with NextMedia has allowed co-branding of the FourFourTwo magazine.

SBS Media Revenue 2013-14

TV 86.4%*

Online 5.7%

Radio 4%

In-Language 3.5%

Other (Production) 0.4%

* Includes World Cup revenues.

66 SBS Annual Report 2014

The SBS Ombudsman received 568 contacts during 2013-14. Of these, 220 were assessed as formal code complaints and were investigated by the SBS Ombudsman.

The remaining 348 were assessed as general complaints and actioned either by response or by referral to the relevant SBS division, or both. Many of these general complaints required a response from the Offi ce of the SBS Ombudsman which sent 99 such responses over the year.

During 2013-14, there was an 83 per cent increase in code complaints received (100 additional complaints) compared to the previous year. This level of code complaints is not dissimilar to other recent years. All of these complaints alleged a breach of the SBS Codes of Practice in relation to content broadcast or published by SBS.

Code complaints were formally investigated by the SBS Ombudsman, who is independent of SBS content producing divisions. Complainants who are dissatisfi ed with the outcome of the SBS Ombudsman’s investigation may refer their complaint to the Australian Communications and Media Authority (the ACMA) for external review.

During 2013-14, 145 code complaints concerned television content broadcast on SBS ONE, 57 concerned content broadcast on SBS 2, 10 concerned SBS Radio content, six concerned SBS online content, and two concerned NITV content.

There were 216 code complaints from individuals and four from community groups. Most complaints (93 per cent) were received electronically either via email or online complaint form.

Types of Code Complaints The inset graph shows the Codes of Practice issues raised in code complaints during 2013-14.

The most commonly raised code issue was prejudice, racism and discrimination, with a total of 84 complaints received about this issue. Of these, 48 complaints concerned the comedy series Legally Brown. The complaints about Legally Brown were of a similar nature and principally alleged that the comedy mocked caucasian Australians to the extent that it was prejudiced against them.

There were 76 complaints about news and current affairs content. Forty of these involved the accuracy, impartiality and balance provisions of the news and current affairs code. There were also 33 complaints about distressing news and current affairs coverage, and three complaints about overseas news programs.

There were 43 complaints about the classifi cation of programs and nine complaints about diversity of views and perspectives in general programming. A number of other

code issues were raised occasionally in complaints: closed captioning (4), advertising and sponsorship (2), privacy (1) and religions (1).

Findings During 2013-14, investigations into 222 code complaints were completed. The SBS Ombudsman upheld 31 complaints and dismissed 191 complaints. All 48 of the Legally Brown complaints were dismissed and the series was found not to have breached the SBS Codes.

Overall the SBS Ombudsman upheld 14 per cent of code complaints, a decrease on the fi gure for the previous year. No complaints were referred to the Complaints Committee during 2013-14.

Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) During the 2013-14, year the ACMA commenced fi ve new investigations of SBS content. Three of the investigations were completed this year and in all cases the ACMA found no breach of the SBS Codes of Practice.

A B C D E F G H I J

38

20

18

15

4

2 1 10.5 0.5

Complaint type A Prejudice, Racism & Discrimination B Classification C Accuracy, Impartiality & Balance D Violence & Distressing Events NACA E Diversity of views & Perspectives F Closed Captions G Overseas News H Advertising & Sponsorship I Privacy

J Religion

Code of Practice Issues - Formal Complaints (%)

67

Portfolio Budget and Additional Estimates Statements 2013-14

Outcome

Provide multilingual and multicultural services that inform, educate and entertain all Australians and in doing so refl ect Australia’s multicultural society.

Total price of the outcome for the year: $379.403 million.

Program 1.1 Television

Objective: Delivering multilingual and multicultural television services that refl ect Australia’s multicultural society.

Deliverables

- Programs aligned with Australia’s multicultural society and perspective (pages 18-51; Appendices 1- 6).

- Broadcasting in languages other than English (Appendices 1, 3, 9, 10).

Key performance indicators

- Accessibility of programs to all Australians (pages 51, 54, 55; Appendices 1, 3, 9, 10, 12).

- Population reach analogue/digital terrestrial transmission sites: Target - 96 per cent; Actual - 97 per cent.

- Number of hours of subtitled programs: Target - 3,076 hours; Actual: 3,216 hours. (SBS ONE, SBS 2 and NITV - page 51; Appendix 10).

- Number of hours locally commissioned programs broadcast (fi rst run): Target - 100 hours; Actual - 246 hours (SBS ONE, SBS 2 and NITV - Appendix 5).

Total price of program for the year: $247.528 million.

Program 1.2 Radio

Objective: Delivering multilingual and multicultural radio services that refl ect Australia’s multicultural society.

Deliverables

- Programs aligned with Australia’s multicultural society and perspective (pages 30-31).

- Broadcasting in languages other than English (Appendices 1, 7, 8).

Key performance indicators

- Listener and community feedback (pages 51, 67).

- Audience surveys (pages 31, 51).

- Percentage of broadcasts in languages other than English: Target - 86 per cent; Actual - 95 per cent (Appendices 1, 7, 8).

Total price of program for the year: $46.573 million.

Program 1.3 Analogue Transmission and Distribution

Objective: To make SBS analogue television and radio available to all Australians.

Deliverables

- Maintain availability of analogue signal in line with analogue switch-off timetable (pages 54-55).

Key performance indicators

- Measure of fault free transmission time (by fault management system reported daily and monthly, including but not limited to level of transmitter power): (page 55).

- Logging and response to viewer calls regarding transmission: (page 55).

- Aggregate performance measured by availability of analogue service: Target - 99 per cent; Actual - 99.92 per cent

- Television population reach for terrestrial services (of remaining analogue service areas): Target - 65 per cent; Actual - N/A. Analogue services were provided to the remaining analogue service areas until digital switchover.

Price of program for the year: $3.287 million.

68 SBS Annual Report 2014

Program 1.4 Digital Television Transmission and Distribution

Objective: To make SBS Digital Television available to all Australians.

Deliverables

- Maintaining and improving the availability of SBS’s digital transmissions (pages 54-55).

- Extending the reach of SBS’s digital network (pages 54-55).

Key performance indicators

- Measure of fault-free transmission time (by fault management system reported daily and monthly, including but not limited to level of transmitter power): (page 55).

- Logging and response to viewer calls regarding transmission: (page 55).

- Availability of digital television transmission services (fully managed services): Target - 99.82 per cent; Actual: 99.94 per cent.

- Population reach for terrestrial services (excluding Satellite): Target - 96 per cent; Actual - 97 per cent.

Price of program for the year $80.300 million.

Program 1.5 Digital Radio Transmission and Distribution

Objective: To make SBS Digital Radio available to all Australians.

Deliverables

- To implement Digital Audio Broadcast of SBS radio services (coverage in the fi ve mainland capital cities) (pages 54-55).

Key performance indicators

- Measure of fault-free transmission time (by fault management system reported daily and monthly, including but not limited to level of transmitter power): (page 55).

- Logging and response to viewer calls regarding transmission: (page 55).

- Percentage of Australian population reached by digital radio: Target - 60 per cent; Actual - 51 per cent*.

- Aggregate performance measured by availability of digital radio signal: Target - 99.98 per cent; Actual - 100 per cent.

- Number of services for digital radio: Target - 5; Actual - 5.

Price of program for the year: $1.715 million.

* Figure readjusted from previous years based on revised data source.

69

SB B S S S Co C rp rp rpora at a e

Financial Results The Corporation and its controlled entities, ended the 2013-14 fi nancial year with a surplus of $0.43 million.

The Corporation’s total assets increased during the fi nancial year from $256.801 million to $281.31 million.

The level of contributed equity by Government has decreased to $110.406 million.

SBS generated 28.4 per cent of its total operating revenue from the sale of goods and services in 2013-14.

Government Revenue In 2013-14 SBS received a total appropriation of $267.005 million from the Australian Government. In 2014-15 SBS will receive a total of $287.074 million from the Australian Government.

Major Investing and Financing Activities SBS actively manages its fi nances. This involves preparation of estimates for appropriation and equity injection funding taking into account movements in the infl ation parameter applicable to SBS. Cash holdings

are monitored throughout the year and where funds are not immediately required for operational activities, investments are made.

All investments have been made in accordance with the investing requirements of the Special Broadcasting Service Act 1991 and the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997.

On 1 June 2009, SBS entered into a fully amortising loan with the Commonwealth. The amount of $15 million had a loan period of 5 years and the fi nal payment of $3.129 million was made in 2013-14.

On 6 May 2014, SBS entered into a fully amortising loan with the Commonwealth to meet short-term cash requirements in relation to the 2014 World Cup. The amount of $20 million has a loan period of 87 days.

Level of Overhead SBS regularly conducts benchmarking exercises to ensure it is meeting or exceeding industry standards in regard to expenditure on corporate overheads. In 2013-14 the

percentage of SBS’s total budget spent on administrative overheads was 8.0 per cent, maintaining the low level of the previous year.

This refl ects the concerted effort by SBS to improve effi ciencies in this area to deliver more funds to content creation. Of total funding from commercial revenue and government appropriation, 47 per cent went towards local and imported content in 2013-14, an increase on the 46 per cent in 2012-13.

SBS Business In October 2009 SBS formed, with the ABC, the National DAB Licence Company Ltd. The company was formed in order to obtain a category 3 digital radio multiplex transmitter licence as provided for by section 102E of the Radiocommunications Act 1992. SBS and the ABC are the only shareholders in the company.

Related Entity Transactions SBS has procedures in place to identify and report on any related party transactions. These are set out in note 15 to the SBS Financial Statements that follow.

Operating Revenue

Government Appropriation 70.3% Goods & Services 28.4%

Interest 0.9%

Other 0.4%

200

150

100

50

109.6

Employees Suppliers Program

amortisation

Depreciation Interest

123.6

43.9 47.3

11.4 12.4

0.3 0.3

170.6

195.3

Expenditure By Classifi cation ($m)

2012-13 2013-14

70 SBS Annual Report 2014

Audit and Risk Sub-Committee

Member Position Meetings Attended

Patricia Azarias Chair 3

Jacqueline Hey Director 3

Daryl Karp* Director 1

* Daryl Karp was appointed to the committee in May 2014 and attended fi rst meeting on 12 June 2014.

Codes Review Sub-Committee

Member Position Meetings Attended*

Daryl Karp Chair 6

William Lenehan Member 5

Dorothy West Member 5

*Includes circulars.

Remuneration Sub-Committee

Member Position Meetings Attended*

Bulent Hass Dellal Chair 1

Michael Ebeid Managing Director 1

Jacqueline Hey Director 1

William Lenehan Director 1

SBS Board Sub-Committees The SBS Board has three standing sub-committees for considering a wide range of detailed issues and making recommendations for consideration by the Board.

Audit and Risk Sub-Committee The SBS Audit and Risk Sub-committee met three times during the year and considered the fi ndings and recommendations of audits conducted by both the ANAO and the internal auditors, Ernst & Young.

The Audit and Risk Committee also considered and gave direction on a wide range of issues including approval of the annual internal audit program, investment and fi nancing activities, risk management and strategy for the fi nancial statements audit.

Codes Review Sub-committee The Codes Review Sub-committee considers proposed amendments and other issues relating to the SBS Codes of Practice and SBS’s internal Editorial Guidelines. Six meetings were held during the year.

Remuneration Sub-committee The Remuneration Sub-committee decides the SBS policies for remuneration of the Managing Director and the SBS Executive. The Sub-committee met once during the year.

71

Statement of Governance SBS business practices are governed by clear delegations of authority; project (program) management; policies for statutory compliance; codes of conduct and ethics; review processes; budget information linked to all planning processes; and regular monitoring and reporting to the SBS Board and its sub-committees.

Good corporate governance at SBS is also based on an acceptance by all staff that the highest standards of integrity and ethical behaviour are expected of them, as well as transparency and consistency in all their actions.

SBS Codes of Practice Review SBS revised the SBS Codes of Practice in 2013-14. The Codes of Practice set out the principles and policies SBS uses in fulfi lling its Charter obligations.

The revisions took into account developments within SBS and changes in the media landscape and industry practice. The revised Codes of Practice were approved by the SBS Board, and notifi ed to the Australian Communications and Media Authority. The 2014 SBS Codes of Practice came into effect on 3 March 2014.

The main change was to the Television Classifi cation code. SBS brought forward the time zone for programs classifi ed MA15+ from 9:00pm to 8:30pm. This enhances SBS’s ability to support the viewing preferences of its audiences through greater fl exibility in the scheduling of key programs, and is in response to the changing media consumption of audiences and widespread availability of parental controls in the transition to digital television.

SBS Accounting Manual SBS’s fi nancial policies and procedures are contained in the SBS Accounting Manual which is available to all staff on the SBS Intranet. Updates occur frequently throughout the year.

SBS Risk Management Plan The SBS Risk Management Plan and risk assessment identifi es and addresses the major risks and opportunities associated with SBS activities. The SBS Risk Management Plan is regularly revised and in 2013-14 SBS processes were subject to an independent external review by Deloitte to ensure SBS is meeting better practice. The goals behind risk management at SBS are to:

- provide an assurance that SBS has identifi ed its highest-risk exposures and has taken steps to properly manage these;

- ensure that SBS’s business planning processes include a focus on areas where risk management is needed;

- ensure the integration of the various and many risk control measures that SBS already has in place;

- be comprehensive and effective.

The SBS Audit and Risk Committee receives regular reports on the management of identifi ed ‘highest risks’ facing SBS, with identifi cation of risks allowing for the redirection/refocus of resources to address key issues.

SBS Disaster Recovery Plan and Business Continuity Plan During 2013-14 SBS updated its Business Continuity Plan (BCP) to ensure it refl ects current technology and resources capability. A BCP maintenance plan is in place to ensure that is tested and updated periodically to ensure full business recovery in the event of a full or partial loss to the SBS premises. SBS also has a Disaster Recovery Plan and a Disaster Recovery site located offsite, to enable continued operations in the event of a disaster impacting on its broadcasting capability from its Sydney headquarters.

SBS Fraud Control Plan The SBS Fraud Control Plan is based on a fraud risk assessment (conducted using the methodology outlined in the International Standard for Risk Management, AS/NZS/ISO 31000). In 2013-14, the SBS Fraud Control Plan was subject to an independent external review by Deloitte to ensure SBS is meeting better practice. The Board is satisfi ed that SBS has in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection procedures and processes and that these comply with the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines.

External and Internal Audit The audit of SBS’s fi nancial statements is carried out by the Australian National Audit Offi ce (ANAO). The ANAO gave an unqualifi ed opinion on the 2013-14 fi nancial statements of SBS. During the year, SBS participated in a benchmarking study conducted by Comcover (an agency of the Department of Finance and Deregulation) on Risk Management Practices and achieved an excellent overall performance rating.

The Internal Audit program was conducted by Ernst & Young on a contract basis. Ernst & Young performed audits in accordance with the audit plan approved by the SBS Audit and Risk Committee. In all cases, the results were satisfactory. Where applicable, recommendations for improvements to the control environment were brought to management’s attention and have been addressed.

Audits conducted in 2013-14 were: Charter Obligations Management and Corporate Governance; Strategic Planning; Project Management; Online Management; World Cup Risk Management; Television Program Inventory Management; Payroll; Advertising Sales and Delegations.

72 SBS Annual Report 2014

Indemnities and Insurance Premiums for Offi cers As part of its general insurance protection, SBS has a Directors and Offi cers Liability Insurance Policy in place. The cost of this policy for 2013-14 was $35,309 (GST excluded).

Ministerial Directions and Notifi cations SBS has been notifi ed that the following general policies of the Australian Government apply to SBS: Competitive Neutrality Arrangements; Cost Recovery by Government Agencies; Guidelines for the Management of Foreign Exchange Risk and Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines. These are all notifi cations continuing from previous fi nancial years.

In 2006-07, the Finance Minister issued a Ministerial Direction under section 16(1)(c) of the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act requiring SBS (and all other authorities in the general government sector) to provide a Compliance Report on legislative compliance and fi nancial sustainability. No ministerial directions were issued under the SBS Act.

Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (WHS Act) SBS is committed to fostering a positive safety and wellbeing culture, and to ensuring the health and safety of all employees, contractors, and members of the public who may be affected by our work.

As part of SBS’s proactive approach to the safety governance framework, a comprehensive WHS analysis was undertaken in 2013-14 to assess SBS against legislative compliance and to ensure the continuous improvement of SBS safety systems.

This forward strategy has seen SBS’s injury frequency and claims costs fall this year, relative both to the previous year and comparable agencies.

Health and Safety Committees (HSCs) SBS’s HSCs provide a forum for co-operative engagement between employees and management to effectively address health and safety matters. The Sydney and Melbourne HSCs meet on a quarterly basis and contribute to the development of WHS procedures, assist with risk identifi cation measures and promote safety awareness throughout SBS.

Work Groups / Health and Safety Representatives (HSRs) SBS has seven Work Groups. Each Work Group has an elected/selected Health and Safety Representative (HSR) who assists the Work Group in hazard identifi cation and represents the Work Group on the Health and Safety Committee.

Incident notifi cation to Comcare There were no (0) incidents resulting in a serious injury which required notifi cation to Comcare.

Investigations SBS has not been investigated under the WHS Act, nor received any notices given under Part 10 of the WHS Act.

Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 SBS seeks to mitigate the adverse environmental impacts of its business activities through a number of sustainability initiatives including recycling waste, energy effi ciency and water conservation measures and the purchase of products made from recycled materials. Energy effi cient lighting systems installed as part of the agile workplace project in Sydney while the upgrade of central rack room air conditioning enabled the installation of new air conditioning equipment that allows free cooling when external ambient conditions permit.

Commissioning of the new Building Management System to CIBSIE standards continued throughout the year. The system is designed to minimise energy use by maximising the operational effi ciency of building plant and has also allowed much greater use of the free cooling system.

These initiatives have seen energy consumption across SBS’s Sydney and Melbourne premises decline by up to 7.4 per cent over the last fi ve years despite an increase in demand on the facility. In 2013-14 the general offi ce recycling program recycled a total of 107.8 tonnes of general waste, 9.8 tonnes of paper and 13.3 tonnes of cardboard. Approximately 82 per cent of all waste generated by SBS was recovered, diverted from landfi ll or re-used.

In addition 6,040 kg of steel, 199 kg of aluminium and 3,803 kg of e-waste were recycled and separate programs to recycle toner cartridges, mobile phones and phone batteries, redundant electrical and data cabling, fl uorescent lighting tubes and building waste generated through building refurbishment work continued.

Sustainability SBS continues to purchase recycled paper for printing, photocopying, hand towels and toilet paper and continues to purchase products made from recycled materials for pin boards, acoustic panelling and furniture.

73

74 SBS Annual Report 2014

75

Ind de epe end d den e tt A Au udi d to to to or’ r s s Re e epo p p rt r

76 SBS Annual Report 2014

77

Sta at atem men n nt by by tthe he D D Dir irec ctor r rs, C Chie e ef f E Exec c cutiv ive e a and d d C Chief ff Fiina n n nc ncia al l O Offfi fice e er r

In our opinion, the attached fi nancial statements for the year ended 30 June 2014 are based on properly maintained fi nancial records and give a true and fair view of the matters required by the Finance Minister’s Orders made under the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997, as amended.

In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Corporation will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable.

This statement is made in accordance with a resolution of the directors.

Dr Bulent Hass Dellal OAM Michael Ebeid James Taylor

Acting Chairman Managing Director Chief Financial Offi cer

22 August 2014

78 SBS Annual Report 2014

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Notes 2014

$’000

2013 $’000

Net cost of services Expenses

Employee benefi ts 3(a) 123,578 109,588

Suppliers 3(b) 195,301 170,562

Program inventory amortisation 3(c) 47,267 43,884

Depreciation and amortisation 3(d) 12,421 11,448

Finance costs 3(e) 288 304

Write-down and impairment of assets 3(f) 548 75

Foreign exchange losses 3(g) - 35

Total expenses 379,403 335,896

Less:

Own-source income

Own-source revenue

Sale of goods and rendering of services 4(a) 102,269 77,147

Interest 4(b) 3,472 4,331

Rental income 4(c) 1,045 1,071

Royalties 4(d) 4,451 4,046

Other revenue 4(e) 1,545 2,892

Total own-source revenue 112,782 89,487

Gains

Gains from sale of assets 4(f) - 1

Foreign exchange gains 4(g) 46 -

Total gains 46 1

Total own-source income 112,828 89,488

Net cost of services 266,575 246,408

Revenue from Government 5 267,005 246,943

Surplus (Defi cit) before income tax on continuing operations 430 535

Income tax benefi t (expense) - -

Surplus (Defi cit) after income tax on continuing operations 430 535

Surplus (Defi cit) after income tax 430 535

Surplus (Defi cit) attributable to the Australian Government 430 535

Sta at atem men n nt of of C Co omp pr pr p eh hensi s s ve e In nc com me e for the period ended 30 June 2014

79

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Notes 2014

$’000

2013 $’000

Other Comprehensive Income

Items not subject to subsequent reclassifi cation to net cost of services

Changes in asset revaluation surplus 11,514 -

Total other comprehensive income before income tax 11,514 -

Income tax expense - other comprehensive income - -

Total other comprehensive income after income tax 11,514 -

Total comprehensive income 11,944 535

Sta at atem men n nt of of C Co omp p pr reh hensi s s ve e In nc ncom me e (c (c (con n ntinu nue ed d) for the period ended 30 June 2014

80 SBS Annual Report 2014

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Assets

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 7(a) 12,048 19,127

Trade and other receivables 7(b) 28,306 18,233

Investments accounted for using the equity method 7(c) - -

Other investments 7(d) 21,190 23,333

Total fi nancial assets 61,544 60,693

Non-fi nancial assets

Land and buildings 8(a) 73,695 64,691

Plant and equipment 8(b) 30,989 32,076

Intangibles 8(d) 19,227 16,428

Inventories 8(f) 75,360 63,935

Other non-fi nancial assets 8(g) 20,495 18,978

Total non-fi nancial assets 219,766 196,108

Total assets 281,310 256,801

Liabilities

Payables

Suppliers 9(a) 21,856 22,080

Other payables 9(b) 17,047 21,578

Total payables 38,903 43,658

Interest bearing liabilities

Loans 10(a) 20,105 3,011

Leases 10(b) 554 707

Total interest bearing liabilities 20,659 3,718

Provisions

Employee provisions 11(a) 22,087 21,074

Other provisions 11(b) 1,120 1,138

Total provisions 23,207 22,212

Total liabilities 82,769 69,588

Net assets 198,541 187,213

Equity Contributed equity 110,406 111,022

Reserves 60,390 48,876

Retained surplus 27,745 27,315

Total equity 198,541 187,213

S Stat attem m e e en e tt offf Fin nan n nci c al al Po ositttion n as at 30 June 2014

81

St Stat attem m e e en e tt offf Ch han ng ges s iin Eq q qui u u ty y for the period ended 30 June 2014

Retained earnings

Asset

revaluation surplus Contributed equity/capital

Total equity

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 27,315 26,780 48,876 48,876 111,022 108,122 187,213 183,778

Comprehensive income Surplus (Defi cit) for the period 430 535 - - - - 430 535

Other comprehensive income - Asset Revaluation - - 11,514 - - - 11,514 -

Total comprehensive income 430 535 11,514 - - - 11,944 535

Total comprehensive income attributable to the Australian Government 430 535 11,514 - - - 11,944 535

Transactions with owners Distributions to owners

Returns of Capital (i) - - - - (616) - (616) -

Contributions by owners

Equity injection - - - - - 2,900 - 2,900

Total transactions with owners - - - - (616) 2,900 (616) 2,900

Closing balance as at 30 June 27,745 27,315 60,390 48,876 110,406 111,022 198,541 187,213

Closing balance attributable to the Australian Government 27,745 27,315 60,390 48,876 110,406 111,022 198,541 187,213

(i) An amount of $0.616m was returned to Government in 2014 for unutilised digital restack funding. This amount was received and recognised as Appropriation Revenue in 2013. The amount returned in 2014 has therefore been recognised as a Return of Capital. The return of this amount was made in line with Government policy to fund only amounts required for the conversion to digital transmission.

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

82 SBS Annual Report 2014

C Cash sh s F Flo o l w w Stttat a e em me en e t for the period ended 30 June 2014

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Operating Activities

Cash received

Receipts from Government 269,772 248,476

Sale of goods and rendering of services 91,294 82,678

Interest 3,741 5,066

Net GST received 12,438 11,030

Income tax received - 79

Total cash received 377,245 347,329

Cash used

Employees (121,887) (109,506)

Suppliers (266,793) (227,846)

Borrowing costs (164) (289)

Refund of Government funding (1,612) (539)

Total cash used (390,456) (338,180)

Net cash from (used by) operating activities 12 (13,211) 9,149

Investing Activities

Cash received

Proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment - 6

Investments 178,391 160,926

Total cash received 178,391 160,932

Cash used

Purchase of property, plant and equipment (12,162) (7,146)

Investments (176,328) (162,323)

Total cash used (188,490) (169,469)

Net cash used by investing activities (10,099) (8,537)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

83

C Cash sh s F Flo o l w w Stttat a e em me en e t (c (c ( o ontiin n nue ed)) for the period ended 30 June 2014

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Financing Activities

Cash received

Proceeds from borrowings 10(a) 20,000 -

Contributed equity - 2,900

Total cash received 20,000 2,900

Cash used

Repayment of borrowings (3,000) (3,000)

Other - Return of Capital (Contributed Equity) (616) -

Finance lease payments (153) (107)

Total cash used (3,769) (3,107)

Net cash from (used by) fi nancing activities 16,231 (207)

Net increase (decrease) in cash held (7,079) 405

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 19,127 18,722

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 7(a) 12,048 19,127

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

84 SBS Annual Report 2014

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

By Type

Commitments receivable

Transmission facilities (ii) 463,378 463,910

Lease rental income (iii) 2,305 3,399

Advertising and sponsorship 17,937 12,673

Net GST recoverable on commitments 52,107 51,213

Other commitments (iv) 3,304 4,538

Total commitments receivable 539,031 535,733

Commitments payable

Capital commitments

Land and buildings (i) (26) (208)

Property, plant and equipment (i) (854) (915)

Total capital commitments (880) (1,123)

Other commitments

Transmission facilities (ii) (528,816) (517,253)

Operating leases (iii) (6,930) (9,093)

Other commitments (iv) (164,225) (138,272)

Total other commitments (699,971) (664,618)

Total commitments payable (700,851) (665,741)

Net commitments by type (161,820) (130,008)

By Maturity

Commitments receivable

Operating lease income

Within 1 year 1,181 1,131

Between 1 to 5 years 1,124 2,268

More than 5 years - -

Total operating lease income 2,305 3,399

Other commitments receivable

Within 1 year 112,629 96,396

Between 1 to 5 years 291,181 265,894

More than 5 years 132,916 170,044

Total other commitments receivable 536,726 532,334

Total commitments receivable 539,031 535,733

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

S Sch he hedu ule le o of C C Com mm m mit i m me ent nts as at 30 June 2014

85

S Sche he h du ule le o of C C Com mm m mit i m me ent nts (c (c (con ntiin nu n ed ed d)) as at 30 June 2014

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Commitments payable

Capital commitments

Within 1 year (880) (1,123)

Between 1 to 5 years - -

More than 5 years - -

Total capital commitments (880) (1,123)

Operating lease commitments

Within 1 year (2,616) (2,646)

Between 1 to 5 years (4,313) (6,447)

More than 5 years - -

Total operating lease commitments (6,929) (9,093)

Other commitments

Within 1 year (158,129) (131,437)

Between 1 to 5 years (358,005) (319,628)

More than 5 years (176,908) (204,460)

Total other commitments (693,042) (655,525)

Total commitments payable (700,851) (665,741)

Net commitments by maturity (161,820) (130,008)

Nature of Capital Commitments

Note: Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant.

(i) Capital commitments consists of amounts in respect of television and radio broadcasting equipment, and building improvements.

(ii) Transmission facilities commitments include future expenditure and amounts receivable for digital transmission services.

(iii) Nature of lease General description of leasing arrangement:

- Leases for offi ce accommodation: Lease payments are subject to annual increases in line with the Consumer Price Index or Market Value. The leases are renewable.

- Leases of computer equipment: The leases for computer equipment are for a period of three or four years. Options to extend leased terms are available at discounted prices.

- Leases of motor vehicles: No contingent rentals exist, and no renewal or purchase options are available.

(iv) Other commitments consist of amounts in respect of program, production, operational costs, and net GST recoverable from the taxation authority, which relate to these commitments.

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

86 SBS Annual Report 2014

S Sch he hedu ule le o of C C Con ntin n nge g n nc ncie es as at 30 June 2014

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Contingent assets

Claims for damages or costs - -

Total contingent assets - -

Contingent liabilities

Claims for damages or costs - 2

Total contingent liabilities - 2

Net contingent liabilities - 2

Details of each class of contingent liabilities and contingent assets listed above are disclosed in Note 13, along with information on signifi cant remote contingencies that cannot be quantifi ed.

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

87

N Note e t s to to o tthe h F F Fin nan n a c ci c all S Sta ate e eme e m m ntt n s s s Table of Contents

Note Description Page

1 Summary of signifi cant accounting policies 89

2 Events after the reporting period 98

3 Expenses 99

4 Own-source income 101

5 Revenue from Government 102

6 Fair value measurements 103

7 Financial assets 108

8 Non-fi nancial assets 111

9 Payables 118

10 Interest bearing liabilities 119

11 Provisions 120

12 Cash fl ow reconciliation 121

13 Contingent assets and liabilities 122

14 Directors remuneration 123

15 Related party disclosures 123

16 Senior executive remuneration 124

17 Remuneration of auditors 128

18 Financial instruments 128

19 Financial assets reconciliation 133

20 Reporting of outcomes 133

88 SBS Annual Report 2014

1. Summary of signifi cant accounting policies

The fi nancial statements are those of the Special Broadcasting Service Corporation (the “Corporation”).

(a) Objectives of the Special Broadcasting Service Corporation

The Corporation is an Australian Government controlled entity established under the Special Broadcasting Service Act 1991. It is a not-for-profi t entity. It is structured to meet the following outcome:

“Provide multilingual, multicultural and Indigenous radio, television and digital media services that inform, educate and entertain all Australians and, in doing so, refl ect Australia’s diverse society”.

The continued existence of the Corporation in its present form and with its present programs is dependent on Government policy and on continuing funding by Parliament for the Corporation’s administration and programs.

(b) Basis of preparation of the fi nancial statements

The fi nancial statements are general purpose fi nancial statements and are required by clause 1(b) of Schedule 1 to the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 (CAC Act).

The fi nancial statements have been prepared in accordance with the Finance Minister’s Orders (FMOs) for the reporting periods ending on or after 1 July 2011, Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB), that apply for the reporting period.

The fi nancial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis, and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the fi nancial position.

The fi nancial statements are presented in Australian dollars, which is the Corporation’s functional currency, and values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars unless otherwise specifi ed. Where applicable, comparative fi gures are restated to refl ect the current year presentation of the fi nancial statements.

Unless an alternative treatment is specifi cally required by an accounting standard or the FMOs, assets and liabilities are recognised in the statement of fi nancial position when and only when it is probable that future economic benefi ts will fl ow to the Corporation or a future sacrifi ce of economic benefi ts will be required and the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. However, assets and liabilities arising under executory contracts are not recognised unless required by an accounting standard. Liabilities and assets that are unrecognised in the balance sheet are reported in the schedule of commitments or the schedule of contingencies.

Unless an alternative treatment is specifi cally required by an accounting standard, income and expenses are recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income when and only when the fl ow, consumption or loss of economic benefi ts has occurred and can be reliably measured.

(c) Business combinations and principles of consolidation

Business combinations

Acquisitions of businesses are accounted for in line with AASB 3 “Business Combinations”, and consolidated in line with AASB 127 “Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements” from the date of acquisition. The effect of all transactions within the economic entities and inter-entity balances are eliminated in full. The excess of purchase consideration for the acquisition of controlled entities or business over the fair value of their net identifi able assets on acquisition is recognised as goodwill - see Note 8(d).

Acquisitions involving entities under common control

A business combination which involves entities or businesses which are ultimately controlled by the same party are considered “common control” transactions which are accounted for at book value. This is done on the basis that the assets and liabilities are being moved from one part of the Group to another.

On 1 July 2012 the Corporation acquired its wholly owned subsidiary, SBS Subscription TV Ltd, which was accounted for as an acquisition involving an entity under common control. SBS Subscription TV Ltd was voluntarily liquidated on 21 January 2014. The fi nancial statements are those of the Corporation only.

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(d) Signifi cant accounting judgements and estimates

In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, the Corporation has made the following judgements that have the most signifi cant impact on the amounts recorded in the fi nancial statements:

 Valuation of land, buildings, plant and equipment as detailed in note 1(v).

 Program amortisation as detailed in note 1(z).

 Long service leave as detailed in note 1(j).

 Redundancy provision as detailed in note 1(j).

No accounting assumptions or estimates have been identifi ed that have a signifi cant risk of causing a material adjustment to carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next reporting period.

(e) New Australian Accounting Standards

Adoption of new Australian Accounting Standard requirements

No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date stated in the standard.

The following adopted requirements have affected the amounts reported in the current or prior periods or are estimated to have a fi nancial effect in future reporting periods.

AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement. AASB 13 has been issued to ensure consistency of fair value measurement and disclosure. It provides a single set of rules for how to measure fair value but does not specify when fair value should be applied as specifi ed in the relevant Standard

and the FMOs. The fair value hierarchy included within AASB 139 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement is extended to all measures of fair value. This requires entities to classify fair value measurements into three levels of the fair value hierarchy. AASB 13 requires a number of signifi cant new detailed disclosures for assets and liabilities carried at fair value. Comparatives are not required for the year ended 30 June 2014.

AASB 2011-4 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards to Remove Individual Key Management Personnel Disclosure Requirements. This removes the requirements to include individual key management personnel disclosures in the notes to the fi nancial statements. The Corporation is governed by the disclosure requirements as set in the FMOs, hence its disclosure requirements will be governed accordingly.

AASB 2012-2 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards Disclosures - Offsetting Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities (June 2012). AASB 7 is amended to increase the disclosures about offset positions, including the gross position and the nature of the arrangements.

AASB 119 Employee Benefi ts. AASB 119 (reissued) introduces a single approach for the recognition and measurement of defi ned benefi t plans although this change is not applicable to the Corporation. Of greater signifi cance to the Corporation are the amended defi nitions of short-term and other long-term employee

benefi ts. The change in defi nition shifts the focus to when the benefi t is expected to be wholly settled rather than when it is due to be settled. This has implications for measurement of the annual leave benefi t, on a discounted basis. It also changes the presentation of employee benefi t amounts for key management personnel. While measurement of the liability may change, presentation of annual leave as a current liability will not.

AASB 2011-8 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 13. This Standard amends existing fair value defi nitions, measurement requirements, disclosures and guidance located in other standards to ensure consistency with AASB 13.

AASB 2011-10 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 119 (September 2011). This Standard makes consequential amendments to other standards arising from the reissued AASB 119.

AASB 2012-7 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from Reduced Disclosure Requirements. The objective of this Standard is to make amendments to: AASB 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures; AASB 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities; AASB 101 Presentation of Financial Statements; and AASB 127 Separate Financial Statements. Only minor impacts are expected.

AASB 2012-10 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards - Transition Guidance and Other Amendments. The objective of this Standard is to make amendments to: AASB 1 First-time Adoption of Australian Accounting Standards; AASB 5 Non-current Assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations; AASB 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures; AASB 8 Operating Segments; AASB 10 Consolidated Financial Statements; AASB 11 Joint Arrangements; AASB 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities; AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement; AASB 101 Presentation of Financial Statements; and AASB 102 Inventories. This change takes effect for reporting periods ending on or after 1 January 2013. The major impact on the Corporation, being a not-for-profi t organisation is to defer the implementation of AASBs 10, 11 and 12 until 1 January 2014.

90 SBS Annual Report 2014

Other new, revised or amending standards or interpretations that are applicable to the current reporting period did not have a material fi nancial impact, and are not expected to have a future fi nancial impact on the Corporation.

Future Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

The following new standards, amendments to standards or interpretations have been issued by the AASB but are effective for future reporting periods. The impact of adopting these pronouncements, when effective, will not have a material fi nancial impact on the Corporation’s fi nancial statements.

AASB 10 Consolidated Financial Statements. AASB 10 introduces a new approach to determining which investees should be consolidated. An investor controls an investee when the investor is exposed, or has rights, to variable returns from its involvement with the investee and has the ability to affect those returns through its power over the investee. It is expected to have minimal impact on the Corporation. This takes effect for not-for-profi t entities for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014.

AASB 11 Joint Arrangements. This standard defi nes a joint arrangement as one where two or more parties are in a contractual agreement which binds them and gives them joint control over the joint arrangement. The standard distinguishes between joint operations whereby the controlling parties have contractual rights and obligations to individual assets and liabilities and joint ventures whereby the controlling parties have rights to the net assets of the arrangement. This takes effect for not-for-profi t entities for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014.

AASB 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities. AASB 12 contains the disclosure requirements for entities that have interests in subsidiaries, joint arrangements, associates and/or unconsolidated structured entities. This takes effect for not-for-profi t entities for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014.

AASB 128 Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures (2011). Limited amendments have been made, including the application of AASB 5 Non-current Assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations to interests in associates and joint ventures and how to account for changes in interests and joint ventures. This takes effect for not-for-profi t entities for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014.

AASB 2011-7 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from the Consolidation and Joint Venture Standards. This standard gives effect to many consequential changes to a number of standards arising from the new consolidation and joint arrangements standards. This takes effect for not-for-profi t entities for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014.

AASB 2012-3 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards - Offsetting Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities (June 2012). The amendments to AASB 132 clarify when an entity has a legally enforceable right to set off fi nancial liabilities permitting entities to present balances net on the balance sheet. This takes effect for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014.

AASB 1055 Budgetary Reporting. This standard requires reporting of budgetary information by not-for-profi t entities within the General Government Sector (however, comparative information is not required). In particular the original budget presented to Parliament, variance of actuals from budget; and explanations of signifi cant variances are required. For-profi t entities are excluded, as are Public Financial Corporations, Public Non-Financial Corporations and universities. This takes effect for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 July 2014.

AASB 9 Financial Instruments. AASB 9 incorporates the classifi cation and measurement requirements for fi nancial liabilities, and the recognition and derecognition requirements for fi nancial instruments, in addition to the classifi cation and measurement requirements for fi nancial assets (representing the fi rst phase of a three phase project to replace AASB 139). This takes effect for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2015.

AASB 2010-7 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB (December 2010). This adds the requirements in AASB 139 in relation to the derecognition of fi nancial assets and fi nancial liabilities to AASB 9. AASB 9 retains but simplifi es the mixed measurement model and establishes two primary measurement categories for fi nancial assets; amortised cost and fair value. The basis of classifi cation depends on the entity’s business model and the contractual cash fl ow characteristics of the fi nancial asset. The Standard applies to reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2015.

Other new, revised or amending standards or interpretations that were issued and are applicable to future reporting periods are not expected to have a material fi nancial impact on the Corporation in future reporting periods.

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(f) Revenues

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when:

- the risks and rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyer;

- the Corporation retains no managerial involvement or effective control over the goods;

- the revenue and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and

- it is probable that the economic benefi ts associated with the transaction will fl ow to the Corporation.

Revenue from rendering of services is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date. The revenue is recognised when:

- the amount of revenue, stage of completion and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and

- the probable economic benefi ts associated with the transaction will fl ow to the Corporation.

The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to the proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction.

Receivables for goods and services, which generally have 30 or 45 day terms are recognised at the nominal amounts due, less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at the end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability is no longer probable.

Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest method in line with AASB 139 “Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement”.

Revenues from Government

Amounts appropriated for departmental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) are recognised as Revenue from Government when the entity gains control of the appropriation, except for certain amounts that relate to activities that are reciprocal in nature, in which case revenue is recognised only when it has been earned. Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts.

Funding received or receivable from the Department of Communications (appropriated to the agency as a CAC Act body payment item for payment to the Corporation) is recognised as Revenue from Government by the CAC Act body unless the funding is in the nature of an equity injection or a loan.

Parental Leave Payments Scheme

Amounts received under the Parental Leave Payments Scheme by the Corporation not yet paid to employees were presented gross as cash and a liability (payable). The total amount received under the scheme was $0.202m (2013: $0.171m).

(g) Gains

Gains from the disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

(h) Transactions with the Government as owner

Equity Injections

Amounts appropriated by Parliament which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year.

Other Distributions to Owners

The FMOs require that distributions to owners be debited to contributed equity unless it is in the nature of a dividend.

(i) Other transactions with Government

Some special purpose funding from Government is recognised as revenue only when the related expenditure is incurred.

This includes funds received from Government’s TV fund in 2000 and subsequent years for analogue extensions to regional areas, and for the Commonwealth’s Television Black Spots - Alternative Technical Solutions Program.

The amounts received, including interest accrued on these amounts, are recognised as revenue when related expenditure is incurred or when the program of work has been completed. Refer to Note 4(a) and 4(e).

(j) Employee benefi ts

Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefi ts’ (as defi ned in AASB 119 “Employee Benefi ts”) and termination benefi ts expected to be wholly settled within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

92 SBS Annual Report 2014

The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.

(i) Leave

The liability for employee benefi ts includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leaves is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees of the entity is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the entity’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave has been determined by reference to the work of an actuary as at 30 June 2012. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and infl ation.

(ii) Separation and Redundancy

Provision is made for separation and redundancy benefi t payments. The Corporation recognises a provision for termination when it can no longer withdraw the offer of those benefi ts, or it has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations and has informed those employees affected that it will carry out the terminations.

(iii) Superannuation

The Corporation’s staff are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap), or a complying superannuation fund of their choice (under the superannuation guarantee legislation). The Corporation also contributes superannuation in respect of contract staff engaged under Section 44 of the Special Broadcasting Service Act 1991, in accordance with the superannuation guarantee legislation. The contributions are included in the cost of contract.

The CSS and PSS are defi ned benefi t schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defi ned contribution scheme.

The liability for defi ned benefi ts is recognised in the fi nancial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes.

The entity makes employer contributions to the employees’ superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be suffi cient to meet the current cost to the Government. The entity accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defi ned contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions for the fi nal fortnight of the year.

(k) Leases

A distinction is made between fi nance leases and operating leases. Finance leases effectively transfer from the lessor to the lessee substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership of leased assets. An operating lease is a lease that is not a fi nance lease. In operating leases, the lessor effectively retains substantially all such risks and benefi ts.

Where an asset is acquired by means of a fi nance lease, the asset is capitalised at either the fair value of the lease property or, if lower, the present value of minimum lease payments at the inception of the contract. A liability is recognised at the same time and for the same amount.

The discount rate used is the interest rate implicit in the lease. Leased assets are amortised over the period of the lease. Lease payments are allocated between the principal component and the interest expense.

Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight-line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefi ts derived from the leased assets.

Provision for make good

A provision for make good exists when the Corporation has an obligation to “make good” leased properties at the end of the lease term. The provision is initially measured based on the estimated average cost to make good the site, and then subsequently revalued - see Note 1(v).

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(l) Borrowing costs

All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred.

(m) Foreign currency

Transactions denominated in a foreign currency are converted at the effective exchange rate on the date of the transaction. Exchange gains and losses are reported in profi t or loss.

(n) Fair value measurement

The Corporation measures the fair value of assets and liabilities in line with AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement.

(o) Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash on hand, at bank, or on short-term deposits with a maturity of 3 months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and are subject to insignifi cant risk of changes in value. It excludes amounts on long-term deposits that are not immediately required for operational expenditure. Cash and cash equivalents are recognised at their nominal amounts.

(p) Financial assets

In line with AASB 139 “Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement”, the Corporation classifi es its fi nancial assets in the following categories:

a) fi nancial assets at fair value through profi t or loss;

b) held-to-maturity investments;

c) available-for-sale fi nancial assets; and

d) loans and receivables.

The classifi cation depends on the nature and purpose of the fi nancial assets and is determined at the time of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised and derecognised upon trade date.

Effective Interest Method

The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a fi nancial asset and of allocating interest income over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the fi nancial asset, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis except for fi nancial assets that are recognised at fair value through profi t or loss.

Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Profi t or Loss

Financial assets are classifi ed as fi nancial assets at fair value through profi t or loss where the fi nancial assets: a) have been acquired principally for the purpose of selling in the near future; b) are derivatives that are not designated and effective as a hedging instrument; or c) are a part of an identifi ed portfolio of fi nancial instruments that

the Corporation manages together and has a recent actual pattern of short-term profi t-taking.

Available-for-Sale Financial Assets

Available-for-sale fi nancial assets are non-derivatives that are either designated in this category or not classifi ed in any of the other categories.

Held-to-Maturity Investments

Non-derivative fi nancial assets with fi xed or determinable payments and fi xed maturity dates that the Corporation has the positive intent and ability to hold to maturity are classifi ed as held-to-maturity investments. Held-to-maturity investments are recorded at amortised cost using the effective interest method (see above) less impairment, with revenue recognised on an effective yield basis.

The Corporation has a series of investments with banks and other fi nancial institutions for funds not immediately required for operational expenditure. They are held-to-maturity investments (term deposits) which are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method - see Note 18.

Loans and Receivables

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that have fi xed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market are classifi ed as ‘loans and receivables’. Loans and receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment. Interest is recognised by applying the effective interest rate.

Impairment of Financial Assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period.

Financial assets held at amortised cost - if there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred for loans and receivables or held-to-maturity investments held at amortised cost, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash fl ows discounted at the asset’s original effective interest rate. The carrying amount is reduced by way of an allowance account. The loss is recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

94 SBS Annual Report 2014

Available-for-sale fi nancial assets - if there is objective evidence that an impairment loss on an available-for-sale fi nancial asset has been incurred, the amount of the difference between its cost, less principal repayments and amortisation, and its current fair value, less any impairment loss previously recognised in expenses, is transferred from equity to the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

Financial assets carried at cost - if there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred, the amount of the impairment loss is the difference between the carrying amount of the asset and the present value of the estimated future cash fl ows discounted at the current market rate for similar assets.

(q) Investment in associates

The entity’s investment in its associates is accounted for using the equity method.

Under the equity method, investments in the associates are carried in the Corporation’s Statement of Financial Position at cost as adjusted for post-acquisition charges in the Corporation’s share of net assets of the associates. Goodwill relating to an associate is included in the carrying amount of the investment. After the application of the equity method, the Corporation determines whether it is necessary to recognise any impairment loss with respect to the net investment in associates.

Further details relating to its associate company, Freeview Australia Ltd, are provided in Note 7(c)(ii).

(r) Jointly controlled entities

Interests in jointly controlled entities in which the entity is a venturer (and so has joint control) are accounted for using the equity method.

Further details relating to the Corporation’s joint venture with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (National DAB Licence Company Ltd) are provided in Note 7(c)(i).

(s) Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities are classifi ed as either fi nancial liabilities ‘at fair value through profi t or loss’ or other fi nancial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Financial Liabilities at Fair Value Through Profi t or Loss

Financial liabilities at fair value through profi t or loss are initially measured at fair value. Subsequent fair value adjustments are recognised in profi t or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profi t or loss incorporates any interest paid on the fi nancial liability.

Other fi nancial liabilities

Other fi nancial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective yield basis.

The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a fi nancial liability and of allocating interest expense over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash payments through the expected life of the fi nancial liability, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

(t) Contingent Assets and Liabilities

Contingent assets and liabilities are not recognised in the Statement of Financial Position but are reported in the relevant schedule and Note 13: Contingent Assets and Liabilities. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of an liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured.

Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

(u) Acquisition of assets

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor’s accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

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(v) Property, plant and equipment

Asset recognition threshold

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the Statement of Financial Position, except for purchases costing less than $2,000 which are expensed in the year of acquisition except where they form part of a project or group of similar items, which are signifi cant in total.

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. This is particularly relevant to ‘make good’ provisions in property leases taken up by the Corporation where there exists an obligation to restore the property to its original condition. These costs are included in the value of the Corporation’s leasehold improvements with a corresponding provision for the ‘make good’ recognised at net present value. The increase in the net present value through the passage of time, or “unwinding of the discounted value”, is recognised as a fi nance cost - see Note 3(e)(i).

Revaluations

Following initial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment are carried at fair value less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations are conducted with suffi cient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depends upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/defi cit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/defi cit except to the extent that they reverse previous revaluation increments for that class.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is restated proportionately with the change in the gross carrying amount of the asset so that the carrying amount of the asset after revaluation equals its revalued amount.

“Make good” under revaluation model

Changes in “make good” provisions under the revaluation model are the reverse of revaluations of the related asset, the only difference being the account affected (asset or provision). A decrease in the provision for “make good” (similar to a revaluation increase of the related asset) is credited to asset revaluation reserve unless it reverses a previous increase which was recognised in profi t and loss.

Fair values for each class of asset are determined as shown below:

Asset Class Fair value measured at

Land Market selling price

Buildings excl. leasehold improvements Income approach

Leasehold improvements Depreciated replacement cost

Plant and equipment Market selling price or depreciated replacement cost

(w) Depreciation and amortisation

Property, plant and equipment, other than freehold land, is depreciated up to their estimated residual values, over their estimated useful lives to the Corporation using the straight line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or future reporting periods, as appropriate.

96 SBS Annual Report 2014

Depreciation and amortisation rates applied to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

2013-2014 2012-2013

Class of non-fi nancial asset Avg Avg

Buildings 40 years 40 40 years 40

Leasehold improvements Lease term 15 Lease term 15

Plant and equipment 3 to 20 years 7 3 to 20 years 7

Intangibles (excluding goodwill and trademark) 5 to 7 years 6 5 to 7 years 6

The aggregate amount of depreciation allocated for each class of asset during the reporting period is disclosed in Note 3(d).

Leasehold improvements are amortised on a straight line basis over the shorter of either the unexpired period of the lease or the estimated useful life of the improvements.

Intangible assets (software licences and contract rights) are amortised on a straight line basis over their estimated useful lives.

Goodwill and trademark are not amortised, but tested for impairment.

(x) Impairment of non-current assets

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2014. Where indications of impairment exist (e.g. goodwill), the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash fl ows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefi t of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash fl ows, and the asset would be replaced if the Corporation were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost. For the purposes of goodwill impairment testing, a “cash-generating unit” (CGU), comprising the smallest group of assets to which goodwill can be allocated, is identifi ed and tested for impairment as a group - see Note 8(d).

(y) Intangibles

The Corporation’s intangibles comprise of software licences acquired, goodwill, contract rights and trademark.

Goodwill

Goodwill is recognised on purchase of a business unit in accordance with AASB 3 “Business Combinations” - see Note 8(d). Goodwill is tested for impairment annually.

Contract rights and trademark

Contract rights are amortised over their anticipated useful lives (6 years). Trademark is not amortised as it has an indefi nite useful life, but is tested for impairment.

Software

Software comprises of purchased and internally developed software for internal use. Software is initially recognised at cost and amortised on a straight-line basis over anticipated useful lives. These assets are assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2014.

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(z) Program inventory

Program costs are capitalised as inventory and amortised over time to refl ect their expected usage:

Program acquisitions

Program acquisitions are amortised on a straight line basis over the shorter of three years or licence period (for movies), or over the shorter period of two years or licence period (for documentaries and other overseas purchased programs).

Commissioned programs

Commissioned programs are valued at cost, and amortised on a straight line basis over the shorter of four years or licence period.

Some programs are fully amortised in the current period. All internally produced news and current affairs programs, as well as sports events, are expensed immediately at the time of broadcast.

An annual review of all programs is undertaken at the end of the reporting period. Programs which are not expected to provide future benefi ts are written down.

(aa) Taxation

The Corporation is exempt from all forms of taxation except fringe benefi ts tax (FBT) and goods and services tax (GST).

Goods and Services Tax

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of goods and services tax (GST), except:

(i) where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the taxation authority, it is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of an asset or as part of an item of expense; or

(ii) for receivables and payables which are recognised inclusive of GST.

The net amount of GST receivable from the ATO is included as a fi nancial asset in the balance sheet while any net amount of GST payable to the ATO is included as a liability in the balance sheet.

In the cash fl ow statement, the GST components arising from investing and fi nancing activities which are recoverable from or payable to the ATO are classifi ed as operating cash fl ows.

2. Events after the reporting period

No known event has occurred after the reporting period which could have a signifi cant and adverse fi nancial impact on the Corporation.

98 SBS Annual Report 2014

3. Expenses

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

3(a) Employee benefi ts

Wages and salaries 96,535 85,747

Superannuation (Defi ned Contribution Plans) 13,802 12,495

Leave and other entitlements 12,568 11,040

Separations and redundancies 673 306

Total employee benefi ts 123,578 109,588

3(b) Suppliers

Goods

Materials and minor items 7,816 6,246

Offi ce supplies 1,583 1,302

Other program purchases 28,216 16,563

Sub-total goods 37,615 24,111

Services

Broadcasting 90,352 82,115

Administrative expenses 41,969 40,101

Analogue extensions 115 1,783

Contract staff 17,785 16,135

Production services 2,861 2,669

Audit fees 17 119 116

Sub-total services 153,201 142,919

Total goods and services 190,816 167,030

Goods supplied in connection with

Related parties 2 408

External parties 37,613 23,703

Total goods supplied 37,615 24,111

Services rendered in connection with

Related parties 1,888 1,840

External parties 151,313 141,079

Total services rendered 153,201 142,919

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 190,816 167,030

Other supplier expenses

Operating lease rentals, minimum lease payments 3,263 2,885

Workers’ compensation premiums 1,222 647

Total other supplier expenses 4,485 3,532

Total supplier expenses 195,301 170,562

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Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

3(c) Program inventory amortisation

Amortisation of program acquisitions 23,166 18,848

Amortisation of commissioned programs 24,101 25,036

Total program inventory amortisation 47,267 43,884

3(d) Depreciation and amortisation

Depreciation

Plant and equipment 8,521 7,794

Buildings 2,487 2,486

Total depreciation 11,008 10,280

Amortisation

Intangibles - contract rights 39 39

Intangibles - computer software 1,374 1,129

Total amortisation 1,413 1,168

Total depreciation and amortisation 12,421 11,448

3(e) Finance costs

Loans from Government 223 247

Finance lease 36 29

Unwinding of discount (i) 29 28

Total fi nance costs 288 304

(i) The “unwinding of discount” relates to the increase in provision for restoration costs (“make good” leasehold improvements at Federation Square, at the end of the lease term), as the discounted net present value increases, through the passage of time.

3(f) Write-down and impairment of assets

Asset write-downs and impairments from:

Impairment on fi nancial instruments (i) 56 25

Impairment of plant and equipment 472 35

Impairment on intangible assets 20 15

Total write-down and impairment of assets 548 75

(i) Impairment on fi nancial instruments relates to the write-off of receivables during the period.

3(g) Foreign exchange losses

Non-speculative - 35

Total foreign exchange losses - 35

100 SBS Annual Report 2014

4. Own-source income

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

4(a) Sale of goods and rendering of services

Sale of programs and merchandise 3,136 2,497

Rendering of services 99,133 74,650

Total sales of goods and services 102,269 77,147

Rendering of services

Advertising and sponsorship 73,394 58,033

Pay TV subscription revenue 10,953 11,619

Broadcasting 9(b)(iii) 10,694 -

Production services 4,092 4,998

Total rendering of services 99,133 74,650

Sale of goods in connection with

Related parties - 79

External parties 3,136 2,418

Total sales of goods 3,136 2,497

Rendering of services in connection with

Related parties 1,262 654

External parties 97,871 73,996

Total rendering of services 99,133 74,650

Total sales of goods and rendering of services 102,269 77,147

4(b) Interest

Deposits 3,472 4,331

Total interest 3,472 4,331

4(c) Rental Income

Operating Lease

Other 1,045 1,071

Total rental income 1,045 1,071

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Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

4(d) Royalties

Program rights 4,451 4,046

Total royalties 4,451 4,046

4(e) Other revenue

Revenue from Television Black Spots 115 1,783

Miscellaneous revenue 1,430 1,109

Total other revenue 1,545 2,892

Gains

4(f) Net gains from sale of assets

Plant and equipment

Proceeds from sale - (6)

Carrying value of assets sold - 5

Total gains from sale of assets - (1)

4(g) Foreign exchange gains

Non-speculative 46 -

Total foreign exchange gains 46 -

5. Revenue from Government

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Department of Communications

CAC Act body payment item 267,005 246,943

Total revenue from Government 267,005 246,943

Reconciliation of actual receipts from Government with reported revenue from Government in the statement of comprehensive income

Receipts from Government 269,772 248,554

Less: Unearned revenue from Government 9(b)(i) (2,767) (1,611)

Total revenue from Government 267,005 246,943

102 SBS Annual Report 2014

6. Fair value measurements

The following tables provide an analysis of assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value.

The different levels of the fair value hierarchy are defi ned below.

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at measurement date.

Level 2: Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

As at 30 June 2014, the Corporation’s held investments (held-to-maturity) and loans payable to the Commonwealth for which fair values have been calculated, and disclosed in this note (as Level 2 fi nancial instruments). The fair values of the held-to-maturity investments and the Commonwealth loans are calculated on the basis of discounted cash fl ows using current interest rates (at 30 June 2014) for investments and liabilities with similar market and credit risk profi les. The fair values of cash, receivables for goods and services, and trade creditors approximate their carrying amounts.

No change in fair value disclosed in this note has been, nor is required to be, recognised in profi t and loss. They are held-to-maturity, and are not held for sale. There are no unrecognised fi nancial assets or liabilities.

6(a) Fair value measurement

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period by hierarchy for assets and liabilities in 2013-14

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period using

Fair value $’000 Level 1 inputs $’000

Level 2 inputs $’000 Level 3 inputs $’000

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 12,048 12,048 - -

Receivables for goods and services (net) 28,306 - 28,306 -

Total fi nancial assets 40,354 12,048 28,306 -

Non-fi nancial assets

Land 32,590 - 6,590 26,000

Buildings on freehold land 38,500 - - 38,500

Leasehold improvements 2,605 - - 2,605

Other plant and equipment 30,989 - 7,499 23,490

Total non-fi nancial assets 104,684 - 14,089 90,595

Total fair value measurements of assets in the statement of fi nancial position 145,038 12,048 42,395 90,595

Assets not measured at fair value in the statement of fi nancial position

Investments 21,207 - 21,207 -

Total assets not measured at fair value in the statement of fi nancial position 21,207 - 21,207 -

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Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period using

Fair value $’000 Level 1 inputs $’000

Level 2 inputs $’000 Level 3 inputs $’000

Financial liabilities

Finance lease liabilities 554 - 554 -

Suppliers - Trade Creditors 21,856 - 21,856 -

Payable to Government 3,151 - 3,151 -

Other payables (salaries and superannuation) 6,452 - 6,452 -

Total fi nancial liabilities 32,013 - 32,013 -

Total fair value measurements of liabilities in the statement fi nancial position 32,013 - 32,013 -

Liabilities not measured at fair value in the statement of fi nancial position

Loans from Government 20,125 - 20,125 -

Total liabilities not measured at fair value in the statement of fi nancial position 20,125 - 20,125 -

The Corporation did not measure any non-fi nancial assets or liabilities at fair value on a non-recurring basis as at 30 June 2014.

Fair value measurements - highest and best use

The existing use of the Corporation’s land holding in Craigieburn as a transmission site is not considered to be equivalent to its highest and best use. However its fair value measurement has been assessed at the asset’s highest and best use for residential purposes.

The current use of all controlled assets is considered their highest and best use.

6(b) Level 1 and Level 2 transfers for recurring fair value measurements

Recurring fair value measurements transferred between Level 1 and Level 2 for assets and liabilities

Transferred from

Level 1 to Level 2 2014 $’000

Level 2 to Level 1 2014 $’000

Non-fi nancial assets

Land and buildings - -

Leasehold improvements - -

Property, plant and equipment - -

Total non-fi nancial assets - -

There have been no transfers between levels of the hierarchy during the year.

The Corporation’s policy for determining when transfers between levels are deemed to have occurred can be found in Note 1.

104 SBS Annual Report 2014

6(c) Valuation technique and inputs for Level 2 and Level 3 fair value measurements

Level 2 and 3 fair value measurements - valuation technique and the inputs used for assets and liabilities in 2013-14

Category (Level 2 or Level 3) Fair value

$’000 Valuation techniques1 Inputs used

Range (weighted average)2

Non-fi nancial assets

Land (Craigieburn) 2 6,590 Market Approach Price per hectare $1,000,000 - $1,200,000

($1,150,000)

Land (Sydney) 3 26,000 Market Approach Price per square metre $1,100 - $1,350

($1,300)

Buildings on freehold land

3 38,500 Income Approach Rental price per

square metre

$220 - $250 ($245)

Capitalisation rate 7.8% - 8.5% (8.05%)

Leasehold improvements

3 2,346 Depreciated

Replacement Cost (DRC) Replacement Cost New (price per square metre)

Consumed economic benefi t/Obsolescence of asset

10.1% - 10.0% (10.1%) per annum

Restoration costs (“make good”)

3 259 Net Present Value Current obligation costs

(price per square metre) $250 - $350 ($392)

Discount rate 3.75% - 4.24% (4.02%)

Indexation rates 2.2% - 3.7% (2.65%)

Other plant and equipment

2 7,499 Market Approach Adjusted market

transactions

Other plant and equipment

3 23,490 Depreciated Replacement Cost (DRC) Replacement Cost New

Consumed economic benefi t/Obsolescence of asset

20.0% - 3.6% (10.7%) per annum

Financial assets not measured at fair value in the statement of fi nancial position

Investments 2 21,207 Market Approach Interest rate 2.5% - 3.5%

Financial liabilities not measured at fair value in the statement of fi nancial position

Loans from Government

2 20,125 Market Approach Interest rate 2.66%

Notes:

1. There has been no changes to valuation techniques.

2. Signifi cant unobservable inputs only. Not applicable for assets or liabilities in the Level 2 category.

There were no signifi cant inter-relationships between unobservable inputs that materially affect fair value.

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6(c) Valuation technique and inputs for Level 2 and Level 3 fair value measurements (Continued)

Recurring and non-recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - valuation processes

The Corporation procured the service of the Australian Valuation Offi ce (AVO) to undertake a comprehensive valuation of all plant and equipment at 30 June 2012. The Corporation tests the procedures of the valuation model as an internal management review at least once every 12 months (with a formal revaluation undertaken once every three years). If a particular asset class experiences signifi cant and volatile changes in fair value (i.e. where indicators suggest that the value of the class has changed materially since the previous reporting period), that class is subject to specifi c valuation in the reporting period, where practicable, regardless of the timing of the last specifi c valuation. The Corporation has engaged Australian Valuation Solutions (AVS) to provide written assurance that the model developed is in compliance with AASB 13 “Fair Value Measurement”.

There is no change in the valuation technique since the prior year.

Signifi cant Level 2 and 3 inputs utilised by the entity are derived and evaluated as follows:

Land and Buildings

Land - Price per square metre/per hectare

The Artarmon and Craigieburn land assets have been measured using the market approach by reference to similar transactions within the surrounding locality. The adopted price per square metre has been determined based on professional judgement regarding the comparability of transactions to the subject asset. The existing use of the property at Artarmon is currently considered to be its highest and best use.

The land asset at Craigieburn is not currently used at its highest and best use. The Corporation has valued the land at its highest and best use (i.e. an en-globo residential subdivision) as at 30 June 2014. The asset is subject to an encumbrance (lease) until 2023, which is a restriction that would pass to a market participant. The fair value measurement has therefore considered this restriction by subtracting the present value of the lease rent and estimated relocation costs of the lessee as at the reporting date.

Buildings - Market Rental and Capitalisation Rate

The income capitalisation approach has been adopted to determine the fair value of the buildings asset class. Under the income capitalisation approach the net market rental is capitalised at an appropriate yield as determined from comparable sales transactions. The analysis and selection of an appropriate market rental and yield from evidence with varying degrees of comparability to the subject property is determined based on professional judgement.

Leasehold Improvements - Consumed economic benefi t/Obsolescence of asset

Assets that do not transact with enough frequency or transparency to develop objective opinions of value from observable market evidence have been measured utilising the cost (Depreciated Replacement Cost or DRC) approach. Under the DRC approach the estimated cost to replace the asset is calculated and then adjusted to take into account its consumed economic benefi t/asset obsolescence (accumulated depreciation). Consumed economic benefi t/asset obsolescence has been determined based on professional judgment regarding physical, economic and external obsolescence factors relevant to the asset under consideration.

The weighted average is determined by assessing the fair value measurement as a proportion of the total fair value for the class against the total useful life of each asset.

Property, Plant and Equipment - Consumed economic benefi t/Obsolescence of asset

Assets that do not transact with enough frequency or transparency to develop objective opinions of value from observable market evidence have been measured utilising the cost (Depreciated Replacement Cost or DRC) approach. Under the DRC approach the estimated cost to replace the asset is calculated and then adjusted to take into account its consumed economic benefi t/asset obsolescence (accumulated depreciation). Consumed economic benefi t/asset obsolescence has been determined based on professional judgment regarding physical, economic and external obsolescence factors relevant to the asset under consideration.

106 SBS Annual Report 2014

Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - sensitivity of inputs

Leasehold Improvements & Property, Plant and Equipment - Consumed economic benefi t/Obsolescence of asset

The signifi cant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement of the Corporation’s leasehold improvements and property, plant and equipment asset classes relate to the consumed economic benefi t/asset obsolescence. A signifi cant increase/(decrease) in this input would result in a signifi cantly lower/(higher) fair value measurement.

Land - Price per square metre/hectare

The signifi cant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement of the Corporation’s land asset class relate to the price per square metre/hectare. A signifi cant increase/(decrease) in this input would result in a signifi cantly higher/(lower) fair value measurement.

Buildings - Market Rental and Capitalisation Rate

The signifi cant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement of the Corporation’s building asset classes relate to the potential market rental and market capitalisation rate. A signifi cant increase/(decrease) in the market rental would result in a signifi cantly higher/(lower) fair value measurement. A signifi cant increase/(decrease) in the market capitalisation rate would result in a signifi cantly lower/(higher) fair value measurement.

6(d) Reconciliation for recurring Level 3 fair value measurements

Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - reconciliation for assets

Non-fi nancial assets

Notes

Land and Buildings 2014 $’000

Leasehold Improvements 2014 $’000

Property, Plant and Equipment 2014

$’000

Total 2014 $’000

Opening balance 1 60,286 3,161 21,987 85,434

Accumulated depreciation (1,663) (771) (3,419) (5,853)

Purchases 4,922 4,922

Sales - - - -

Total gains/(losses) in valuation 2 5,877 215 6,092

Issues - - - -

Settlements - - - -

Transfers into Level 3 3 - - - -

Transfers out of Level 3 3 - - - -

Closing balance 64,500 2,605 23,490 90,595

Changes in unrealised gains/(losses) recognised 4 - - - -

1. Opening balance as determined in accordance with AASB 13 “Fair Value Measurement”.

2. These gains/(losses) are presented in the Statement of Comprehensive Income under changes in asset revaluation surplus.

3. There have been no transfers between levels of hierarchy during the year.

4. There are no unrealised gains/(losses) presented in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

The Corporation’s policy for determining when transfers between levels are deemed to have occurred can be found in Note 1.

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7. Financial assets

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

7(a) Cash and cash equivalents

Cash on hand or on deposit 12,048 19,127

Total cash and cash equivalents 12,048 19,127

7(b) Trade and other receivables

Goods and services receivables in connection with

Related parties 363 231

External parties (i) 26,533 15,916

Total goods and services receivables 26,896 16,147

Department of Communications

Receivables 78 78

Other receivables

Net GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Offi ce 1,349 2,030

Interest 61 8

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 28,384 18,263

Less impairment allowance

Goods and services (78) (30)

Total trade and other receivables (net) 28,306 18,233

(i) The majority of goods and services receivables relate to advertising agencies and to pay TV subscription fees.

Trade and other receivables (net) expected to be recovered:

No more than 12 months 28,306 18,155

More than 12 months - 78

Total trade and other receivables (net) 28,306 18,233

Trade and other receivables (gross) aged as follows:

Not overdue 26,777 16,715

Overdue by:

0 to 30 days 538 730

30 to 60 days 835 129

61 to 90 days 8 82

more than 90 days 226 607

1,607 1,548

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 28,384 18,263

The impairment allowance aged as follows:

Overdue by:

more than 90 days 78 30

Total impairment allowance account 78 30

Total trade and other receivables (net) 28,306 18,233

108 SBS Annual Report 2014

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Credit terms were 45 days for advertising (2013: 45 days) and 30 days for goods and services (2013: 30 days).

Reconciliation of the impairment allowance

Movements in relation to the fi nancial period (goods and services)

Opening Balance 30 30

Amounts written off (8) -

Increase recognised in net cost of services 56 -

Closing Balance 78 30

7(c) Investments accounted for using the equity method

Investments in jointly controlled entities

National DAB Licence Company Ltd (i) - -

Freeview Australia (ii) - -

Investments accounted for using the equity method expected to be recovered

No more than 12 months - -

More than 12 months - -

Total investments accounted for using the equity method - -

Ownership

Name of entity Principal activity 2014 2013

National DAB Licence Company Ltd Manage digital radio transmitter licence 50.0% 50.0%

Freeview Australia Promote free-to-air digital television 17.6% 17.6%

(i) National DAB Licence Company Ltd

In 2009, the Corporation and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) formed a joint venture company with 50% interest each, “National DAB Licence Company Ltd” (National DAB) to purchase and manage the “category 3” Digital Radio multiplex transmitter licence for digital radio broadcasting.

The Corporation’s two nominated Directors (one of whom was Chairman in 2013 and 2014) receive no benefi t or remuneration from National DAB.

Contracts for digital radio transmission and distribution are entered into by the Corporation in its own name. These commitments are included in the schedule of commitments. At 30 June 2014 National DAB had not made, nor is expected to make, any material profi t/(loss). The owners make a contribution each year in proportion to their shareholdings. These costs do not constitute a contribution of capital and have been expensed in the Corporation’s Statement of Comprehensive Income. A summary of National DAB’s results as at 30 June 2014 is disclosed below.

(ii) Freeview Australia Ltd

The Corporation also contributes towards the operational costs of Freeview Australia Ltd (Freeview) in proportion to its shareholding. The Corporation holds 160 $1 shares in Freeview. As a result of a buy-back of shares by the company, the Corporation’s interest is 17.6% in 2014 (2013: 17.6%). No material income is expected from these contributions. These costs do not constitute a contribution of capital and have been expensed in the Corporation’s statement of comprehensive income.

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The Corporation’s two nominated Directors receive no benefi t or remuneration from Freeview. A summary of Freeview’s results as at 30 June is disclosed below:

Summarised fi nancial information of jointly controlled entities

National DAB 2014 $’000

Freeview 2014 $’000

National DAB 2013 $’000

Freeview 2013 $’000

Statement of Financial Position

Current assets 1 435 7 279

Non-current assets - - - 24

Current liabilities - 286 6 95

Non-current liabilities - 140 - 200

Statement of Comprehensive Income

Income 6 2,975 6 1,972

Expense (6) (2,974) (6) (1,972)

Net surplus - 1 - -

Share of jointly controlled entities’ net surplus

Share of net surplus before tax - - - -

Income tax expense - - - -

Share of jointly controlled entities’ net surplus after tax - - - -

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

7(d) Other Investments

Deposits 21,190 23,333

Total other investments 21,190 23,333

The Corporation has a series of investments with banks and other fi nancial institutions. The investments are made under s18 of the CAC Act.

The economic entity’s investments have Standard & Poor’s credit ratings of A+ or better, and are not deemed to be impaired.

Other investments expected to be recovered:

No more than 12 months 20,859 22,589

More than 12 months 331 744

Total other investments 21,190 23,333

110 SBS Annual Report 2014

8. Non-fi nancial assets

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

8(a) Land and buildings

Freehold land

Freehold land (at fair value) 8(c) 32,590 27,215

Total freehold land 32,590 27,215

Buildings on freehold land

Buildings (at fair value) 38,500 36,029

Accumulated depreciation - (1,714)

Total buildings on freehold land 38,500 34,315

Leasehold improvements

Leasehold improvements (at fair value) 10,608 10,386

Accumulated amortisation (8,003) (7,225)

Total leasehold improvements 2,605 3,161

Total land and buildings (non-current) 8(c) 73,695 64,691

No indicators of impairment were found for land and buildings. No land and buildings are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

8(b) Plant and equipment

Plant and equipment (at fair value) 8(c) 74,515 70,863

Accumulated depreciation (43,526) (38,787)

Total plant and equipment (non-current) 30,989 32,076

Revaluations of non-fi nancial assets

All non-current assets of the Corporation are at independent valuation except for intangible assets. In accordance with AASB 138 Intangible Assets, intangibles are carried at cost if no active market exists for the Corporation’s intangible assets.

In 2014, an independent revaluation of leasehold improvements at Federation Square and Parliament House resulted in an asset revaluation increment of $0.215m. The asset revaluation reserve was increased by $0.047m for the increase in the provision for “make good” - see note 1(v).

In 2014, the Corporation’s land and buildings were revalued by independent valuers resulting in an asset revaluation reserve increment of $11.467m.

The useful economic life of “Buildings on Freehold Land” was revised upwards from 40 years to 50 years as at 30 June 2014.

The revaluations have been implemented as follows:

- Leasehold improvements were revalued as at 30 June 2014;

- Freehold land was revalued as at 30 June 2014; and

- Buildings on freehold land were revalued as at 30 June 2014.

- Plant and equipment were revalued at 30 June 2012;

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The revaluations for land and buildings were completed by independent valuers at fair value:

- T. Noble, AAPI, Australian Valuation Solutions - Craigieburn, Victoria (land), Federation Square, VIC (leasehold improvements), Parliament House, ACT (leasehold improvements), and Artarmon, NSW (land and building).

The revaluation for plant and equipment was made at fair value by an independent valuer T. Noble, AAPI, Australian Valuation Offi ce.

An annual assessment is also made each year to ensure that the carrying amount of assets is not materially different from fair valuation as at balance date. There were no indicators of impairment for any property, plant and equipment in 2014.

8(c) Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant and equipment (2013-14)

Land $’000

Buildings $’000

Total Land and Buildings $’000

Plant and Equipment $’000

Total $’000

As at 1 July 2013 Gross book value 27,215 46,415 73,630 70,863 144,493

Accumulated depreciation and impairment - (8,939) (8,939) (38,787) (47,726)

Total as at 1 July 2013 27,215 37,476 64,691 32,076 96,767

Additions:

- purchase - 24 24 7,906 7,930

- f i nance lease - - - - -

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income (equity) 5,375 6,092 11,467 - 11,467

Revaluations recognised in net cost of services - - - - -

Depreciation - (2,487) (2,487) (8,521) (11,008)

Disposals:

- other - - - (472) (472)

Total as at 30 June 2014 32,590 41,105 73,695 30,989 104,684

Total as at 30 June 2014 represented by:

Gross book value 32,590 49,108 81,698 74,515 156,213

Accumulated depreciation and impairment - (8,003) (8,003) (43,526) (51,529)

Total as at 30 June 2014 32,590 41,105 73,695 30,989 104,684

112 SBS Annual Report 2014

8(c) Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant and equipment (2012-13)

Land $’000

Buildings $’000

Total Land and Buildings $’000

Plant and Equipment $’000

Total $’000

As at 1 July 2012 Gross book value 27,215 46,386 73,601 66,290 139,891

Accumulated depreciation and impairment - (6,453) (6,453) (32,120) (38,573)

Total as at 1 July 2012 27,215 39,933 67,148 34,170 101,318

Additions:

- purchase - 29 29 4,925 4,954

- f i nance lease - - - 815 815

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income (equity) - - - - -

Revaluations recognised in net cost of services - - - - -

Depreciation - (2,486) (2,486) (7,794) (10,280)

Disposals:

- other - - - (40) (40)

Total as at 30 June 2013 27,215 37,476 64,691 32,076 96,767

Total as at 30 June 2013 represented by:

Gross book value 27,215 46,415 73,630 70,863 144,493

Accumulated depreciation and impairment - (8,939) (8,939) (38,787) (47,726)

Total as at 30 June 2013 27,215 37,476 64,691 32,076 96,767

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8(d) Intangibles

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Goodwill (i) 11,497 11,497

Trademark (at fair value) (ii) 112 112

Contract rights

Contract rights (at fair value) (ii) 241 241

Accumulated amortisation (182) (143)

Total contract rights 59 98

Computer software (iii)

Purchased 13,207 11,489

Internally developed - in progress 198 845

Internally developed - in use 3,296 286

Accumulated amortisation (9,142) (7,899)

Total computer software 7,559 4,721

Total intangibles (non-current) 19,227 16,428

(i) In 2009, the Corporation recognised goodwill of $9.243m following the restructure of the media representation function of the Corporation (previously outsourced) and the resulting acquisition of a business. In line with AASB 3 “Business Combinations”, goodwill was recognised as the difference between the consideration paid and the fair value of identifi able net assets which was Nil.

In 2010, the economic entity recognised additional goodwill of $2.254m following the purchase by SBS Subscription TV Ltd of the remaining 60% issued capital of PAN TV (to become its sole shareholder). Both companies have now merged with the Corporation.

(ii) An independent valuer also valued the identifi able assets of PAN TV on its full acquisition as $0.353m ($0.112m for trademark, and $0.241m for contract rights for the World Movies channel). Trademark is not amortised as it has an indefi nite useful life, but is assessed annually for impairment.

Goodwill is also not amortised, but is assessed annually for impairment (based on its “value in use” calculated as the net present value of estimated future net cash infl ows of the cash-generating unit (CGU) to which it has been allocated). In 2014, the amount of goodwill recognised was reviewed, using estimated cash infl ows assuming a risk adjusted pre-tax discount rate of 11% (2013: 11%), and growth rate of 1% in perpetuity (2013: 1%). On that basis, goodwill was assessed as not impaired.

(iii) There were no indicators of impairment for all other intangible assets (computer software) in 2014.

(iv) No intangible assets are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

114 SBS Annual Report 2014

8(e) Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of intangibles (2013-14)

Goodwill $’000 Trademark $’000

Contract Rights $’000

Computer Software Purchased $’000

Computer Software Internally Developed

$’000

Total $’000

As at 1 July 2013

Gross book value 11,497 112 241 11,489 1,131 24,470

Accumulated amortisation - - (143) (7,873) (26) (8,042)

Total as at 1 July 2013 11,497 112 98 3,616 1,105 16,428

Additions:

- purchase or internally developed - - - 1,869 2,363 4,232

Revaluations recognised in other comprehensive income (equity) - - - - - -

Reclassifi cation of assets - - - - - -

Amortisation - - (39) (1,057) (317) (1,413)

Disposals:

- other - - - (20) - (20)

Total as at 30 June 2014 11,497 112 59 4,408 3,151 19,227

Total as at 30 June 2014 represented by:

Gross book value 11,497 112 241 13,207 3,494 28,551

Accumulated amortisation and impairment - - (182) (8,799) (343) (9,324)

Total as at 30 June 2014 11,497 112 59 4,408 3,151 19,227

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8(e) Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of intangibles (2012-13)

Goodwill $’000 Trademark $’000

Contract Rights $’000

Computer Software Purchased $’000

Computer Software Internally Developed

$’000

Total $’000

As at 1 July 2012

Gross book value 11,497 112 241 10,428 35 22,313

Accumulated amortisation - - (104) (6,789) (2) (6,895)

Total as at 1 July 2012 11,497 112 137 3,639 33 15,418

Additions:

- purchase or internally developed - - - 1,097 1,096 2,193

Revaluations recognised in other comprehensive income (equity) - - - - - -

Reclassifi cation of assets - - - - - -

Amortisation - - (39) (1,105) (24) (1,168)

Disposals:

- other - - - (15) - (15)

Total as at 30 June 2013 11,497 112 98 3,616 1,105 16,428

Total as at 30 June 2013 represented by:

Gross book value 11,497 112 241 11,489 1,131 24,470

Accumulated amortisation and impairment - - (143) (7,873) (26) (8,042)

Total as at 30 June 2013 11,497 112 98 3,616 1,105 16,428

116 SBS Annual Report 2014

8(f) Inventories

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

All inventories are current assets

Inventories held for distribution

Purchased program rights - at cost 59,332 48,811

Accumulated amortisation (36,706) (28,284)

22,626 20,527

Commissioned programs (completed) - at cost 76,595 87,933

Accumulated amortisation (44,561) (61,520)

32,034 26,413

Commissioned programs - in progress 20,700 16,995

Total inventories (i) 75,360 63,935

(i) All programs are amortised and expensed in accordance with the policy outlined in Note 1(z). A review of programs and amortisation is undertaken annually, which resulted in an additional amount of $6.205m to be written down in 2014 (2013: $7.236m).

8(g) Other non-fi nancial assets

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Prepayments 20,495 18,978

Total other non-fi nancial assets 20,495 18,978

Other non-fi nancial assets expected to be recovered:

No more than 12 months 17,237 15,856

More than 12 months 3,258 3,122

Total other non-fi nancial assets 20,495 18,978

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9. Payables

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

9(a) Suppliers

Trade creditors and accruals 21,856 22,080

Total suppliers 21,856 22,080

Suppliers expected to be settled:

No more than 12 months 21,856 22,080

More than 12 months - -

Total suppliers 21,856 22,080

Suppliers in connection with:

Related parties 22 9

External parties 21,834 22,071

Total suppliers 21,856 22,080

Settlement was usually made within 30 days.

9(b) Other payables

Salaries 6,182 3,798

Superannuation 270 554

Separations and redundancies - -

Prepayments received 3,672 1,389

STV Production fund advance 900 395

Unearned revenue from Government (i) 2,767 1,611

Payable to Government (ii) 3,151 -

Other deferred revenue (iii) 105 13,831

Total other payables 17,047 21,578

(i) The unspent portion of revenue from Government received in 2014 to fund the Corporation’s conversion to digital transmission is $2.767m (2013: $1.611m). In line with Government policy (to fund only the amounts required for the conversion to digital) the unused funds have been recorded as a payable to Government.

(ii) The Corporation received funds from Government for providing broadcasting. An amount is payable to the Government for program work which has come to an end.

(iii) Funds received from Government for providing broadcasting, including the Commonwealth’s Television Black Spots - Alternative Technical Solutions Program are recognised as revenue when related expenditure is incurred or when the program of work is completed.

Analogue services ceased in December 2013; the unused funds to provide this service has been recognised as revenue.

Other payables expected to be settled:

No more than 12 months 16,971 20,835

More than 12 months 76 743

Total other payables 17,047 21,578

118 SBS Annual Report 2014

10. Interest bearing liabilities

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

10(a) Loans

Loan from Government (i) 20,105 3,011

Total loans 20,105 3,011

(i) In 2014 the Corporation received a short term loan of $20m to offset the cash fl ow impact of advance payments required to support the coverage of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. This is to be fully repaid by 31 July 2014. The interest rate on this loan is fi xed at 3.9%.

In 2009 the Corporation received a loan of $15m to meet prepayments of licences (as required by the contracts) for the broadcast of some major sports events and to upgrade its premises at Artarmon. This was fully repaid in 2014.

Loans expected to be settled:

Within 1 year 20,105 3,011

Between 1 to 5 years - -

Total loans 20,105 3,011

10(b) Leases

Finance lease (i) 554 707

Total leases 554 707

Leases expected to be settled:

Within 1 year:

Minimum lease payments 184 187

Future fi nance charges (27) (36)

Between 1 to 5 years

Minimum lease payments 421 606

Future fi nance charges (24) (50)

Total leases 554 707

(i) The Corporation entered into a fi nance lease agreement in 2013 for equipment to upgrade its storage area network. The non-cancellable lease is for a fi xed term of fi ve years. The interest rate implicit in the lease is 5.90%, with the residual value guaranteed at $1 at the end of the lease term. No fi nance lease was entered into in 2014.

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11. Provisions

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

11(a) Employee provisions

Leave 21,503 20,192

Separations and redundancies 584 882

Total employee provisions 22,087 21,074

Employee provisions expected to be settled:

No more than 12 months 13,012 12,240

More than 12 months 9,075 8,834

Total employee provisions 22,087 21,074

11(b) Other provisions

Provision for “make good” (i) 1,120 1,138

Total other provisions 1,120 1,138

Other provisions expected to be settled:

No more than 12 months - -

More than 12 months 1,120 1,138

Total other provisions 1,120 1,138

Movement in other provision

As at 1 July 2013 1,138 1,110

Adjustment to provisions on revaluation of leasehold improvements (47) -

Unwinding of discount or change in discount rate 29 28

Total as at 30 June 2014 1,120 1,138

(i) The Corporation, under its lease agreement at Federation Square, has an obligation to restore (“make good”) leasehold improvements at the end of the lease term. The provision is assessed as the present value of estimated restoration costs upon expiry of the lease in 2017.

120 SBS Annual Report 2014

12. Cash fl ow reconciliation

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents as per statement of fi nancial position to cash fl ow statement

Cash and cash equivalents as per:

Cash fl ow statement 12,048 19,127

Statement of fi nancial position 12,048 19,127

Discrepancy - -

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash from operating activities

Net (cost of) services (266,575) (246,408)

Revenue from Government 267,005 246,943

Operating result 430 535

Adjustments for non-cash items

Depreciation and amortisation of property, plant and equipment 12,421 11,448

Net write-down of non-fi nancial assets 492 49

Loss/(gain) on disposal of property, plant and equipment - (1)

Increase/(decrease) in allowance for doubtful debts 48 -

Increase/(decrease) in interest payable (capitalised against loan) 95 (10)

Decrease/(increase) in “make good” provisions on revaluation (against equity) 47 -

Increase in deferred interest 312 730

(Increase) in revenue from broadcasting (10,808) (1,783)

Changes in assets and liabilities:

Assets

Decrease/(increase) in net receivables (10,121) (1,414)

Decrease/(increase) in inventories (11,425) (6,192)

Decrease/(increase) in prepayments (1,516) (475)

Liabilities

Increase/(decrease) in other prepayments received 2,788 74

Increase/(decrease) in employee provisions 1,014 (1,510)

Increase/(decrease) in suppliers payables (225) 5,266

Increase/(decrease) in other payables 2,100 1,592

Increase/(decrease) in other provisions (18) 28

Increase/(decrease) in tax liability - 79

Increase/(decrease) in deferred tax liability - (339)

Increase/(decrease) in provision for return of appropriation 1,155 1,072

Net cash from (used by) operating activities (13,211) 9,149

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13. Contingent Assets and Liabilities

Guarantees Indemnities

Claims for damages or costs Total

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Contingent assets

Balance from previous period - - - - - - - -

New contingent assets recognised - - - - - - - -

Re-measurement - - - - - - - -

Assets realised - - - - - - - -

Rights expired - - - - - - - -

Total contingent assets - - - - - - - -

Contingent liabilities

Balance from previous period - - - - 2 83 2 83

New contingent liabilities recognised - - - - - 2 - 2

Re-measurement - - - - - - - -

Liabilities realised - - - - - - - -

Obligations expired - - - - (2) (83) (2) (83)

Total contingent liabilities - - - - - 2 - 2

Net contingent liabilities - - - - - 2 - 2

Quantifi able contingencies

The Corporation’s quantifi able net contingent liabilities were Nil as at 30 June 2014 (2013: $0.002m).

Unquantifi able contingencies

The Corporation has no unquantifi able contingencies as at 30 June 2014 (2013: Nil).

Signifi cant remote contingencies

The Corporation has no signifi cant remote contingencies as at 30 June 2014 (2013: Nil).

122 SBS Annual Report 2014

14. Directors remuneration

Non-executive directors remuneration

Directors

2014

Number

2013

Number

$0 - $29,999 2 6

$30,000 - $59,999 5 1

$60,000 - $89,999 1 1

Total number of non-executive directors 8 8

The total remuneration received or due and receivable by non-executive directors of the Corporation for 2014 is $280,085 (2013: $267,193).

Remuneration of executive directors is included is Note 16: Senior Executive Remuneration.

15. Related party disclosures

Transactions with associate companies, joint ventures, and other Commonwealth owned agencies and authorities

Joint venture companies are disclosed in Note 7(c)(ii). Other related party transactions with Commonwealth owned agencies are disclosed in the relevant notes. Unless otherwise stated, transactions between related parties are on normal commercial terms and conditions, which are no more favourable than those available to other parties.

Other transactions with directors or director-related entities

During the year the Corporation has entered into an agreement with a director-related entity, Racing Pulse Productions Pty Ltd, for the production of a specifi c program. The entity is related to Mr Joseph Skrzynski. The services were provided at arm’s length for $10,000.

There were no other transactions with director or director-related entities, except for the remuneration of Directors as disclosed in note 14.

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16. Senior executive remuneration

16(a) Senior executive remuneration expenses for the reporting period

“Senior executives” are persons engaged by the Corporation who are concerned in, or take part in, the management of the Corporation.

2014 $

2013 $

Short-term employee benefi ts:

Salary $2,708,004 $2,238,008

Performance bonus $520,081 $421,301

Other short-term allowances $74,852 $49,741

Total short-term employee benefi ts $3,302,937 $2,709,050

Post-employment benefi ts

Superannuation $242,170 $292,376

Total post-employment benefi ts $242,170 $292,376

Other long-term employee benefi ts

Annual leave accrued $190,759 $179,413

Long service leave $106,347 $26,419

Total other long-term employee benefi ts $297,106 $205,832

Termination benefi ts - -

Total senior executive remuneration expenses $3,842,213 $3,207,258

Notes:

1. Note 16(a) is prepared on an accrual basis, (therefore the performance bonus expenses disclosed above may differ from the cash ‘Bonus paid’ in Note 16(b)). In some instances performance bonuses may relate to more than one fi nancial year, as the senior executive’s performance bonus was determined in the same year.

2. Note 16(a) excludes acting arrangements and part-year service where total remuneration expensed for a senior executive was less than $195,000.

3. The increase in remuneration in 2014 is attributable to the settlement of accrued entitlements.

124 SBS Annual Report 2014

16(b) Average annual reportable remuneration paid to “substantive” senior executives during the reporting period

2013-14

Average annual reportable remuneration1

Substantive senior executives Number

Reportable salary2 $

Contributed superannuation3 $

Reportable allowances4 $

Bonus paid5 $

Total

reportable remuneration $

Total reportable remuneration (including part-time arrangements)

$195,000 - $224,999 1 205,454 18,556 901 - 224,911

$225,000 - $254,999 - - - - - -

$255,000 - $284,999 1 198,245 2,124 364 68,427 269,160

$285,000 - $314,999 2 252,774 22,220 - 29,689 304,683

$315,000 - $344,999 - - - - - -

$345,000 - $374,999 2 289,009 24,006 192 54,484 367,691

$375,000 - $404,999 1 301,831 23,962 1,151 53,793 380,737

$405,000 - $434,999 2 324,898 24,863 888 71,047 421,696

$525,000 - $554,999 - - - - - -

$555,000 - $584,999 1 454,258 23,974 1,256 92,654 572,142

Total number of substantive senior executives 10

2012-13

Average annual reportable remuneration1

Substantive senior executives Number

Reportable salary2 $

Contributed superannuation3 $

Reportable allowances4 $

Bonus paid5 $

Total

reportable remuneration $

Total reportable remuneration (including part-time arrangements)

$195,000 - $224,999 - - - - - -

$225,000 - $254,999 1 222,321 19,756 325 - 242,402

$255,000 - $284,999 1 219,456 19,737 - 19,541 258,734

$285,000 - $314,999 1 278,059 25,000 - - 303,059

$315,000 - $344,999 1 314,047 27,884 - - 341,931

$345,000 - $374,999 - - - - - -

$375,000 - $404,999 1 273,627 49,298 - 59,765 382,690

$405,000 - $434,999 2 321,600 38,374 220 66,124 426,318

$525,000 - $554,999 1 436,918 24,999 - 89,953 551,870

$555,000 - $584,999 - - - - - -

Total number of substantive senior executives 8

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Notes:

1. This table reports substantive senior executives who received remuneration during the reporting period, and is reported on a cash basis. Each row is an averaged fi gure based on headcount for individuals in the band.

2. ‘Reportable salary’ includes the following: a) gross payments (less any bonuses paid, which are separated out and disclosed in the ‘bonus paid’ column); b) reportable fringe benefi ts (at the net amount prior to ‘grossing up’ to account for tax purposes); c) reportable employer superannuation contributions; d) exempt foreign employment income.

3. The ‘contributed superannuation’ amount is the average cost to the entity for the provision of superannuation benefi ts to substantive senior executives in that reportable remuneration band during the reporting period.

4. ‘Reportable allowances’ are the average actual allowances paid as per the ‘total allowances’ line on individuals’ payment summaries.

5. ‘Bonus paid’ represents average actual bonuses paid during the reporting period in that reportable remuneration band. The ‘bonus paid’ within a particular band may vary between fi nancial years due to various factors such as individuals commencing with or leaving the entity during the fi nancial year, or the timing of the determination of the amount.

6. The increase in remuneration in 2014 is attributable to the settlement of accrued entitlements.

16(c) Average annual reportable remuneration paid to other highly paid staff during the reporting period

2013-14

Average annual reportable remuneration1

Other highly paid staff Number

Reportable salary2 $

Contributed superannuation3 $

Reportable allowances4 $

Bonus paid5 $

Total

reportable remuneration $

Total reportable remuneration (including part-time arrangements)

$195,000 - $224,999 16 176,371 22,401 - 10,382 209,154

$225,000 - $254,999 10 196,706 22,181 43 18,644 237,574

$255,000 - $284,999 1 205,326 16,811 - 43,147 265,284

$285,000 - $314,999 3 246,184 25,671 - 18,517 290,372

$315,000 - $344,999 4 258,007 35,789 2,085 31,003 326,884

$345,000 - $374,999 1 253,995 22,586 252 81,750 358,583

$375,000 - $404,999 - - - - - -

$405,000 - $434,999 2 331,564 39,615 - 48,750 419,929

Total number of other highly paid staff 37

126 SBS Annual Report 2014

2012-13

Average annual reportable remuneration1

Other highly paid staff Number

Reportable salary2 $

Contributed superannuation3 $

Reportable allowances4 $

Bonus paid5 $

Total

reportable remuneration $

Total reportable remuneration (including part-time arrangements)

$195,000 - $224,999 16 177,827 22,795 19 8,901 209,542

$225,000 - $254,999 10 207,156 21,874 256 9,781 239,067

$255,000 - $284,999 2 218,020 36,011 - 11,700 265,731

$285,000 - $314,999 2 254,410 18,294 - 24,875 297,579

$315,000 - $344,999 3 296,333 32,976 - 6,230 335,539

$345,000 - $374,999 - - - - - -

$375,000 - $404,999 1 338,914 55,760 - - 394,674

$405,000 - $434,999 - - - - - -

Total number of other highly paid staff 34

Notes:

1. This table reports staff: a) who were employed by the entity during the reporting period, and is reported on a cash basis; b) whose reportable remuneration was $195,000 or more for the fi nancial period; and c) were not required to be disclosed in Tables 16(b) or director disclosures. Each row is an averaged fi gure based on headcount for individuals in the band.

2. ‘Reportable salary’ includes the following: a) gross payments (less any bonuses paid, which are separated out and disclosed in the ‘bonus paid’ column); b) reportable fringe benefi ts (at the net amount prior to ‘grossing up’ to account for tax purposes); c) reportable employer superannuation contributions; d) exempt foreign employment income.

3. The ‘contributed superannuation’ amount is the average cost to the entity for the provision of superannuation benefi ts to other highly paid staff in that reportable remuneration band during the reporting period.

4. ‘Reportable allowances’ are the average actual allowances paid as per the ‘total allowances’ line on individuals’ payment summaries.

5. ‘Bonus paid’ represents average actual bonuses paid during the reporting period in that reportable remuneration band. The ‘bonus paid’ within a particular band may vary between fi nancial years due to various factors such as individuals commencing with or leaving the entity during the fi nancial year, or the timing of the determination of the amount.

6. Other highly paid staff includes remuneration paid to talent.

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17. Remuneration of auditors

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Fair value of the services received

Financial statement audit services 119 116

Other services 30 -

Total fair value of the services received 149 116

KPMG has been contracted by the Auditor-General (Australian National Audit Offi ce) to provide audit services to the Corporation on their behalf. In 2014 KPMG received fees of $0.030m (2013: Nil) from the Corporation for accounting advice.

18. Financial instruments

18(a) Categories of fi nancial instruments

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Financial assets

Held-to-maturity investments

Term Deposits 7(d) 21,190 23,333

Loans and receivables

Cash and cash equivalents 7(a) 12,048 19,127

Trade and other receivables 7(b) 28,306 18,233

40,354 37,360

Total fi nancial assets 61,544 60,693

Financial liabilities

At amortised cost

Loans from Government 10(a) 20,105 3,011

Finance lease 10(b) 554 707

Suppliers - trade creditors 9(a) 21,856 22,080

Payable to Government 9(b) 3,151 -

Other payables (salaries and superannuation) 9(b) 6,452 4,352

Total fi nancial liabilities 52,118 30,150

128 SBS Annual Report 2014

Notes

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

18(b) Net gains or losses on fi nancial assets

Held-to-maturity investments

Interest revenue 4(b) 3,472 4,331

Net gain/(loss) on held-to-maturity investments 3,472 4,331

Receivables

Exchange gains/(losses) 32 27

Net gains/(losses) on receivables 32 27

Net gains/(losses) on fi nancial assets (not at fair value through profi t and loss) (i) 3,504 4,358

(i) There were no other gains or losses arising from fi nancial assets other than interest revenue and exchange rate gains or losses.

18(c) Net gains or losses on fi nancial liabilities

Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost

Interest expense 3(e) (288) (304)

Exchange gains/(losses) 14 (62)

Net gains/(losses) on fi nancial liabilities measured at amortised cost (274) (366)

Net gain/(loss) on fi nancial liabilities (not at fair value through profi t and loss) (i) (274) (366)

(i) There were no other gains or losses arising from fi nancial liabilities other than interest paid and exchange rate gains or losses.

18(d) Fair values of fi nancial instruments

Notes

Carrying Amount 2014 $’000

Fair Value 2014 $’000

Carrying Amount 2013 $’000

Fair Value 2013 $’000

Financial assets (ii)

Cash and cash equivalents 7(a) 12,048 12,048 19,127 19,127

Receivables for goods and services (net) 7(b) 28,306 28,306 18,233 18,233

Investments 7(d) 21,190 21,207 23,333 23,363

Total fi nancial assets 61,544 61,561 60,693 60,723

Financial liabilities

Loans from Government 10(a) 20,105 20,125 3,011 3,059

Finance lease liabilities 10(b) 554 554 707 707

Suppliers - Trade Creditors 9(a) 21,856 21,856 22,080 22,080

Payable to Government 9(b) 3,151 3,151 - -

Other payables (salaries and superannuation) 9(b) 6,452 6,452 4,352 4,352

Total fi nancial liabilities 52,118 52,138 30,150 30,198

(ii) The Corporation has no fi nancial assets at fair value through profi t and loss as at 30 June 2014 (2013: Nil).

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18(e) Credit risk

The Corporation’s maximum exposures to credit risk at reporting date are the carrying amount of receivables for goods and services and its investments (term deposits) with various banks, as reported in the balance sheet.

Credit terms for receivables for goods and services are net 45 days for television advertising debtors and 30 days for other debtors. The Corporation has adopted a policy of rating the creditworthiness of entities before transacting with them, using information supplied by independent rating agencies where available or appropriate.

Trade receivables for the Corporation consist mainly of accredited advertising agencies and clients spread across diverse industries and geographical areas.

Maximum exposure to credit risk (excluding any collateral or credit enhancements)

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Financial assets carried at amount not best representing maximum exposure to credit risk

Receivables for goods and services (net) 28,306 18,233

Investments 21,190 23,333

Total fi nancial assets carried at amount not best representing maximum exposure to credit risk 49,496 41,566

Credit quality of fi nancial assets not past due or individually determined as impaired Notes

Not past due nor impaired 2014

$’000

Not past due nor impaired 2013

$’000

Past due or impaired 2014

$’000

Past due or impaired 2013

$’000

Receivables for goods and services (net) 7(b) 26,777 16,715 1,529 1,518

Investments 7(d) 21,190 23,333 - -

Total 47,967 40,048 1,529 1,518

Ageing of fi nancial assets that were past due but not impaired for 2014

0 to 30 days $’000

31 to 60 days $’000

61 to 90 days $’000

90+ days $’000

Total $’000

Receivables for goods and services (net) 538 835 8 148 1,529

Total 538 835 8 148 1,529

Ageing of fi nancial assets that were past due but not impaired for 2013

0 to 30 days $’000

31 to 60 days $’000

61 to 90 days $’000

90+ days $’000

Total $’000

Receivables for goods and services (net) 730 129 82 577 1,518

Total 730 129 82 577 1,518

An impairment allowance for doubtful debts is made for receivables assessed individually as impaired.

130 SBS Annual Report 2014

18(f) Liquidity risk

Liquidity risk is the risk that the Corporation will encounter diffi culty in meeting obligations associated with fi nancial liabilities.

The Corporation is an appropriated entity, which also relies on the sale of goods and services (mainly advertising and Pay TV subscription fees) to fund its operations.

The Corporation had an unsecured loan from Government in 2014. This was for a loan of $20.000m received in 2014 to offset the cash fl ow impact of advance payments required to support the coverage of the 2014 FIFA World Cup.

To manage its liquidity risk, the Corporation continuously monitors actual cash fl ows against forecast, reviewing and matching the maturity profi les of fi nancial assets and liabilities, and reforecasting revenues from independent sources (mainly advertising and Pay TV subscription fees).

The following consolidated table for the Corporation illustrates the Corporation’s exposure to credit risk.

Maturities for non-derivative fi nancial liabilities 2014 Notes

On

demand $’000

Within 1 year $’000

1 to 2 years $’000

2 to 5 years $’000

More than 5 years $’000

Total $’000

Loans from Government 10(a), (i) - 20,105 - - - 20,105

Finance lease liabilities 10(b) - 157 170 227 - 554

Suppliers (trade creditors) 9(a) - 21,856 - - - 21,856

Payable to Government 9(b) - 3,151 - - - 3,151

Other payables (salaries and super) 9(b) - 6,452 - - - 6,452

Total - 51,721 170 227 - 52,118

Maturities for non-derivative fi nancial liabilities 2013 Notes

On

demand $’000

Within 1 year $’000

1 to 2 years $’000

2 to 5 years $’000

More than 5 years $’000

Total $’000

Loans from Government 10(a),(ii) - 3,011 - - - 3,011

Finance lease liabilities 10(b) - 151 160 396 - 707

Suppliers (trade creditors) 9(a) - 22,080 - - - 22,080

Payable to Government 9(b) - - - - - -

Other payables (salaries and super) 9(b) - 4,352 - - - 4,352

Total - 29,594 160 396 - 30,150

(i) In 2014 the Corporation received a short term loan of $20.000m to offset the cash fl ow impact of advance payments required to support the coverage of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. This is to be fully repaid by 31 July 2014. The interest on this two month loan is 3.9% pa.

(ii) In 2009 the Corporation received a loan of $15.000m to meet prepayments of licences (as required by the contracts) for the broadcast of some major events and to upgrade its premises at Artarmon. This was fully repaid in 2014.

131

N Note e t s to to o tthe h F F Fin nan n a c ci c all S Sta ate e eme e m m ntt n s s s (co on nti tinued e e ))

18(g) Market risk

Market risks of the Corporation comprise mainly of interest and foreign currency risk.

Foreign currency risk

Foreign currency risk refers to the risk that the fair value or future cash fl ows of a fi nancial instrument will fl uctuate because of changes in foreign exchange rates. The Corporation is exposed to foreign currency risk through undertaking certain transactions denominated in foreign currency and is limited to some major sports events where contracts are entered into in foreign currencies. The majority of contracts, however, including overseas program purchases, are entered into in Australian dollars. Under current Government regulations, the Corporation cannot enter into any specifi c foreign exchange hedge contracts.

Interest rate risk

Interest rate risk refers to the risk that the fair value or future cash fl ows of a fi nancial instrument will fl uctuate because of changes in market interest rates. The Corporation is exposed to interest rate risk from its investments in term deposits. The Corporation’s investments have Standard & Poor’s credit ratings of A+ or better.

Interest rate risks are managed by maintaining an appropriate mix between fi xed and fl oating rates, with various banks, for the Corporation’s investments. The loan of $20.000m from Government is fi xed at 3.90% (see Note 18(f)).

Interest rate and foreign currency sensitivity analysis is provided in the following table:

Sensitivity analysis of the risk that the entity is exposed to for 2013-14 Notes Risk variable

Change in risk variable %

Effect on net cost of services $’000

Effect on Equity $’000

Currency risk (mainly in Swiss CHF, American USD and European EUR) (i)

Increase Exposed Currency +11.5% 10,541 -

Decrease Exposed Currency -11.5% (10,541) -

Interest rate risk - operational investments

Increase Interest +0.6% 49 -

Decrease Interest -0.6% (49) -

Sensitivity Analysis of the risk that the entity is exposed to for 2012-13 Notes Risk variable

Change in risk variable %

Effect on net cost of services $’000

Effect on Equity $’000

Currency risk (mainly in Swiss CHF and American USD) (i)

Increase Exposed Currency +15.7% 10,807 -

Decrease Exposed Currency -15.7% (10,807) -

Interest rate risk - operational investments

Increase Interest +1.20% 496 -

Decrease Interest -1.20% (496) -

(i) Foreign currency gains and losses are recognised in profi t or loss at the time the transaction is paid.

132 SBS Annual Report 2014

19. Financial assets reconciliation

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Total fi nancial assets as per statement of fi nancial position 61,544 60,693

Less non-fi nancial instrument components - -

Total fi nancial assets as per fi nancial instrument note 18(d) 61,544 60,693

20. Reporting of outcomes

The Corporation is structured to meet one outcome: Provide multilingual, multicultural and Indigenous radio, television and digital media services that inform, educate and entertain all Australians and, in doing so, refl ect Australia’s diverse society.

Net cost of outcome delivery

Outcome 1

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

Expenses 379,403 335,896

Other own-source income 112,828 89,488

Net cost/(contribution) of outcome delivery 266,575 246,408

133

Appendix 1 Multilingual Programming

Appendix 2 SBS Television: Programming broadcast hours by genre, run and source

Appendix 3 SBS Television: Languages broadcast

Appendix 4 SBS Television: Cultures broadcast

Appendix 5 SBS Television: SBS commissioned programs fi rst run

Appendix 6 SBS Television: Programs commissioned

Appendix 7 SBS Radio: Language programs broadcast

Appendix 8 SBS Radio: Schedules

Appendix 9 WorldWatch: Languages broadcast and source broadcasters

Appendix 10 SBS Television: Languages and dialects subtitled

Appendix 11 SBS Television: Audience share, reach and demographics

Appendix 12 SBS Digital Television: Areas served

Appendix 13 SBS Analogue Radio: Areas served

Appendix 14 SBS Digital Radio: Areas served

Appendix 15 SBS Television: Advertisers

Appendix 16 SBS Television: Program sponsors

Appendix 17 SBS Online: Advertisers

Appendix 18 SBS Radio: Advertisers

Appendix 19 SBS Sponsorships

Appendix 20 SBS Radio: Outside broadcasts

134 SBS Annual Report 2013-14

A App pe pend d dix ix 1 1 Mu Multtil iling gu ual al Pr ro rogr ram m mmi min ng

Summary

SBS Television1 SBS Radio2

SBS ONE SBS 2 NITV

Languages3 50 41 31 74

LOTE (Hrs)4 3638

(45%)

5116 (65%)

425 (5%)

247 (95%)

English (Hrs) 4454

(55%)

2803 (35%)

8329 (95%)

14 (5%)

No Dialogue 66

(1%)

2

(0%)

- -

1 24 hour schedule (excluding WeatherWatch overnight). 2 See Appendices 7-8. 3 SBS Television ‐ number for which more than one hour of programming was broadcast (see Appendix 3); SBS Radio ‐ number of language programs (see Appendix 7). 4 Languages other than English.

SBS Television

SBS ONE (24 Hours)

2012-13 2013-14

Hrs % Hrs %

LOTE (Hrs)1 3769 48 3638 45

English (Hrs) 3952 50 4454 55

No Dialogue 140 2 66 1

Total 7861 100 8158 100

SBS 2 (24 Hours)

LOTE (Hrs)1 5682 76 5116 65

English (Hrs) 1825 24 2803 35

No Dialogue 6 - 2 -

Total 7513 100 7921 100

NITV (24 Hours)

LOTE (Hrs)1 212 3 425 5

English (Hrs) 7414 97 8329 95

No Dialogue - - - -

Total 7626 100 8754 100

1 Languages other than English.

SBS Radio1

Analogue and digital networks2

SBS Radio 1

SBS Radio 2

SBS Radio 3 NRN

Hrs % Hrs % Hrs % Hrs %

LOTE (Hrs)1 106 89 119 100 22 96 113 95

English (Hrs) 13 11 - - 1 4 6 5

Total 119 100 119 100 23 100 119 100

1 The current SBS Radio schedule came into effect on 29 April 2013. The schedule did not change in 2013-14. 2 See Appendix 8. SBS Radio also broadcasts four digital only music channels (SBS Chill; SBS PopAraby; SBS PopAsia; SBS PopDesi) and special event radio.

135

SBS ONE

SBS ONE - 24 Hrs

Local Imported Total

Genre First Run Repeat Total % First Run Repeat Total % Total %

Comedy 13:10 20:10 33:20 1.6 21:00 3:10 24:10 0.4 57:30 0.7

Drama 4:00 26:50 30:50 1.5 180:18 99:35 279:53 4.6 310:43 3.8

Entertainment3 82:15 66:40 148:55 7.3 113:00 101:45 214:45 3.5 363:40 4.5

Factual 35:05 88:15 123:20 6.1 641:42 596:06 1237:48 20.2 1361:08 16.7

Film 13:15 6:50 20:05 1.0 300:35 481:28 782:03 12.8 802:08 9.8

Food 26:50 96:08 122:58 6.0 55:06 45:35 100:41 1.6 223:39 2.7

News / Current Affairs 603:56 103:21 707:17 34.8 3246:25 0:00 3246:25 53.0 3953:42 48.5

Short Films / Fillers 12:35 7:36 20:12 1.0 17:55 6:06 24:01 0.4 44:13 0.5

Sport4 640:04 146:10 786:14 38.6 184:50 29:15 214:05 3.5 1000:19 12.3

Other5 41:18 0:00 41:18 2.0 0:00 0:00 0:00 0.0 41:18 0.5

Total 1472:28 562:00 2034:29 100 4760:52 1363:00 6123:52 100 8158:22 100

SBS ONE - 6pm-midnight

Local Imported Total

Genre First Run Repeat Total % First Run Repeat Total % Total %

Comedy 13:10 16:30 29:40 2.9 19:30 3:10 22:40 1.9 52:20 2.4

Drama 4:00 7:45 11:45 1.2 146:48 23:45 170:33 14.6 182:18 8.3

Entertainment3 71:00 7:25 78:25 7.7 11:05 0:00 11:05 0.9 89:30 4.1

Factual 34:05 26:05 60:10 5.9 499:17 204:15 703:32 60.0 763:42 34.9

Film 11:15 1:15 12:30 1.2 109:55 79:50 189:45 16.2 202:15 9.2

Food 25:55 57:48 83:43 8.2 36:21 20:50 57:11 4.9 140:54 6.4

News / Current Affairs 580:21 4:11 584:32 57.4 0:00 0:00 0:00 0.0 584:32 26.7

Short Films / Fillers 1:16 0:10 1:26 0.1 1:36 0:10 1:46 0.2 3:12 0.1

Sport4 121:24 35:10 156:34 15.4 9:25 6:00 15:25 1.3 171:59 7.9

Other5 0:00 0:00 0:00 0.0 0:00 0:00 0:00 0.0 0:00 0.0

Total 862:26 156:19 1018:45 100 833:57 338:00 1171:57 100 2190:42 100

A Appe pe p nd dix ix 2 2 SB BS S Te T le e evi v s sion n n: P Prog og gra am mm m m ing g g br roa a adc d a as st ho h u u urs s1 1 b by y y ge en nre e, run2 and source

136 SBS Annual Report 2013-14

SBS 2

SBS 2 - 24 Hrs

Local Imported Total

Genre First Run Repeat Total % First Run Repeat Total % Total %

Comedy 31:30 28:35 60:05 5.3 258:35 87:35 346:10 5.1 406:15 5.1

Drama 0:00 0:00 0:00 0.0 146:45 92:40 239:25 3.5 239:25 3.0

Entertainment3 136:22 157:33 293:55 25.9 334:45 412:30 747:15 11.0 1041:10 13.1

Factual 4:45 1:00 5:45 0.5 290:05 356:20 646:25 9.5 652:10 8.2

Film 0:00 0:00 0:00 0.0 173:30 411:35 585:05 8.6 585:05 7.4

Food 0:00 0:00 0:00 0.0 8:20 45:25 53:45 0.8 53:45 0.7

News / Current Affairs 77:35 72:55 150:30 13.3 4060:49 0:00 4060:49 59.8 4211:19 53.2

Short Films / Fillers 10:53 0:26 11:20 1.0 20:32 7:01 27:34 0.4 38:54 0.5

Sport4 325:40 178:30 504:10 44.4 62:50 17:00 79:50 1.2 584:00 7.4

Other5 109:24 0:00 109:24 9.6 0:00 0:00 0:00 0.0 109:24 1.4

Total 696:09 438:59 1135:09 100 5356:11 1430:06 6786:18 100 7921:27 100

SBS 2 - 6pm-midnight

Local Imported Total

Genre First Run Repeat Total % First Run Repeat Total % Total %

Comedy 31:30 28:30 60:00 10.7 210:00 59:45 269:45 16.4 329:45 14.9

Drama 0:00 0:00 0:00 0.0 141:25 54:55 196:20 11.9 196:20 8.9

Entertainment3 40:12 32:48 73:00 13.0 267:05 261:20 528:25 32.1 601:25 27.3

Factual 4:45 1:00 5:45 1.0 199:45 112:25 312:10 19.0 317:55 14.4

Film 0:00 0:00 0:00 0.0 130:00 138:15 268:15 16.3 268:15 12.2

Food 0:00 0:00 0:00 0.0 8:20 1:30 9:50 0.6 9:50 0.4

News/Current Affairs 77:35 56:45 134:20 23.9 0:00 0:00 0:00 0.0 134:20 6.1

Short Films/Fillers 6:22 0:10 6:32 1.2 12:45 4:52 17:37 1.1 24:10 1.1

Sport4 226:55 54:25 281:20 50.2 26:05 17:00 43:05 2.6 324:25 14.7

Other5 0:00 0:00 0:00 0.0 0:00 0:00 0:00 0.0 0:00 0.0

Total 387:19 173:38 560:57 100 995:25 650:02 1645:27 100 2206:25 100

137

NITV

NITV - 24 Hrs

Local Imported Total

Genre First Run Repeat Total % First Run Repeat Total % Total %

Children’s 0:00 126:30 126:30 1.8 0:00 0:00 0:00 0.0 126:30 1.4

Comedy 1:30 1:30 3:00 0.0 24:00 71:55 95:55 5.0 98:55 1.1

Drama 22:15 75:12 97:27 1.4 37:30 78:25 115:55 6.0 213:22 2.4

Education 35:51 1086:25 1122:16 16.4 14:00 349:00 363:00 18.9 1485:16 17.0

Entertainment3 44:00 2521:25 2565:25 37.5 3:30 362:30 366:00 19.1 2931:25 33.5

Factual 528:38 655:39 1184:17 17.3 97:45 545:45 643:30 33.6 1827:47 20.9

Film 4:30 50:45 55:15 0.8 29:40 58:55 88:35 4.6 143:50 1.6

Food 6:53 18:37 25:30 0.4 0:00 84:30 84:30 4.4 110:00 1.3

News/Current Affairs 195:30 523:30 719:00 10.5 70:00 61:30 131:30 6.9 850:30 9.7

Short Films/Fillers 2:53 63:25 66:18 1.0 0:30 0:30 1:00 0.1 67:18 0.8

Sport4 193:10 679:50 873:00 12.8 14:30 12:00 26:30 1.4 899:30 10.3

Total 1035:10 5802:49 6837:59 100 291:25 1625:00 1916:25 100 8754:24 100

NITV - 6pm-midnight

Local Imported Total

Genre First Run Repeat Total % First Run Repeat Total % Total %

Children’s 0:00 0:00 0:00 0.0 0:00 0:00 0:00 9.1 0:00 0.0

Comedy 1:30 0:00 1:30 0.1 24:00 41:55 65:55 12.7 67:25 3.1

Drama 22:15 51:03 73:18 5.0 37:30 54:25 91:55 4.3 165:13 7.5

Education 4:02 27:00 31:02 2.1 1:00 30:00 31:00 2.9 62:02 2.8

Entertainment3 40:00 155:20 195:20 13.3 3:30 17:20 20:50 44.5 216:10 9.9

Factual 369:06 220:52 589:59 40.1 95:45 226:00 321:45 11.0 911:44 41.6

Film 4:30 45:15 49:45 3.4 29:40 50:10 79:50 5.5 129:35 5.9

Food 6:53 9:07 16:00 1.1 0:00 40:00 40:00 8.8 56:00 2.6

News / Current Affairs 40:00 319:30 359:30 24.4 50:00 13:30 63:30 0.1 423:00 19.3

Short Films / Fillers 1:09 13:55 15:04 1.0 0:30 0:15 0:45 1.0 15:49 0.7

Sport4 92:50 47:10 140:00 9.5 0:30 6:30 7:00 9.1 147:00 6.7

Total 582:16 889:12 1471:29 100 242:25 480:05 722:30 100 2193:59 100

1 Hours and minutes . 2 First run refers to fi rst run on the channel. 3 Entertainment includes art, entertainment series, and special events. 4 Local sport includes SBS coverage of international sports events where SBS has produced and broadcast material in relation to the event, the content is tailored for

an Australian audience (including SBS studio content, commentary team, journalistic input) and the program is presented as produced or co-produced by SBS. 5 Other includes WeatherWatch and Music (from 5am) and WeatherWatch fi ller used in the event a program (usually WorldWatch news bulletins) cannot be broadcast as scheduled. WeatherWatch overnight is not included. The WeatherWatch service is not broadcast on NITV.

A Appe pe p nd dix ix 2 2 SB BS S Te T le e evi v s sion n n: P Prog og gra am mm m m ing g g br roa a adc d a as st ho h u u urs s1 1 b by y y ge en nre e, run2 and source (c ( on onti tin nue ed d)

138 SBS Annual Report 2013-14

A App pe pend d dix ix 3 3 SB BS S Te T le evi v si s on n n: La Lan ng gua ag ge es s br br broa adc c cas a tt

SBS ONE

Language HH:MM1

%

LOTE2

%

Total

Amharic 2:42 0.07 0.03

Arabic 191:03 5.25 2.34

Aramaic 2:20 0.06 0.03

Bengali 4:10 0.11 0.05

Bosnian 2:25 0.07 0.03

Bulgarian 2:42 0.07 0.03

Cantonese 125:20 3.45 1.54

Catalan 3:44 0.10 0.05

Croatian 1:44 0.05 0.02

Czech 13:39 0.38 0.17

Danish 78:14 2.15 0.96

Dari 2:53 0.08 0.04

Dutch 16:54 0.46 0.21

Estonian 1:20 0.04 0.02

Farsi 10:37 0.29 0.13

Filipino 180:39 4.97 2.21

Finnish 5:00 0.14 0.06

Flemish 2:05 0.06 0.03

French 495:31 13.62 6.07

Gaelic 2:09 0.06 0.03

German 253:43 6.98 3.11

Greek 322:21 8.86 3.95

Hebrew 35:32 0.98 0.44

Hindi 134:43 3.70 1.65

Hungarian 6:22 0.18 0.08

Indonesian 5:20 0.15 0.07

Irish 2:34 0.07 0.03

Italian 354:48 9.75 4.35

Language HH:MM1

%

LOTE2

%

Total

Japanese 208:13 5.72 2.55

Korean 220:00 6.05 2.70

Kurdish 1:20 0.04 0.02

Kyrgyz 1:31 0.04 0.02

Latin 2:31 0.07 0.03

Mandarin 174:30 4.80 2.14

Norwegian 11:48 0.32 0.14

Pashto 2:16 0.06 0.03

Polish 10:10 0.28 0.12

Portuguese 18:30 0.51 0.23

Punjabi 1:25 0.04 0.02

Romanian 9:06 0.25 0.11

Russian 23:57 0.66 0.29

Serbian 5:07 0.14 0.06

Sinhalese 1:10 0.03 0.01

Slovene 1:30 0.04 0.02

Spanish 430:42 11.84 5.28

Swedish 51:46 1.42 0.63

Thai 3:55 0.11 0.05

Turkish 173:50 4.78 2.13

Urdu 1:06 0.03 0.01

Vietnamese 5:31 0.15 0.07

LOTE < 1 Hr (74) 16:50 0.46 0.21

Total LOTE 3637:39 100 44.59

Total English 4454:36 54.60

Total No Dialogue 66:05 0.81

Total 8158:22 100

139

SBS 2

Language HH:MM1

%

LOTE2

%

Total

Afrikaans 1:02 0.02 0.01

Albanian 2:00 0.04 0.03

Arabic 72:07 1.41 0.91

Guarani 0:55 0.02 0.01

Bengali 1:52 0.04 0.02

Cantonese 212:01 4.14 2.68

Catalan 1:46 0.03 0.02

Croatian 208:01 4.07 2.63

Czech 5:30 0.11 0.07

Danish 12:49 0.25 0.16

Dutch 182:33 3.57 2.30

Filipino 80:04 1.56 1.01

Finnish 7:55 0.15 0.10

Flemish 7:04 0.14 0.09

French 429:56 8.40 5.43

German 204:03 3.99 2.58

Greek 249:16 4.87 3.15

Hebrew 10:21 0.20 0.13

Hindi 45:11 0.88 0.57

Hungarian 31:00 0.61 0.39

Icelandic 4:00 0.08 0.05

Indonesian 228:40 4.47 2.89

Italian 192:32 3.76 2.43

Language HH:MM1

%

LOTE2

%

Total

Japanese 470:59 9.21 5.95

Kinyarwanda 1:28 0.03 0.02

Korean 240:02 4.69 3.03

Macedonian 196:44 3.85 2.48

Maltese 48:30 0.95 0.61

Mandarin 361:26 7.06 4.56

Norwegian 32:12 0.63 0.41

Polish 175:40 3.43 2.22

Portuguese 311:42 6.09 3.93

Russian 172:38 3.37 2.18

Serbian 233:12 4.56 2.94

Spanish 363:51 7.11 4.59

Swedish 43:05 0.84 0.54

Taiwanese 1:00 0.02 0.01

Thai 11:22 0.22 0.14

Tsotsitaal 1:40 0.03 0.02

Turkish 75:31 1.48 0.95

Urdu 179:30 3.51 2.27

LOTE < 1 Hr (32) 4:52 0.10 0.06

Total LOTE 5116:19 100 64.59

Total English 2802:54 35.38

Total No Dialogue 2:14 0.03

Total 7921:27 100

A Appe pe p nd dix ix 3 3 SB BS S Te T le e evi v s sion n n: L Lan ng gua ag ge es s br br broa adc c cas a t t (c (co onti tiinu n ed d e )))

NITV

Language HH:MM1

%

LOTE2

%

Total

Afrikaans 3:15 0.76 0.04

Arrernte 29:20 6.90 0.34

Djinba 1:50 0.43 0.02

French 11:34 2.73 0.13

Gaelic 5:22 1.27 0.06

Inuktitut 4:00 0.94 0.05

Inuktitut (Eastern Canadian) 3:03 0.72 0.03

Irish 4:00 0.94 0.05

Kalaallisut 1:28 0.35 0.02

Kalaw Kawaw Ya 5:30 1.29 0.06

Maori 258:20 60.80 2.95

Martu Wangka 6:15 1.47 0.07

Masai 2:00 0.47 0.02

Navajo 1:30 0.35 0.02

Ngarluma 5:30 1.29 0.06

Norwegian 2:30 0.59 0.03

Nunggubuyu 1:33 0.37 0.02

Pidgin 1:00 0.24 0.01

Language HH:MM1

%

LOTE2

%

Total

Pitjantjatjara 5:15 1.24 0.06

Russian 7:30 1.77 0.09

Sami 8:52 2.09 0.10

Samoan 2:00 0.47 0.02

Sepedi 1:58 0.47 0.02

Spanish 24:01 5.65 0.27

Swahili 1:30 0.35 0.02

Swedish 1:30 0.35 0.02

Taiwanese 2:15 0.53 0.03

Tok Pisin 1:25 0.33 0.02

Warlpiri 3:00 0.71 0.03

Worrorra 1:30 0.35 0.02

Yolgnu Matha 11:05 2.61 0.13

LOTE < 1 hr (15) 4:58 1.17 0.06

Total LOTE 424:53 100 4.85

Total English 8329:31 95.15

Total 8754:24 100

1 Hours and minutes. 2 Languages other than English.

140 SBS Annual Report 2013-14

A App pe pend d dix ix 4 4 SB BS S Te T le evi v si s on n n: C Cultt ltur u e es s b broa a adca cas stt

SBS ONE Afghan African American Albanian n Argentine Armenian Australian Australian Indigenous Austrian Azerbaijani Bangladeshi Barbadian Belgian Belizean Bengali Beninese Bolivian Bosnian Brazilian British Bulgarian Burmese Cambodian Canadian Catalan Chadian Chechen

Chilean Chinese Colombian Congolese Costa Rican Croatian Cuban Cypriot Czech Danish Djiboutian Dominican Republican Dutch East Timorese Ecuadorian Egyptian Emirati English Eritrean Estonian Ethiopian Fijian Filipino Finnish Flemish French

Georgian German Greek Greenlandic Guatemalan Guinean Haitian Hong Kong Hungarian Icelandic Indian Indonesian Inuit Iranian Iraqi Irish Israeli Italian Jamaican Japanese Jordanian Kazakhstani Kenyan Korean Kurdish Kuwaiti Kyrgyz

Laotian Latvian Lebanese Liberian Lithuanian Malagasy Malawian Malaysian Malian Maltese Maori Mauritanian Mauritian Melanesian Mexican Micronesian Mongolian Montenegrin Moroccan Mozambican Namibian Nepalese New Zealand Nicaraguan Nigerian Nigerien Norwegian

Omani Pakistani Palestinian Panamanian Papua New Guinean Peruvian Polish Polynesian Portuguese Puerto Rican Romanian Romany Russian Samoan Saudi Arabian Scottish Serbian Sierra Leonean Singaporean Slovak Slovenian Solomon Islander Somali South African Spanish Sri Lankan

Sudanese Swedish Swiss Syrian Tahitian Taiwanese Tajik Tanzanian Thai Tibetan Tongan Trinidadian Turkish Ugandan Ukrainian Uruguayan Uzbekistani Venezuelan Vietnamese Welsh Yemeni Zambian

SBS 2 Afghan Albanian Algerian American Argentine Australian Australian Indigenous Austrian Azerbaijani Bangladeshi Belgian Bolivian Bosnian Brazilian British Bulgarian Cambodian

Cameroonian Canadian Central African Chilean Chinese Colombian Congolese Corsican Costa Rican Croatian Cuban Cypriot Czech Danish Dutch Egyptian Emirati English

Ethiopian Filipino Finnish Flemish French German Ghanaian Greek Hong Kong Hungarian Icelandic Indian Indonesian Iranian Iraqi Irish Israeli Italian

Jamaican Japanese Korean Kosovan Kurdish Latvian Lebanese Lithuanian Luxembourg Macedonian Malagasy Malaysian Maltese Maori Mauritanian Mexican Moldovan Montenegrin

Moroccan Mozambican New Zealand Norwegian Pakistani Palestinian Papua New Guinean Peruvian Polish Polynesian Portuguese Russian Samoan Saudi Arabian Scottish Serbian Singaporean

Slovak Slovenian South African Spanish Sri Lankan Swedish Swiss Taiwanese Thai Turkish Ugandan Ukrainian Uruguayan Venezuelan Vietnamese Welsh

NITV American American Indian Argentine Australian Australian Indigenous Beninese Canadian Chinese

Costa Rican Danish Dominican Republican English Fijian French Greenlandic Hong Kong

Indian Indonesian Inuit Irish Italian Japanese Jordanian Kenyan Liberian

Maori Mexican Namibian New Zealand Ni-Vanuatu Pacifi c Islands Papua New Guinean Peruvian

Polish Rwandan Sami Samoan Scottish Senegalese South African Spanish Swedish

Syrian Taiwanese Tibetan Timorese Ugandan Welsh

141

A Appe pe p nd dix ix 5 5 SB BS S Te T le e evi v s sion n n: S SB BS S S co om mm mis s ssi s s on ne ed d pr ro ogr gram m ms fi firs st t ru un n n

SBS ONE and SBS 2 Commissioned TV Programs First Run

Genre/Title Episodes Hours

Entertainment

Behind the Front Door 6 3:00

Ethnic Business Awards 2013 1 2:00

The Crown Prince Couple’s Awards 1 1:45

The Eurovision Quiz Contest 2014 5 2:30

The Full Brazilian 18 18:00

The Observer Effect 15 15:00

A Pang for Brasil 2 2:00

RocKwiz (Series 11) 9 9:00

RocKwiz (Series 12) 14 14:00

RocKwiz Backstage at the Bluesfest 1 1:00

SBS 2 Film Presenter Series 2013 1 0:10

Sydney Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras 2014 1 1:30

Tropfest 2013 1 2:50

Tropfest TV 2013 13 6:25

Tropfest TV 2013 Snacks 18 1:27

Sub-total hours 80:37

Factual

Australia’s Secret Heroes 3 3:00

Change My Race 1 1:00

Jess Mauboy’s Road To Eurovision 1 1:00

JFK: The Smoking Gun 1 1:35

Life On Us 2 2:00

My America 1 1:00

The Network 1 1:00

Once Upon A Time In Punchbowl 2 2:00

Persons of Interest (Series 1) 4 4:00

The President Vs The Pirates 1 1:00

Surgery Ship 1 1:00

Tales of the Unexpected 3 3:00

Sub-total hours 21:35

Genre/Title Episodes Hours

Food

Destination Flavour Japan 10 5:00

Luke Nguyen’s France (Series 1) 8 4:00

Luke Nguyen’s Memories Of The Mekong (Series 1) 2 2:00

Mexican Fiesta with Peter Kuruvita (Series 1) 10 5:00

Shane Delia’s Spice Journey (Series 1) 1 0:30

This Is Brazil! (Series 1) 6 6:00

Sub-total hours 22:30

Comedy

Housos (Series 2) 9 4:35

Legally Brown (Series 1) 10 5:00

Stand Up @ Bella Union (Series 1) 10 5:00

The Cradle of Comedy (Series 1) 1 1:00

Sub-total hours 15:35

Drama

Better Man 2 4:00

Sub-Total hours 4:00

Total hours 140:17

142 SBS Annual Report 2013-14

NITV Commissioned TV Programs First Run

Genre/Title Episodes Hours

Youth Programs

Move It Mob Style (Series 3) 20 10:00

Sub-total hours 10:00

Drama

Hard Rock Medical 13 6:30

Sub-total hours 6:30

Regional, Remote & Emerging Initiative: Our Stories Our Way, Everyday

Our Stories Our Way, Everyday 112 28:00

Remembering Our Heroes: Anzac Specials 10 2:00

Sub-total hours 30:00

Factual

Tipping Points 6 6:00

Characters of Broome 2 1:00

Colour Theory 2 4 2:00

From the Western Frontier 3 1:30

Sub-total hours 10:30

Food

Kriol Kitchen (Series 1) 10 5:00

Sub-total hours 5:00

Entertainment

The Marngrook Footy Show 2013 13 19:30

The Marngrook Footy Show 2014 16 24:00

Sub-total hours 43:30

Total hours 105:30

143

SBS ONE and SBS 2 programs commissioned in 2013-14

Genre/Title Episodes Hours1

Comedy

Stand Up @ Bella Union (Series 1) 10 10:00

Sub-total hours 10:00

Entertainment

31 Nights in Brazil 31 1:02

A Pang For Brasil 2 2:00

Crown Prince Couple’s Awards 1 1:30

Eurovision MCA Event 2013 1 0:10

Eurovision Quiz Contest 2014 5 2:30

Eurovision Song Contest 2014 3 9:00

Eurovision Song Contest Junior 2013 1 1:00

Legally Brown (Series 2) 10 5:00

19 Reasons To Love If You Are The One 1 1:00

RocKwiz Backstage At Bluesfest 1 1:00

RocKwiz (Series 12) 14 14:00

SBS 2 Film Presenter Series 2014 51 1:42

SBS ONE Film Presenter Series 2014 53 1:46

Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras 2014 1 1:20

Taste Le Tour With Gabriel Gate (Series 10) 21 1:45

Jessica Mauboy Eurovision Act 2014 1 0:05

The Full Brazilian (Series 1) 26 26:00

Tropfest 2013 1 2:00

Tropfest 2014 1 2:00

Tropfest TV 2013 13 6:30

Sub-total hours 81:20

Factual

After The Wave 1 1:00

Angry Mile, The 3 3:00

DNA Nation 3 3:00

Expendables - Vietnam 3 3:00

Go Back To Where You Came From (Series 3) 3 3:00

Harry 1 1:00

Inside The Inferno 2 2:00

Jess Mauboy’s Road To Eurovision 1 1:00

Living With The Enemy 6 6:00

Shaun Micallef Gets Religion 1 1:00

Struggle Street 3 3:00

Uranium 3 3:00

Who Do You Think You Are? (Series 7) 8 8:00

Sub-total hours 38:00

Genre/Title Episodes Hours1

Food

A Christmas Feast With Peter Kuruvita 1 1:00

Destination Flavour - Adam’s Best Bites 1 0:30

Destination Flavour Japan 10 5:00

Destination Flavour Christmas 1 1:30

Destination Flavour Down Under Best Bites 1 1:00

Destination Flavour Down Under 10 5:00

Destination Flavour Japan - Best Bites 1 1:00

Gourmet Farmer Afl oat 6 6:00

Luke Nguyen’s Memories Of The Mekong 2 2:00

Luke Nguyen’s UK 10 5:00

Made In Italy With Silvia Colloca 10 5:00

Poh & Co 6 6:00

Shane Delia’s Spice Journey - Turkey 10 5:00

The Best Of My Sri Lanka With Peter Kuruvita 1 1:00

Sub-total hours 45:00

Total hours 174:20

1 Scheduled hours.

A Appe pe p nd dix ix 6 6 SB BS S Te T le e evi v s sion n n: P Prog og gra am ms m com om omm mis ss sion ne ed d

144 SBS Annual Report 2013-14

NITV p rograms commissioned in 2013-14

Genre/Title Episodes Hours2

Youth Programs

Move It Mob Style (Series 3) 20 10:00

Move It Mob Style (Series 4) 20 10:00

Sub-total hours 20:00

Drama

Hard Rock Medical 13 6:30

Sub-total hours 6:30

Regional, Remote & Emerging Initiative: Our Stories Our Way, Everyday

Our Stories Our Way, Everyday (Series 1) 137 34:15

Our Stories Our Way, Everyday (Series 2) 128 32:00

Remembering Our Heroes: Anzac Specials 11 2:15

Songlines to Screen 10 1:40

Sub-total hours 70:10

Interstitials and Development

My Country 15 0:45

JM Healthy Tips 10 0:30

Cash Money 10 0:30

Sub-total hours 1:45

Food

Kriol Kitchen (Series 1) 10 5:00

Kriol Kitchen (Series 2) 10 5:00

Sub-total hours 10:00

Genre/Title Episodes Hours2

Factual

Tipping Points 6 6:00

Characters of Broome 2 1:00

Milpirri - Winds of Change 1 1:00

Colour Theory 2 4 2:00

Innocence Betrayed 1 1:00

Over The Edge 1 1:00

Protecting Manawangku 1 0:30

Tribal Scent 1 1:00

Storytime 20 3:00

Childrens Language Segment 20 5:00

From the Western Frontier 3 1:30

NITV Spirit Award 1 0:30

Kings Seal 1 1:00

Our Spirit to C Gen 1 0:30

I Heart My People 3 1:30

Putaparri 1 1:00

First School at Middle Beach 1 0:30

Sub-total hours 28:00

Entertainment

The Marngrook Footy Show 2014 29 43:30

Sub-total hours 43:30

Total hours 179:55

2 Scheduled hours.

145

Ap App pe end dix ix 7 7 SB BS S Ra R d di dio:: La a angu uag ag ge p pr prog ogra a ams s m m b bro ro r ad dc ca ast s

Language Program

Analog / Digital Digital Analog

Online5 Mobile6 Digital TV

SBS Radio 11

SBS Radio 22

SBS Radio 33 NRN4

Albanian 2 - - 1 ü ü ü

Amharic 2 - - 1 ü ü ü

Arabic - 14 - 7 ü ü ü

Armenian - - 1 - ü ü ü

Assyrian - 2 - 1 ü ü ü

Bangla - 2 - 1 ü ü ü

Bosnian 2 - - 1 ü ü ü

Bulgarian - - 1 - ü ü ü

Burmese - 2 - 1 ü ü ü

Cantonese 14 - - 7 ü ü ü

Cook Islander Maori - - 1 - ü ü ü

Croatian 5 - - 2 ü ü ü

Czech - - 1 - ü ü ü

Danish - - 1 - ü ü ü

Dari - 2 - - ü ü ü

Dinka 2 - - 1 ü ü ü

Dutch - 2 - 1 ü ü ü

Estonian - - 1 - ü ü ü

Fijian - - 1 - ü ü ü

Filipino - 7 - 5 ü ü ü

Finnish - - 1 - ü ü ü

French 4 - - 2 ü ü ü

German - 7 - 4 ü ü ü

Greek 14 - - 7 ü ü ü

Gujarati - 2 - 1 ü ü ü

Hebrew/Yiddish 2 - - 2 ü ü ü

Hindi - 7 - 5 ü ü ü

Hmong - 2 - 1 ü ü ü

Hungarian 2 - - 1 ü ü ü

Indonesian - 4 - 2 ü ü ü

Italian - 14 - 7 ü ü ü

Japanese 3 - - 1 ü ü ü

Kannada - - 1 - ü ü ü

Khmer 2 - - 1 ü ü ü

Korean 7 - - 4 ü ü ü

Kurdish - 2 - 1 ü ü ü

Lao - 2 - - ü ü ü

Latvian - - 1 - ü ü ü

Lithuanian - - 1 - ü ü ü

Macedonian 5 - - 2 ü ü ü

Malay - - 1 - ü ü ü

Malayalam - 2 - 1 ü ü ü

Maltese - 2 2 - ü ü ü

Mandarin 14 - - 7 ü ü ü

Maori - - 1 - ü ü ü

Nepali - 2 - 1 ü ü ü

146 SBS Annual Report 2013-14

Language Program

Analog / Digital Digital Analog

Online5 Mobile6 Digital TV

SBS Radio 11

SBS Radio 22

SBS Radio 33 NRN4

Norwegian - - 1 - ü ü ü

Pashto - 2 - 1 ü ü ü

Persian - 2 - 1 ü ü ü

Polish 4 - - 2 ü ü ü

Portuguese - 2 - 1 ü ü ü

Punjabi - 5 - 2 ü ü ü

Romanian - - 1 - ü ü ü

Russian - 3 - 1 ü ü ü

Samoan 2 - - 1 ü ü ü

Serbian 4 - - 2 ü ü ü

Sinhalese - 4 - 2 ü ü ü

Slovak - - 1 - ü ü ü

Slovenian - - 1 - ü ü ü

Somali - 2 - 1 ü ü ü

Spanish - 7 - 5 ü ü ü

Swahili - 2 - 1 ü ü ü

Swedish - - 1 - ü ü ü

Tamil - 4 - 2 ü ü ü

Tigrinya 2 - 1 ü ü ü

Thai - 2 - 1 ü ü ü

Tongan - - 1 - ü ü ü

Turkish - 5 - 2 ü ü ü

Ukrainian - - 1 - ü ü ü

Urdu - 2 - 1 ü ü ü

Vietnamese 14 - - 7 ü ü ü

Total LOTE

106

(89%)

119

(100%)

22

(96%)

113

(95%) - - -

African - - 1 - ü ü ü

Living Black (Aboriginal) 3 - - 1 ü ü ü

SBS World News 10 - - 5 ü ü ü

Total English 13 (11%) - 1 (4%) 6 (5%)

Total

119

(100%)

119

(100%)

23

(100%)

119

(100%)

1 Analog ‐ Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra and Wollongong AM; Digital ‐ Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney and Canberra (trial). 2 Analog ‐ Sydney, Melbourne and Canberra FM; Digital ‐ Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney and Canberra (trial). 3 Digital only ‐ Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney and Canberra (trial). SBS Chill (repeat) also broadcast on SBS Radio 3. 4 Analog only ‐ AM and FM frequencies in major centres around Australia (see Appendix X). 5 sbs.com.au/radio 6 SBS Your Language app.

147

Ap App pe end dix ix 8 8 SB BS S Ra R d di dio Sc che h h d dule e l s

SBS Radio 11

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

6am SBS

World News SBS World News SBS

World News SBS World News SBS

World News Tigrinya Dinka

7am Mandarin Mandarin Mandarin Mandarin Mandarin Mandarin Mandarin

8am Mandarin Mandarin Mandarin Mandarin Mandarin Mandarin Mandarin

9am Cantonese Cantonese Cantonese Cantonese Cantonese Cantonese Cantonese

10am Cantonese Cantonese Cantonese Cantonese Cantonese Cantonese Cantonese

11am Croatian Croatian Croatian Croatian Croatian Dinka Hebrew/Yiddish

12pm Macedonian Macedonian Macedonian Macedonian Macedonian Khmer Hebrew/Yiddish

1pm Living Black French Living Black French Living Black French French

2pm Polish Hungarian Polish Tigrinya Polish Hungarian Polish

3pm Serbian Serbian Khmer Serbian Bosnian Serbian Bosnian

4pm Greek Greek Greek Greek Greek Greek Greek

5pm Greek Greek Greek Greek Greek Greek Greek

6pm SBS

World News SBS World News SBS

World News SBS World News SBS

World News Albanian Albanian

7pm Vietnamese Vietnamese Vietnamese Vietnamese Vietnamese Vietnamese Vietnamese

8pm Vietnamese Vietnamese Vietnamese Vietnamese Vietnamese Vietnamese Vietnamese

9pm Korean Korean Korean Korean Korean Korean Korean

10pm Amharic Japanese Samoan Japanese Amharic Japanese Samoan

11pm Overnight Programming2

1 Sydney, Canberra and Wollongong, and Melbourne AM; digital radio; online ‐ sbs.com.au/radio; digital TV; and SBS Your Language mobile app. 2 Overnight programming: BBC World Service (in language).

148 SBS Annual Report 2014

SBS Radio 21

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

6am Arabic Arabic Arabic Arabic Arabic Arabic Arabic

7am Arabic Arabic Arabic Arabic Arabic Arabic Arabic

8am Italian Italian Italian Italian Italian Italian Italian

9am Italian Italian Italian Italian Italian Italian Italian

10am Filipino Filipino Filipino Filipino Filipino Filipino Filipino

11am Sinhalese Sinhalese Dutch Sinhalese Sinhalese Dutch Hmong

12pm Russian Pashto Portuguese Russian Maltese Russian Portuguese

1pm Spanish Spanish Spanish Spanish Spanish Spanish Spanish

2pm Turkish Turkish Turkish Turkish Turkish Maltese Kurdish

3pm Indonesian Persian Indonesian Pashto Indonesian Persian Indonesian

4pm Lao Dari Gujarati Dari Gujarati Nepali Nepali

5pm Hindi Hindi Hindi Hindi Hindi Hindi Hindi

6pm Bangla Swahili Urdu Hmong Kurdish Bangla Urdu

7pm German German German German German German German

8pm Tamil Assyrian Tamil Malayalam Tamil Assyrian Tamil

9pm Punjabi Punjabi Punjabi Punjabi Punjabi Lao Malayalam

10pm Thai Burmese Somali Thai Somali Burmese Swahili

11pm Overnight Programming2

1 Sydney, Canberra and Melbourne FM; digital radio; online ‐ sbs.com.au/radio; digital TV; and SBS Your Language mobile app. 2 Overnight programming: BBC World Service Vernacular (in language).

149

National Radio Network1

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

6am Arabic Arabic Arabic Arabic Arabic Arabic Arabic

7am Mandarin Mandarin Mandarin Mandarin Mandarin Mandarin Mandarin

8am Italian Italian Italian Italian Italian Italian Italian

9am Cantonese Cantonese Cantonese Cantonese Cantonese Cantonese Cantonese

10am Filipino Filipino Filipino Filipino Filipino Tigrinya Hmong

11am Croatian Sinhalese Dutch Croatian Sinhalese Dinka Hebrew/Yiddish

12pm Macedonian Pashto Portuguese Macedonian Living Black Russian Hebrew/Yiddish

1pm Spanish Spanish Spanish Spanish Spanish French French

2pm Polish Turkish Polish Turkish Gujarati Hungarian Kurdish

3pm Indonesian Serbian Khmer Serbian Indonesian Persian Bosnian

4pm Greek Greek Greek Greek Greek Greek Greek

5pm Hindi Hindi Hindi Hindi Hindi Bangla Nepali

6pm

SBS World News SBS World News

SBS World News SBS World News

SBS World News Albanian Urdu

7pm Vietnamese Vietnamese Vietnamese Vietnamese Vietnamese Vietnamese Vietnamese

8pm German German Tamil German German Assyrian Tamil

9pm Korean Punjabi Korean Punjabi Korean Korean Malayalam

10pm Amharic Japanese Samoan Thai Somali Burmese Swahili

11pm Overnight Programming2

1 An amalgamation of SBS Radio 1 and SBS Radio 2 programming; available on AM and FM frequencies in major centres around Australia (see Appendix 13). 2 BBC World Service Vernacular (In language).

SBS Radio 31

SBS Radio 3 features regular program ming in 22 languages (see table), and SBS Chill.

Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

12pm Maltese Tongan Maltese

1pm African English Fijian Finnish Estonian

2pm Romanian Cook Island Maori Swedish Lithuanian

3pm Kannada Maori2 Norwegian Slovak

4pm Ukrainian Malay2 Danish Bulgarian

5pm Armenian3 Latvian Czech Slovenian

1 Digital radio; digital TV; and mobile apps. 2 Programs in recess. 3 The Armenian program is also repeated once on SBS Radio 3.

Digital Channels

SBS Radio 1 SBS Radio 2 SBS Radio 3 SBS Radio 4 - special event radio including Eurovision programming, SBS PopBrazil, FIFA World Cup programming and A-League programming SBS Chill SBS PopAraby SBS PopAsia SBS PopDesi

Ap App pe end dix ix 8 8 SB BS S Ra R d di dio Sc che h h d dule e l s (c c (con ntin nu n ed ed))

150 SBS Annual Report 2014

Languages Broadcast

SBS ONE

Language Country Hours 1

%

LOTE 2

%

Total

Arabic UAE 182:00 6 5

Cantonese Hong Kong 121:20 4 3

Filipino Philippines 212:20 6 6

French France 303:20 8 9

German Germany 182:00 6 5

Greek Greece 364:00 10 10

Hindi India 151:40 6 4

Italian Italy 242:40 6 7

Japanese Japan 212:20 7 6

Korean Korea 212:20 7 6

Mandarin China 182:00 6 5

Spanish (Spain) Spain 364:00 8 10

Turkish Turkey 182:00 6 5

Total LOTE 2912:00 100 82

English (DW) Germany 130:00 4

English (PBS) USA 260:00 7

English (Al Jazeera) Qatar 156:00 4

English (France 24) France 75:00 2

Total English 621:00 18

Total 3533:00 100

1 Scheduled hours as at 30.06.13. Hours may vary due to special event coverage or non-delivery of bulletin. 2 Languages other than English.

SBS TWO

Language Country Hours

%

LOTE

%

Total

Cantonese Hong Kong 104:00 3.1 3

Croatian Croatia 212:20 6.3 5

Dutch Netherlands 156:00 4.6 4

French France 260:00 7.7 6

German Germany 130:00 3.8 3

Greek Greece 238:20 7.0 6

Hungarian Hungary 26:00 0.8 1

Indonesian Indonesia 242:40 7.2 6

Italian Italy 173:20 5.1 4

Japanese Japan 182:00 5.4 4

Korean Korea 130:00 3.8 3

Macedonian Macedonia 212:20 6.3 5

Maltese Malta 52:00 1.5 1

Mandarin China 156:00 4.6 4

Polish Poland 182:00 5.4 4

Portuguese Portugal 182:00 5.4 4

Russian Russia 182:00 5.4 4

Serbian Serbia 182:00 5.4 4

Spanish (Chile) Chile 26:00 0.8 1

Spanish (Spain) Spain 173:20 5.1 4

Urdu Pakistan 182:00 5.4 4

Total 3384:20 100 82

English (CCTV NEWS) China 208:00 5

English (DW) Germany 104:00 3

English (France 24) France 104:00 3

English (NHK World) France 208:00 5

English (RT) Russia 104:00 3

Total English 728:00 18

Total 4112:20 100

A App pe pend d dix ix 9 9 Wo Worl rld dW Wat at a ch ch: L La L ng ngu ua age es s b broa a adc cas st t an nd d s sou ur urce e b bro road dc ca ast s ers

151

WorldWatch: Sources

Country Language Broadcaster

Chile Spanish TVN Televisión Nacional de Chile

China Mandarin CCTV 4 China Central Television

China English CCTV News China Central Television

Croatia Croatian HRT Hrvatska radiotelevizija

France French FT2 France Télévisions SA

France English F24 Audiovisuel Extérieur de la France

Germany German DW Deutsche Welle

Germany English DW Deutsche Welle

Greece Greek ERT Hellenic Broadcasting Corporation

Hong Kong Cantonese TVB Television Broadcasts Limited

Hungary Hungarian DTV Duna Televízió

India Hindi NDTV New Delhi Television Limited

Indonesia Indonesian TVRI Televisi Republik Indonesia

Italy Italian RAI RAI International / Raitalia

Japan Japanese NHK Premium Nippon Hõsõ Kyõkai

Japan English NHK World Nippon Hõsõ Kyõkai

Korea Korean YTN Yonhap Television News

Macedonia Macedonian MRT Makedonska radio-televizija

Malta Maltese PBS Public Broacasting Service of Malta

Netherlands Dutch NOS Nederlandse Omroep Stichting

Pakistan Urdu PTV Pakistan Television Corporation

Philippines Filipino ABS-CBN Alto Broadcasting System - Chronicle Broadcasting Network

Poland Polish Polsat Telewizja Polsat S.A.

Portugal Portuguese RTP Rádio e Televisão de Portugal, S.A.

Qatar English ALJ Al Jazeera Satellite Network

Russia Russian NTV Телекомпания HTB

Russia English RT Russia Today

Serbia Serbian RTS Radio-televizija Srbije

Spain Spanish RTVE Radiotelevisión Española

Turkey Turkish TRT Türkiye Radyo Televizyon Kurumu

UAE Arabic DTV Dubai Television

USA English PBS Public Broadcasting Service

A App pe pend d dix ix 9 9 Wo Worl rld dW Wat at a ch ch: L La L ng ngu ua age es s b broa a adc cas st t an nd d s sou ur urce e b bro road dc ca ast s ers (c ( on onti tin nued ed d)

152 SBS Annual Report 2014

SBS ONE

Afar Afrikaans Aja Albanian Amharic Arabic Arabic (Algerian) Arabic (Chadian) Arabic (Moroccan) Aramaic Armenian Arrernte Assamese Auslan Bambara Basque Bemba Bengali Bislama Bosnian

Bulgarian Burmese Cantonese Catalan Corsican Creole (French) Croatian Czech Danish Dari Dinka Dutch Estonian Farsi Fijian Filipino Finnish Flemish Fon French

French Canadian Fulani Gaelic Georgian German Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Indonesian Ingush Inuktitut

(Eastern Canadian) Irish Italian Japanese Jingpho Kalaallisut Kazakh Khmer

Konso Korean Kurdish Kyrgyz Lala-Bisa Lao Latin Lithuanian Lowa Lun Bawang Maasai Malay Mandaean Mandarin Mende Mishmi Mongolian Nama Nepali Newari

Norwegian Nyanja Pashto Pijin Polish Portuguese Punjabi Quechua Romani Romanian Russian Serbian Sesotho Sinhalese Slovak Slovene Somali South American

Indigenous Spanish

Sudanese Susu Swedish Swiss German Tajiki Tamil Thai Tigrinya Turkish Ukranian Urdu Venda Vietnamese Yanomami Yoruba Zulu

A App pe pend d dix ix 10 SB BS S Te T le e evi v si s on n n: La Lan ng gua ag ge es s an an and dii d a al a ec cts ts t s sub b btitlled d e

SBS 2

Afrikaans Albanian Arabic Arabic (Algerian) Arabic (Moroccan) Batanga Bengali Bulgarian Cantonese Catalan Chhattisgarhi

Croatian Czech Danish Dari Dutch Farsi Filipino Finnish Flemish French French Canadian

German Ghomala Greek Guarani Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Italian Japanese

Kayabi Kinyarwanda Korean Korubo Kurdish Maasai Mandarin Marathi North American

Indigenous Norwegian

Pashto Polish Portuguese Punjabi Romanian Russian Serbian Setswana Shipibo Spanish Swedish

Taiwanese Thai Tsotsitaal Turkish Urdu Vietnamese Wolof Xhosa Yiddish Zulu

NITV

Afrikaans Arabic Arrernte Cree Danish Djinba Dutch Dyirbal French

Gaelic German Gumatj Indonesian Inuktitut Inuktitut

(Eastern Canadian) Irish Kala Lagaw Ya

Kalaallisut Kalaw Kawaw Ya Kriol Lakota Maori Martu Wangka Masai Navaho Navajo

Ngarluma North American Indigenous Norwegian Nunggubuyu Pidgin Pitjantjatjara Quechua Russian

Sami Samoan Sepedi Spanish Swahili Swedish Taiwanese Tok Pisin Warlpiri

Worrorra Yolgnu Matha

ONLINE1

Arabic Cantonese

Chinese French

Italian Japanese

Mandarin Spanish

Vietnamese

1 Online only content. Subtitled content broadcasts on SBS ONE, SBS 2 and NITV is also available on SBS ON DEMAND.

153

Audience share1

SBS Total People 16+ Metro Free-to-Air Share

Financial Year Share Major Events

2009/10 6.5% Ashes/World Cup 2010

2010/11 5.9% World Cup 2010

2011/12 5.9%

2012/13 6.0%

2013/14 5.7% World Cup 2014

Source: OzTAM; 5 City Metro; Network SBS TTL (SBS ONE + SBS 2 + NITV); 1-Jul-2009 to 30-Jun-2014, People 16+ (including guests); Share of Metro FTA %, Sun-Sat 18:00-23:59; Consolidated (Live + As Live + Time Shifted).

SBS Total Individuals Metro Free-to-Air Share

Financial Year Share Major Events

2009/10 6.2% Ashes/World Cup 2010

2010/11 5.6% World Cup 2010

2011/12 5.6%

2012/13 5.6%

2013/14 5.4% World Cup 2014

Source: OzTAM; 5 City Metro; Network SBS TTL (SBS ONE + SBS 2 + NITV); 1-Jul-2009 to 30-Jun-2013, Total Individuals (including guests); Share of Metro FTA %, Sun-Sat 18:00-23:59; Consolidated (Live + As Live + Time Shifted).

Audience reach

SBS Total Individuals Metro and Regional Average Weekly Cumulative Reach1

Financial Year

5 Capital Cities 000’s Aggregated Regional 2 000’s

2009/10 5,410 2,553

2010/11 5,400 2,425

2011/12 5,279 2,334

2012/13 5,061 2,287

2013/14 5,123 2,288

Source: OzTAM 5 City Metro and RegTAM Aggregated Regional Markets; Network SBS TTL (SBS ONE + SBS 2 + NITV); 1-Jul-2009 to 30-Jun-2014. Total Individuals (including guests); Average Weekly Cumulative Reach (5 mins Consecutive). Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59; Consolidated (Live + As Live + Time Shifted);

1 SBS ONE, SBS 2 (from June 2009) and NITV (from December 2012). 2 Western Australia included from 2012.

A Appe pe p nd dix ix 11 SB BS S Te T le e evi v si s on n n: A Aud di dien nc ce c s sha a are, re e eac a h h an n a d d d dem mo og gr g ap phi h c cs

SBS Total People Average Weekly Cumulative Reach By Market1

2009-10 000’s

2010-11 000’s

2011-12 000’s

2012-13 000’s

2013-14 000’s

5 Capital Cities

Sydney 1,603 1,533 1,540 1,464 1,562

Melbourne 1,612 1,686 1,648 1,623 1,592

Brisbane 1,009 972 937 883 893

Adelaide 539 534 506 495 486

Perth 647 675 649 596 590

5 City Metro Total 5,410 5,400 5,279 5,061 5,123

Aggregated Regional Areas

Queensland 630 519 470 476 473

Northern NSW 744 516 511 531 528

Southern NSW 508 548 522 485 494

Victoria 458 466 450 428 432

Western Australia n/a n/a 190 176 164

Tasmania 213 201 191 192 197

Aggregated Regional Total 2,553 2,425 2,334 2,287 2,288

Source: OzTAM 5 City Metro and RegTAM Aggregated Regional Markets: Network SBS TTL (SBS ONE + SBS 2 + NITV); 29-Jun-2009 to 30-Jun-2014. Total Individuals (including guests), Average Weekly Cumulative Reach (5 mins Consecutive); Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59, Consolidated (Live + As Live + Time Shifted).

1 SBS ONE, SBS 2 (from June 2009) and NITV (from December 2012). 2 Western Australia included from 2012.

154 SBS Annual Report 2014

SBS Total People Average Weekly Cumulative Reach By Demographic1

2009-10 000’s

2010-11 000’s

2011-12 000’s

2012-13 000’s

2013-14 000’s

5 Capital Cities

Total Individuals 5,410 5,400 5,279 5,061 5,123

People 0-17 600 573 549 507 555

Men 18-39 880 841 731 646 666

Men 40-54 738 735 740 703 697

Men 55+ 954 961 1,000 973 992

Men 18+ 2,572 2,537 2,470 2,321 2,354

Women 18-39 710 720 665 632 623

Women 40-54 619 609 598 596 613

Women 55+ 910 962 997 1,006 979

Women 18+ 2,239 2,290 2,260 2,233 2,215

Aggregated Regional2

Total Individuals 2,553 2,425 2,334 2,287 2,288

People 0-17 293 286 242 234 228

Men 18-39 320 292 262 243 236

Men 40-54 341 324 305 307 307

Men 55+ 505 485 504 502 513

Men 18+ 1,165 1,100 1,070 1,052 1,056

Women 18-39 287 263 251 233 228

Women 40-54 295 288 279 276 270

Women 55+ 515 488 491 493 506

Women 18+ 1,096 1,039 1,022 1,002 1,004

Source: OzTAM 5 City Metro and RegTAM Aggregated Regional Markets (inc WA); SBS TTL (SBS ONE, SBS 2 + NITV); 29 Jun 2009 to 30 June 2014; Total Individuals (including guests); Average Weekly Cume Reach (5 mins Consecutive). Sun-Sat 02:00-25:59.Consolidated (Live + As Live + Time Shifted).

1 SBS ONE, SBS 2 (from June 2009) and NITV (from December 2012). 2 Western Australia included from 2012.

Viewing by ethnicity

Calendar Years 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

5 Capital Cities

Born overseas in a non-English speaking country 50% 47% 47% 45% 42% 41%

Born in Australia or in an overseas English speaking country 37% 36% 33% 32% 29% 27%

Total people 38% 37% 35% 33% 30% 29%

Aggregated Regional

Born overseas in a non-English speaking country 59% 54% 52% 53% 50% 47%

Born in Australia or in an overseas English speaking country 39% 38% 35% 34% 32% 29%

Total people 40% 39% 36% 35% 32% 30%

Source: OzTAM: 5 City Metro and RegTAM: Regional Aggregated Markets (inc WA): SBS TTL (SBS ONE, SBS 2 + NITV), 30-Dec-2007 to 31-Dec-2013; Total Individuals (including guests). Born Overseas in LOTE Country (Sum Of Weights), Born in Australia or in English Speaking Country (Sum Of Weights).

155

A Appe pe p nd dix ix 1 12 SB BS S Di D gi giita a t ll Te e ele l vi visiio on o s se erv vice e es: A Are re eas s ser rved d d1

Area Served Channel

Australian Capital Territory

Canberra 30

Conder* 35

Tuggeranong 57

Weston Creek/ Woden 57

New South Wales

Adelong 34

Albury North 29

Anna Bay* 49

Armidale 34

Armidale North* 61

Ashford 65

Batemans Bay/ Moruya 40

Bathurst 9

Batlow* 40

Bega 32

Belmont North* 31

Bermagui* 40

Boambee/Sawtell* 50

Bombala 46

Bouddi 34

Bourke Town 46

Bowral/Mittagong 49

Braidwood 53

Brewarrina 45

Broken Hill 12

Bungendore* 46

Byron Bay* 41

Central Tablelands 42

Central Western Slopes 44

Cobar 11

Coffs Harbour 41

Coffs Harbour North* 52

Condobolin 55

Coolah 52

Cooma Town 67

Cooma/Monaro 28

Cootamundra* 56

Cowra 59

Dalmeny* 53

Deniliquin 50

Dubbo 55

Dungog 61

Eastgrove* 28

Eden 68

Area Served Channel

Elizabeth Beach* 60

Eugowra* 67

Forster* 40

Glen Innes 65

Gloucester 31

Gosford 34

Goulburn 59

Grafton/Kempsey 39

Grenfell* 53

Gundagai* 49

Gunning* 67

Harden* 55

Hay 40

Hillston* 40

Holbrook (Holbrook Motor Village)† 28

Illawarra 54

Inverell 65

Jerilderie 60

Jindabyne 53

Junee* 34

Kandos† 57

Kings Cross 32

Kotara 38

Laurieton 57

Lightning Ridge 51

Lithgow 28

Lithgow East 67

Maclean/Ashby* 46

Manly/Mosman 32

Manning River 9A

Merewether 38

Merimbula* 39

Merriwa 41

Mount Kembla* 50

Mudgee 67

Mudgee Town* 51

Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area 33

Murrurundi 34

Narooma 53

Narrandera* 34

Newcastle 38

North Haven (Beachfront CP)† 30

Nowra North 63

Oberon* 54

Ocean Shores 46

Area Served Channel

Peak Hill* 51

Picton** 32

Port Stephens 31

Portland/ Wallerawang 67

Richmond/Tweed 40

Smiths Lake* 40

Stanwell Park 49

Stroud* 60

SW Slopes/E Riverina 48

Sydney 7

Sydney North West** 32

Sydney South West** 40

Talbingo 40

Tamworth 51

Tenterfi eld 55

Thredbo 30

Tumbarumba* 40

Tumut 56

Ulladulla 31

Upper Hunter 64

Upper Namoi 36

Uralla* 46

Vacy 30

Wagga Wagga 54

Walgett 42

Walwa/Jingellic* 59

Warialda* 64

Warners Bay* 31

Wellington* 51

West Wyalong* 56

Wilcannia 34

Wollongong 44

Woolgoolga* 51

Woronora** 40

Wyong 38

Young 57

Northern Territory

Alice Springs 6

Batchelor 40

Bayu-Undan† 40

Darwin 29

Darwin City 40

Jabiru 28

Katherine 6

Nhulunbuy 6

Tennant Creek 11

Area Served Channel

Tindal* 48

Yulara† 47

Queensland

Agnes Water* 66

Airlie Beach 34

Airlie Cove (Resort and Van Park)* 29

Alpha† 46

Anakie† 40

Aramac† 47

Atherton 55

Augathella† 46

Ayr 56

Babinda 52

Bancroft† 33

Barcaldine 44

Bedourie† 46

Bell 52

Birdsville† 46

Blackall 34

Blackwater 42

Boonah 40

Bowen Town 34

Boyne Island 53

Boyne Island 53

Brisbane 7

Brisbane North West** 69

Brisbane South East** 33

Burketown† 46

Cairns 29

Cairns East 52

Cairns North 52

Canungra** 33

Capella 28

Carmila† 46

Charleville 12

Charters Towers 51

Chillagoe† 46

Clairview† 40

Clermont 57

Cloncurry 34

Collinsville 53

Cooktown 34

Cooloola Cove* 57

Cow Bay† 46

156 SBS Annual Report 2014

Area Served Channel

Crows Nest* 56

Cunnamulla 34

Currumbin 36

Daintree Village† 40

Darling Downs 49

Dimbulah 40

Dysart 61

Eidsvold† 53

Emerald 57

Emu Park (Bell Caravan Park)† 46

Eromanga† 46

Esk 51

Flametree/Jubilee Pocket* 66

Gladstone East 30

Gladstone West 46

Gold Coast 36

Gold Coast Southern Hinterland 36

Goldsborough Valley* 35

Goondiwindi 60

Gordonvale 52

Gympie 40

Gympie Town 50

Herberton 55

Hervey Bay 53

Hughenden 34

Jericho† 47

Jundah† 47

Karumba† 46

Kooralbyn** 33

Longreach 11

Mackay 29

Mareeba 52

Maroon† 46

Middlemount 49

Mission Beach 50

Mitchell 37

Monto 50

Moonford† 46

Moranbah 50

Moranbah Town 66

Morven† 47

Mossman 38

Mossman South† 56

Mount Alford** 67

Mount Isa 9A

Area Served Channel

Mount Morgan* 68

Moura* 46

Mudjimba (Mudjimba Beach HP)* 35

Mundubbera* 57

Murwillumbah 40

Muttaburra† 46

Nambour 40

Nanango* 68

Nebo 66

Noosa/Tewantin 40

Noosaville (Noosa River HP)† 35

Normanton† 47

Peregian Beach* 33

Point Arkwright* 33

Port Douglas 66

Proserpine 55

Quilpie† 46

Rainbow Beach* 57

Rathdowney** 33

Ravenshoe 52

Redlynch 58

Rockhampton 37

Rockhampton East 54

Roma 9A

Sapphire/Rubyvale† 46

Sarina Beaches* 45

Shute Harbour 53

Southern Downs 48

Speewah† 58

Springsure 54

St George 10

St Lawrence† 40

Stonehenge† 46

Stuart 51

Sunshine Coast North 50

Sunshine Coast South 35

Tambo† 34

Texas 60

Thursday Island 34

Tieri 57

Tin Can Bay* 57

Toowoomba 67

Toowoomba East* 67

Toowoomba South* 67

Area Served Channel

Townsville 37

Townsville North 51

Tully 50

Warwick 53

Weipa 34

Wide Bay 28

Willows† 46

Windorah† 46

Winton 34

Wonga Beach* 68

Yarraman* 67

Yeppoon 54

South Australia

Adelaide 7

Adelaide Foothills 34

Angaston** 55

Bordertown 41

Burra 34

Cape Jervis** 41

Caralue Bluff 57

Carrickalinga** 50

Ceduna/Smoky Bay 40

Clare 46

Coffi n Bay 45

Coober Pedy 34

Cowell 61

Craigmore/Hillbank 34

Eudunda** 69

Gumeracha** 50

Kingston SE/Robe 35

Lameroo 41

Lyndoch** 53

Maitland** 50

Mannum** 41

Morgan* 41

Myponga** 41

Naracoorte 41

Normanville** 39

Orroroo* 47

Pinnaroo 35

Port Lincoln 53

Quorn† 46

Renmark/Loxton 40

Roxby Downs 34

South East 28

Spencer Gulf North 41

Strathalbyn** 41

Area Served Channel

Swan Reach** 69

Tumby Bay 43

Victor Harbor 34

Waikerie 46

Woomera†† 35

Yankalilla** 41

Tasmania

Acton Road 35

Barrington Valley 31

Bicheno 35

Binalong Bay 38

Burnie 66

Currie† 34

Cygnet 41

Derby (Tas) 46

Dover 55

Dover South 40

East Devonport 39

Forth* 44

Geeveston 55

Hillwood 46

Hobart 9A

Hobart NE Suburbs 64

King Island 51

Launceston 34

Lileah 9A

Lilydale 46

Maydena 43

Meander 47

NE Tasmania 44

Neika/Leslie Vale* 46

New Norfolk 34

Orford 40

Penguin 60

Queenstown/Zeehan 46

Rosebery 28

Smithton 37

St Helens 28

St Marys 51

Strahan† 40

Swansea 46

Taroona 42

Ulverstone 39

Waratah 39

Wynyard 29

157

Area Served Channel

Victoria

Alexandra 67

Alexandra Environs 42

Anglesea/Aireys Inlet** 28

Apollo Bay* 69

Bairnsdale 52

Ballarat 43

Ballarat East* 55

Bendigo 28

Birchip* 69

Bonnie Doon 29

Boolarra* 51

Bright 28

Broadford† 46

Bruthen 46

Cann River 46

Charlton* 69

Churchill 51

Cobden 68

Cohuna* 59

Colac 49

Corryong 35

Eildon 37

Eildon Town 42

Falls Creek† 40

Ferntree Gully 50

Foster 59

Geelong** 53

Genoa 35

Goulburn Valley 36

Harrietville† 46

Healesville** 34

Hopetoun 31

Horsham 49

Howqua* 28

Inverloch* 59

Jeeralang/Yinnar South* 51

Kiewa 40

Koondrook/Barham* 69

Lakes Entrance 58

Latrobe Valley 30

Learmonth† 57

Lorne* 69

Mansfi eld 67

Marysville 34

Melbourne 7

Area Served Channel

Melbourne Inner Suburbs** 57

Mildura/Sunraysia 28

Mitta Mitta† 46

Monbulk** 53

Mt Cowley IBL* 69

Murray Valley 59

Myrtleford 58

Newborough* 40

Nhill 67

Ouyen* 51

Portland 68

Robinvale* 51

Rosebud 57

Safety Beach 57

Selby 50

Seymour 66

South Yarra 57

Tanybryn IBL* 69

Tawonga South† 28

Terang* 43

Timboon* 66

Trafalgar/Yarragon* 40

Underbool* 69

Upper Murray 7

Upwey 50

Warburton 34

Warracknabeal* 67

Warrnambool 53

Warrnambool City 68

Waubra† 57

Western Victoria 7

Wycheproof* 69

Wye River** 34

Yea 37

Western Australia

Albany 41

Augusta 47

Blackstone† 46

Bridgetown 43

Broome 9A

Bruce Rock 48

Bunbury 34

Carnamah 47

Carnarvon 11

Central Agricultural 43

Cervantes† 48

Area Served Channel

Cocos Islands Home Island†† 42

Coolgardie† 40

Dampier 30

Denham† 34

Derby 7

Esperance 9

Exmouth 9

Fitzroy Crossing 40

Geraldton 42

Halls Creek 9A

Jurien† 38

Kalbarri 10

Kalgoorlie 7

Kambalda 41

Karratha 65

Katanning 44

Kojonup 48

Koorda† 46

Kununurra 10

Kununurra East 41

Lancelin** 40

Laverton† 46

Leonora† 41

Mandurah/Waroona 40

Manjimup 55

Margaret River 43

Meekatharra 9A

Menzies† 41

Merredin 48

Mingenew 47

Moora 39

Morawa 33

Mount Magnet 9A

Mullewa 47

Nannup 28

Narrogin 55

Newman 11

Ningaloo Lighthouse Resort† 48

Norseman 47

Northam 54

Northampton 47

Pannawonica 10

Paraburdoo 12

Pemberton 28

Perth 7

Perth City** 50

Area Served Channel

Perth Coastal** 50

Port Hedland 6

Roebourne 8

Roleystone 40

Southern Agricultural 29

Southern Cross Town 28

Tom Price 11

Toodyay 46

Two Rocks** 28

Wagin 28

Warburton † 46

Wongan Hills† 46

Wyndham 11

External Territories

Christmas Island Drumsite†† 7

Christmas Island Phosphate Hill†† 35

Christmas Island Rocky Point†† 41

Cocos Islands†† 7

* Regional Broadcast Australia (RBA) owned transmission site ** TX Australia (TXA) owned transmission site † self-help retransmission site †† Government owned

retransmission site

1 Channels as at 30 June 2014. SBS’s analogue services ceased at the end of 2013 when the Government’s digital switchover was completed.

Source Retransmission data is sourced from the ACMA database of Broadcast Transmitter Licences.

A Appe pe p nd dix ix 1 12 SB BS S Di D gi giita a t ll Te e ele l vi visiio on o s se erv vice e es: A Are re eas s ser rved d d1 ((co o c nt n in nu ued) d

158 SBS Annual Report 2014

Ap App pe end dix ix 1 13 SB BS S An A a al alog g o ue e e Ra adio o i se er rvi vices s s: A Are ea as s se erv ved d d

Area Served Channel

Australian Capital Territory

Canberra 105.5*

Canberra 105.5

New South Wales

Balranald† 96.3

Bathurst† 88.9

Batlow† 92.5

Boggabilla† 107.9

Boorowa† 107.3

Brewarrina† 89.7

Broken Hill† 98.1

Cobar† 105.3

Coolamon† 103.1

Cooma (town)† 106.5

Coonabarabran† 92.5

Coonamble† 90.3

Cootamundra† 102.9

Corowa† 90.9

Cowra† 95.9

Culcairn† 91.1

Deniliquin† 107.3

Dubbo (City)† 100.5

Gilgandra† 103.7

Glen Innes† 89.1

Griffi th† 92.7

Gulargambone† 93.9

Gulgong† 104.7

Gundagai† 95.1

Gunnedah Town† 103.9

Holbrook† 93.7

Ivanhoe† 102.9

Jerilderie† 91.7

Junee† 98.7

Lightning Ridge† 94.5

Lismore† 98.9

Lithgow† 106.3

Long Flat† 107.9

Menindee† 105.7

Merriwa† 104.3

Moama† 99.7

Mudgee Town† 89.9

Mungindi† 102.3

Murrin Bridge† 104.7

Murrurundi† 100.1

Muswellbrook† 107.7

Narrabri† 92.1

Narrandera† 93.5

Narromine† 101.5

Area Served Channel

Nimbin† 106.3

Nyngan† 103.9

Oberon† 107.1

Orange† 100.5

Parkes† 101.3

Peak Hill† 100.9

Port Macquarie† 107.7

Quirindi† 96.3

Sydney* 97.7

Sydney 97.7

Tumbarumba† 100.5

Tumut† 94.7

Walcha† 107.7

Walgett† 98.7

White Cliffs† 105.1

Wilcannia† 106.3

Wyalong† 96.1

Young† 98.7

Northern Territory

Darwin 100.9

Nhulunbuy† 99.7

Queensland

Airlie Beach† 89.1

Alpha† 102.3

Aramac† 99.7

Ayr† 96.1

Badu Island† 96.9

Bedourie† 102.9

Birdsville† 104.5

Blackall† 103.1

Bollon† 96.3

Boonah† 91.1

Boulia† 101.3

Brisbane 93.3

Cairns (Mt Yarrabah)† 90.5

Canungra† 104.9

Carmila† 89.7

Charleville† 98.5

Clairview† 90.1

Clermont† 103.7

Cloncurry† 106.1

Cow Bay† 99.1

Cunnamulla† 104.5

Daintree† 90.5

Dajarra† 96.5

Dingo Beach† 94.5

Dirranbandi† 95.3

Eidsvold† 104.3

Area Served Channel

Emerald† 93.1

Eromanga† 89.3

Eulo† 104.9

Glenden† 94.1

Hughenden† 104.3

Hungerford† 104.5

Injune† 102.7

Jericho† 101.7

Kooralbyn† 104.9

Longreach† 101.3

Meandarra† 97.9

Monto† 107.3

Moonford† 90.7

Moranbah† 92.9

Mossman† 95.1

Murray Island Group† 97.7

Muttaburra† 100.5

Nebo† 94.7

Newcastle* 94.7

Port Douglas† 105.5

Proserpine† 90.3

Quilpie† 98.1

Rathdowney† 104.1

Richmond† 106.1

Sapphire† 103.5

Shute Harbour† 106.9

Speewah† 94.3

Springsure† 99.3

St Lawrence† 97.3

Tambo† 103.5

Tara† 90.3

Taroom† 97.3

Thallon† 92.5

Thargomindah† 102.9

Theodore† 102.7

Willows† 99.7

Winton† 103.1

Wondai† 98.9

Wyandra† 92.3

Yowah† 102.5

South Australia

Adelaide 106.3

Adelaide Foothills 95.1

Coober Pedy† 93.3

Maluku Kuru† 106.5

Naracoorte† 88.7

Renmark† 99.1

Roxby Downs† 92.3

Area Served Channel

Woomera† 104.9

Wudinna† 100.5

Tasmania

Hobart 105.7

Queenstown† 93.7

Rosebery† 91.1

Strahan† 94.7

Victoria

Ballarat (Warrenheip)† 95.9

Bendigo (City)† 95.7

Hamilton† 100.5

Maryborough (Vic)† 104.5

Melbourne* 93.1

Melbourne 93.1

Mildura† 98.7

Morwell† 90.9

Myrtleford† 97.3

Wodonga† 89.5

Wollongong* 89.5

Western Australia

Bridgetown† 97.3

Broome† 91.7

Coorow† 107.1

Denmark† 106.9

Exmouth† 98.9

Green Head† 100.1

Hopetoun (WA)† 95.7

Merredin† 102.7

Moora† 103.5

Morawa† 93.5

Newman Mining Area C† 103.3

Perth 96.9

Pingelly† 93.9

Ravensthorpe† 94.7

Wandering† 93.7

Westonia† 101.9

Wongan Hills† 106.3

* AM Service † self-help retransmission

1 Channels as at 30 June 2014.

Source Retransmission data is sourced from the ACMA database of Broadcast Transmitter Licences.

159

Ap App pe end dix ix 1 14 SB BS S Di D gi gittall Ra a adio o se se ervic c ices s: A A Area as s se s rv ve ed d

Sydney

Melbourne

Adelaide

Brisbane

Perth

Canberra (trial)

160 SBS Annual Report 2014

Ap App pe end dix ix 1 15 SB BS S Te T le evi v s sion n n: A Adv ve ertis s iser r e s s

SBS ONE and SBS 2

20th Century Fox 99bikes AAMI AB Foods Actron Air Adelaide Central Market Adelaide Fringe Festival Adidas Advanced Hair Studio Age, The AKA Alby Turner & Son Kitchens ALDI Alinta Energy Alzheimer’s Australia Amber Tiles Ambition Entertainment American Express AMP Ancestry.com Andrew Jones Travel Animals Australia ANZ Bank APG Apple Apple Computer APT Touring ArborCrest Arla Foods Arnotts Arrow Energy Art Gallery of Western Australia Ashley & Martin Asia Travel Communications Asics ASPIA AstraZeneca ATA Audi Aurora Energy Austral Piano World Australian Cancer

Research Foundation Australian Football League Australian Greens, The Australian Health Management Australian Labor Party Australian Meat &

Livestock Corporation Australian Pensioners Insurance Australian

Philharmonic Orchestra Australian Piano Fair Australian Scholarship Group Australian Solar Council Aztec

International Entertainment Babylove Bamboozle

Bank of Queensland Bankmecu Barry Paterson Media Bayer Australia Beaumont Tiles (Adelaide) Beaumont Tiles (Brisbane) Beaumont Tiles (Melbourne) Beaumont Tiles (NSW) Beaumont Tiles (QLD) Beaumont Tiles (SA) Beaumont Tiles (Sydney) Beaumont Tiles (Tasmania) Beaumont Tiles (VIC) Belgamba Eco Tourism Retreat Bellissimo Services Bendigo Bank Bet365 Betfair Bevilles Jewellers Beyond Blue Bicycle Express Bike Exchange Bing Lee Bingle Birch Carroll and Coyle Limited Bishops Solicitors Black Knight Erotica Blue Star Electric Bluesfest Touring BMW Australia Bob Brown Foundation, The Bob Jane Boehringer Bond University Borg Brothers Funerals Boystown Breville Britz N Pieces Broadway Homes Brookland Valley Brown Forman Brutale Restaurant BT Financial Buderim Ginger Retail Budget Direct Bulla Bunnings Warehouse Bupa Australia Health Calypso Mangoes Camera House Cancer Council WA Cappo Seafood Capricorn Motors Captain Choice Tours Caravan & Camping Industries

Association of SA Caravan Trade Industry Association Victoria Care Super

Carlton United Breweries Carpet Choice Cartell Music CauseForce CGU Chemist Warehouse Chevron Chisholm Institute of TAFE Choosi Chris O’Brien Lifehouse Christadelphian Gospel

Proclamation Association Chrysler Chugg Entertainment Citibank Citroen City Perth Legal Clarke Security Clive Palmer United

Australia Party Clubs NSW CMI Coles Express Coles Financial Services Coles Gift Cards Coles Insurance Coles Orion Coles Supermarkets Collins Food Group Colonial First State Commonwealth Bank Conci Furniture Continence Foundation

of Australia CPA Australia Crazy Domains Crown Crown Perth CUA Curtin University Customer Owned

Banking Association Dainty Consolidated Entertainment Dave Potter Honda Dealmax Defence Bank Delphi Bank Demir Leather Destination NSW Diageo District Aborigines Co-Op Diversifi ed Exhibitions Dr Oetker Dreamland Duo Glass Dyson Appliances Ebay Eftpos eHarmony

Ekornes Elite Appliances Eltham Valley Pantry Empire Touring Energex English For Work Enjo Ergon Energy Essential Ingredient Etihad Airways Ettason Euro Solar Eventscorp Evergreen Cactus Australia Expedia Express Solar Ezyline Events Falun Dafa Association of

Australia (Vic) Inc Falun Dafa Association of NSW Inc Falun Dafa Association of

QLD Inc Falun Dafa Association of VIC Inc Fantastic Furniture Fasham Johnson Federal - Australia Post Federal - Australian

Electoral Commission Federal - Australian Taxation Offi ce Federal - DBCDE Federal - DEEWR Federal - Dept

of Communications Federal - Dept of Defence Federal - Dept of Foreign

Affairs & Trade Federal - Dept of Health & Aged Care Federal - Dept of Immigration

& Citizenship Federal - Dept of Justice & Attorney General Federal - DIICSRTE Federal - FaHCSIA Federal - National Preventative

Health Agency First National Real Estate Borg & Associates FKP Properties Flight Centre Flutes Fonterra Ford Ford Dealers Forest & Wood

Products Australia Foxtel Fred Hollows Foundation

161

Ap App pe end dix ix 1 15 SB BS S Te T le e evi v s sion n n: A Adv ve verttis s iser rs (c (c (con ntin nu nued d))

Fridge & Washer City Friedman Lurie Singh & D’Angelo Frontier Touring Company, The Garvan Institute Gavin Ross & Co GE General Mills General Store Get Up Gift Abroad QLD GlaxoSmithKline GMF Health Gold Coast International

Marine Expo Golden Casket Goldfi elds Cyclassic Good Guys, The Google Gourmet Gardens Grant Burge Gravia Media GraysOnline Great Southern Railway Greater Building Society Greenpeace Greens WA, The Griffi th University H&R Block Harris Scarfe Harvey Norman HBF Health World Ltd Heart Foundation WA Helen Wong’s Tours Heritage Bank Hi Life Highgrove Bathrooms Hitachi Hi-Tec Oils Holden Holy Spirit Home Timber & Hardware Honda Hopscotch Films Hostplus Hotels Combined Hotels.com Hungry Jacks Huon Aquaculture Group Hyundai IAG Icon Films Iconic, The IGA iGlobe iiNet Ikea ILVE Impressions Furniture InDepth Cases Industry Super Funds

Infi niti ING Direct Innovative Hair Loss Solutions Instant Response Marketing Instant Scratch-Its Institute of Urban

Indigenous Health InsuranceLine Intrepid Travel Invocare Isuzu Mu-X iVoisys J Farren Price Jackwelg Jag Kitchens Jalna Dairy Foods James Cook University Jarvis Ford Jarvis Subaru Jemena Gas Works Jetset Travel Group Jetstar Juicy Isle Jura Just Car Insurance K.M. Smith Kathmandu Kellogg’s Kelly Country Factory Kerala Tourism Kia Motors Australia Kimberly Clark Kincardine Holdings King Furniture Kitchen Craftsmen Kmart Kmart Orion Korean Tourism Kraft Foods La Trobe University Ladbrokes Land Rover Australia Leal Technology Legacy Leimo Lexus Lexus of Adelaide LFB Australia Liberal Party Victoria Lilydale Lindt Lion Lion Nathan Liqui Moly Live Nation Global Liverpool City Council Local Government Association Local Government Association

of QLD L’Oreal Lotterywest Lovehoney

Lucky Lotteries Mannix Air Mars Massel Mastercard Masterfoods Mattel Mazda McDonalds McLernons Meals On Wheels SA Médecins Sans Frontières Medibank Melbourne Hot Rod Show Melbourne Museum Melbourne Rebels Melbourne Star Melbourne

Symphony Orchestra Mentally Healthy WA Mercedes Benz Mercedes Benz Adelaide Mercedes Benz Melbourne Mercy Ships Metcash Metro Tiles Microsoft Miele Australia Millmaine Entertainment Mint Kitchens Mitre 10 Mitsubishi Electric Mitsubishi Motors MLC Mondelez Motorsports NT Mountain Engineering MS Society of SA & NT MSF Mt Buller Murdoch University National Australia Bank National Gallery Victoria Natuzzi Natuzzi Adelaide Nestle New Generation College New Town Toyota Newcastle Permanent News Corporation Nike Nine Live Nissan Nitro Circus No Odd Socks Northern Territory

Tourism Commission NRMA NRMA Motoring & Services NSW Art Gallery of NSW NSW Cancer Institute of NSW NSW Compensation Lawyers

NSW Dept of Health NSW Fire & Rescue NSW NSW Lotteries NSW National

Disability Service NSW Nurses Association NSW Taronga Zoo NSW Transport For NSW NTEU Offi ceworks Offi ceworks Orion Open Training Institute Open Universities Opera Australia Optical Superstore, The Optus Origin Energy P&O Pacifi c Brands Palamino Plastic Products Paramount Pictures Parmalat People’s Choice Credit Union Pepsico Persian Palace Personalised

Plates Queensland Perth Racing Peugeot Pfi tzner Furniture (Nercoba) Pfi zer Pharmacare Pizza Hut Plan Australia Plush Police & Nurses Potato Marketing

Corporation WA Powerball Precious Metals Sydney Pregnancy, Babies &

Child Expo Princess Pictures Procter & Gamble Progressive Direct Insurance Property Wizards Puig Puma Media Punch Media Qantas QBE QLD Dept of Communities QLD Dept of Education

Training Association QLD Dept of Environment & Heritage Protection, National

Parks, Recreation, Sport & Racing QLD Dept of Health QLD Dept of Premier & Cabinet QLD Dept of Treasury & Trade QLD Performing Arts Centre QLD Police

162 SBS Annual Report 2014

QLD Theatre Company QLD Transport QM Properties Qualify Me Queensland Treasury Queensland University

of Technology Quit Tasmania RAA Rabobank RAC (WA) RACQ RACQ Club Membership RACQ Insurance Radio Rentals Rams Home Loans Raw Pearls Real Insurance Rebel Sport Recognition Red Cross Regency Beach Club Regency Real Estate Renault Rentlo Retail Food Group Ride Bellerive Ride To Conquer Cancer Rinnai Rise Up Australia Party Rise Waterfront River 2 Reef Ride Royal Academy of the Arts Rugs A Million Rundle Mall

Management Authority Russell Morris SA Adelaide Festival Centre SA Adelaide Film Festival SA Country Fire Service SA Dept of Premier & Cabinet SA HomeStart Finance SA Lotteries Commission SA Motor

Accident Commission SA Motor Sport Board SA Quality

Home Improvements

SA Safe Work SA State Electoral Offi ce SA Tourism Commission Salvation Army Sydney Salvo Property Samsung San Remo Sanofi Save the Children Scenic Tours Scoot Senior’s Choice, The Sequoia Shannons Insurance Shaver Shop Shell Shock Entertainment Simplot Skoda Smith Family Smiths Snooze Sofa Shop, The Sony Music Sony Picture Releases Sony Playstation Sound Centre Southbank Institute

of Technology Specialty Fashion Group - Millers Specsavers Sportingbet St Vincent de Paul State Opera South

Australia, The Steadfast Stop & Pose Straight Smile Centre Stratco Stuart Alexander StudioCanal Subaru Subway Sun Rice Suncorp Suncorp Direct Life Insurance Sunnybank Community &

Sport Club Sunsuper Super A-Mart Supercell Supercycle SureSafe Swisse Vitamins Sydney Opera House Sydney Symphony Orchestra SydneySide Media Furniture TAB TAB Sportsbet Target Target Orion TAS Dept of Premier & Cabinet Tatts Telstra Thule Australia Titan Sheds TJM Equipped Tobin Brothers TomWaterhouse.com.au Tourism Events QLD Tourism Tasmania Tourism Victoria Toyota TPG Transmission Films TREAC TRG Trivago GmbH TT Line Tuff Trucks Underground Opera, The UNHCR Universal Music University of Adelaide University of Queensland University of

Southern Queensland University of Tasmania VIC Dept of Education & Early

Childhood Development VIC Dept of Health VIC Dept of Human Services VIC Dept of Innovation,

Industry & Regional Development

VIC Dept of Justice VIC Dept of Premier & Cabinet VIC Dept of State Development, Business &

Innovation VIC Dept of Sustainability VIC Dept of Transport VIC Dept of Treasury & Finance Victoria’s Basem*nt Village Roadshow Virgin Money Visa International Vodafone Volkswagen Australia Volvo WA Offi ce of Road Safety WA Tourism Commission WA Water Corporation Walt Disney

Home Entertainment Walt Disney Motion Pictures Warner Music Warner Village Theme Parks Weber Australia Webjet Western Power Westnet Westpac Wiggle Windsor Smith Womad Woolworths Insurance Woolworths Supermarkets World Property World Vision World Wildlife Fund Wrigley’s WSPA Yakult Yalumba Yamaha Yellow Pages Zinmoto Zuji

NITV

Alzheimer’s Australia Arthur Beetson Foundation Australian Electoral Commission

Black Money Enterprises Bunurong Healthy Lifestyle Team Deakin University East Journey Federal - Dept of Defence Federal - Dept of

Education, Employment & Workplace Relations

Federal - Dept of Families, Housing, Community Services & Indigenous Affairs

Federal - Dept of Health & Aged Care Federal - Dept of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change,

Science, Research & Tertiary Education Federal - Dept of Prime Minister & Cabinet Indigenous Business Australia Melbourne Museum

National Australia Bank National Congress No Smokes NSW Cancer Institute NSW Transport for NSW QLD Dept of Health QLD Dept of Treasury & Trade QLD Performing Arts Centre Recognition Southern Cross University St Teresas College University of Queensland

VIC Dept of Justice VIC Responsible Gambling Foundation

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Program Sponsors: SBS ONE and SBS 2

Program Sponsors

ADbc District Aborigines Co-Op

Adriana Lecouvreur Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Angelic Voices Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Anselm Kiefer: Works and Process Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (Series 4) Massel

Anton Corbijn: Inside Out Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Art of Survival, The (Series 1) NSW Art Gallery of NSW

Art of the Night Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Athletics: IAAF World Championships 2013 Highlights

Asics

Australia with Simon Reeve Great Southern Railway

Bach: A Passionate Life Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Barenboim on Beethoven Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Batteur Du Bolero, Le Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

BB King: The Life of Riley Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Bears of The Last Frontier Subaru

Beauty of Maps, The Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Becoming Traviata Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Better Man Compilation Ancestry.com

Black Book Vic Dept of Treasury and Finance

Bloody Daughter Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Britten: The Final Chapter Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Bronzino: Restoring Genius Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Bureau 06 Defence Bank

Caroline Quentin: A Passage Through India Ancestry.com Subaru

Cendrillon Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Chopin Piano Music: 48 Etudes and Preludes Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Chopper Walt Disney Motion Pictures

Chroma Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

Churchill’s Desert War Compilation Defence Bank

Classical Destinations (Series 3) Scenic Tours

Coast Modern Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Colouring Light: Brian Clarke an Artist Apart Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

Comedy Bang! Bang! Betfair

Concert Schonbrunn 2014 Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Contact Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Cycling Central 2013 QBE

Skoda Swisse Vitamins

Program Sponsors

Cycling Central 2014 Chris O’Brien Lifehouse Skoda

Cycling: Amstel Gold 2014 QBE Skoda

Cycling: Criterium Du Dauphine 2014 Skoda

Cycling: Cycling Australia Events 2013 Subaru

Cycling: Cycling Australia Events 2014 Subaru

Cycling: Fleche-Wallonne 2014 Skoda

Cycling: Giro Di Lombardia 2013 Skoda

Cycling: Giro D’italia 2014 Daily Highlights QBE Skoda

Cycling: Giro D’italia 2014 Live Stages QBE Skoda

Cycling: Jayco Herald Sun Tour 2014 Subaru

Cycling: La Vuelta 2013 Highlights QBE Skoda

Cycling: La Vuelta 2013 Live Stages QBE Skoda

Cycling: Launceston Cycling Classic 2013 District Aborigines Co-Op

Cycling: Liege-Bastogne-Liege 2014 QBE Skoda

Cycling: Milan-San Remo 2014 Skoda

Cycling: Paris-Roubaix 2014 QBE Skoda

Cycling: Paris-Tours 2013 Skoda

Cycling: Subaru National Road Series 2014 Subaru

Cycling: The Spin (Series 2) Subaru

Cycling: Tour Of Beijing 2013 Skoda

Cycling: Tour Of California 2014 Skoda

Cycling: Tour Of Flanders 2014 QBE Skoda

Cycling: UCI MTB World Cup 2014 Subaru

Cycling: UCI Road World Championships 2013 Skoda

Cycling: UCI Track World Championships 2014 Skoda

Cycling: World Ports Classic 2014 Skoda

Dame Aux Camelias, La Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Dance on Screen Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Daphnis and Chloe Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

Deadlys 2013, The Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

164 SBS Annual Report 2014

Program Sponsors

Derren Brown 2012 (Series 1) GraysOnline Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

Derren Brown an Evening of Wonders Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

Derren Brown Enigma Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

Derren Brown: The Experiments

GraysOnline

Destination Flavour - Japan Jetstar

Destination Flavour Gourmet Gardens

Diving Bell and the Butterfl y, The Citroen

Door, The GraysOnline

Doors: Mr Mojo Risin’, The Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Eames: The Architect and the Painter Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Elvis Costello Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Emperor’s Secret Garden, The Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Ethnic Business Awards 2013 National Australia Bank

Eurovision Quiz Contest 2014, The Hostplus Renault

Eurovision Song Contest 2014 Hostplus Renault

Eurovision Song Contest Junior 2013 GraysOnline Ride to Conquer Cancer

Skoda

Everything and Nothing Vic Dept of Treasury and Finance

Expedition Wolf Ancestry.com

Eye Over Prague Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Fairytale Castles of King Ludwig II, The

Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

FIFA World Cup 2006: Two Weeks in June Kia Motors Australia

FIFA World Cup 2014: Best of Fed Dept of Defence Kia Motors Australia

FIFA World Cup 2014: Daily Highlights Fed Dept of Defence Hyundai

Kia Motors Australia Samsung

FIFA World Cup 2014: FIFA Preview and Review Show Fed Dept of Defence Hyundai

Kia Motors Australia Samsung

FIFA World Cup 2014: Match Focus Kia Motors Australia

FIFA World Cup 2014: Match of the Day Highlights Hyundai Kia Motors Australia

FIFA World Cup 2014: Match Replays Fed Dept of Defence Hyundai

Kia Motors Australia Samsung

Program Sponsors

FIFA World Cup 2014: Matches Fed Dept of Defence Hyundai

Kia Motors Australia Samsung

FIFA World Cup 2014: Morning News Hyundai Kia Motors Australia

Samsung

FIFA World Cup 2014: Opening Ceremony Fed Dept of Defence Hyundai

Kia Motors Australia Samsung

FIFA World Cup 2014: Socceroos Show Fed Dept of Defence Hyundai

Kia Motors Australia Samsung

FIFA World Cup 2014: World Cup Show Fed Dept of Defence Kia Motors Australia

Samsung

FIFA World Cup Classic Matches

Fed Dept of Defence Hyundai Kia Motors Australia Samsung

Finance Segment Chevron

Food Factory: Supersized Gourmet Gardens

Food Investigators Massel

Food Lovers’ Guide To Australia Massel

Food Safari Gourmet Gardens

Food Safari (Series 2) Gourmet Gardens

Football 2013-2014: A-League Highlights Show Hyundai IAG

McDonalds NRMA TAB Vic Dept of Treasury and Finance

Football 2013-2014: A-League Live Matches Ashley & Martin Hyundai

IAG McDonalds NRMA TAB TAB Sportsbet Vic Dept of Treasury and Finance

Football 2013-2014: Thursday FC

Hyundai IAG McDonalds NRMA TAB Vic Dept of Treasury and Finance

French Food Safari VIC Dept of Transport

Freud’s Naked Truths Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

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Program Sponsors

Full Brazilian, The Fed Dept of Defence

Hyundai Kia Motors Australia Samsung

G * Wars (Series 1) Ride To Conquer Cancer

Skoda

Gerhard Richter: Painting Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Girl Rising World Vision

Go Back To Where You Came From (Series 2) World Vision

Good Son, The Village Roadshow

Gourmet Farmer (Series 2) Pharmacare

Gourmet Farmer (Series 3) Miele Australia

Grand Tours of Scotland (Series 1-3) Subaru

Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Head-On GraysOnline

Heston’s Fantastical Food Brookland Valley Coles Supermarkets Harvey Norman

Heston’s Feasts (Series 2) Ancestry.com ILVE Simplot Subaru

Hidden Life of Masterpieces - Rembrandt, The Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

History of Ancient Britain: Orkney’s Stone Age Temple Ancestry.com

Hugh Laurie : Copper Bottom Blues Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Hunting and Gathering Citroen

I Bought a Rainforest Vic Dept of Treasury and Finance

I.M. Pei: Building China Modern Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Ice Music: The Sound of the North Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Idris Elba: King of Speed South Australian Tourism Commission

Il Trittico Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

In Search of Haydn Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Iron Chef, The Breville

Italian Food Safari Harvey Norman

Pharmacare

Italy Unpacked Carlton United Breweries

James Rhodes: Piano Man Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Jane Austen: The Unseen Portrait? Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Jean-Michel Basquiat Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Jerome Robbins’ NY Export: Opus Jazz Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Jeselnik Offensive, The Betfair

Program Sponsors

Jess Mauboy’s Road to Eurovision Hostplus Renault

JFK Ancestry.com

Village Roadshow

Jonathan Phang’s Gourmet Express Glaxo Smithkline VIC Dept off Transport

Kathleen Ferrier Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

Katia Kabanova Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Lang Lang: Liszt Now Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Lang Lang: The Art of Being a Virtuoso Melbourne Symphony Orchestra Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

Lantana Walt Disney Motion Pictures

Legally Brown Betfair

Lenny Henry: Finding Shakespeare

Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Lily Cole’s Art Matters Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Looking for Picasso Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Luke Nguyen’s France APT Touring Harvey Norman Volvo

Luke Nguyen’s Greater Mekong Harvey Norman ILVE Simplot Subaru

Luke Nguyen’s Memories of the Mekong APT Touring

Luke Nguyen’s Vietnam (Series 2) Gourmet Gardens

Made in Hollywood Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Madhur Jaffrey’s Curry Nation Simplot

Magical Mystery Tour Documentary

Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

Mahler 9: Lucerne Festival Orchestra Melbourne Symphony Orchestra Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

Make Me … Subaru

Man Who Shot Beautiful Women, The Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Maurizo Pollini: A Musical Profi le Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Mel Brooks: Make a Noise Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Mexican Fiesta with Peter Kuruvita Melbourne Museum Volvo

Microtopia Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Milos Forman Taking Off In America Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Motor Sport: Dakar Rally 2014 Isuzu Mu-X Yamaha

Munch 150 Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Music in the Air Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

My Afternoons with Margueritte Citroen

My Family Feast Gourmet Gardens

166 SBS Annual Report 2014

Program Sponsors

My Father and the Man in Black Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

My Sri Lanka with Peter Kuruvita Gourmet Gardens

Mythbusters (Series 7) Dainty Consolidated Entertainment Hostplus Subaru

Neighbour, The Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

Netball: ANZ Championship 2013 San Remo

Netball: Test Matches 2013 San Remo

New Year’s Day Concert 2013 Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

New York: 20,000 Trees Under the Skyline Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Nina Conti: A Ventriloquist’s Story Melbourne Symphony Orchestra Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

Notre Dame De Paris Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Observer Effect, The Ancestry.com Subaru

Oldboy GraysOnline

One for the Road Citroen

Opera Stories Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

Otello Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Passione: A Musical Adventure Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Patience After Sebald Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Photo Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

Piaf’s Secret Story Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Piano Notes Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Piet Mondrian Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

PopAsia TV 2013 (2 hr) Korean Tourism

PopAsia TV 2013 (30 min/60 min)

Korean Tourism Mt Buller

PopAsia TV 2014 (2 hr) Mercedes Benz Melbourne Mt Buller

Produced by George Martin Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Rabbit Proof Fence Walt Disney Motion Pictures

Real Inglorious Bastards, The Defence Bank

Rectify BMW Australia

Rendez-Vous, Le Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Rise and Fall Of Versailles, The Subaru

Rockwiz (Series 11) Subaru

Rolling Stones: Sweet Summer Sun Hyde Park Live Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Rubinstein by the Rubinsteins Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Russia: A Journey with Jonathan Dimbleby Ancestry.com

Salome Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

San Remo Song Festival 2014 Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Program Sponsors

Scheherazade Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Season at the Juilliard School New York Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Secret History Of Our Streets Ancestry.com

Secret of the Violin, The Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Sensation: The Story of the Who’s Tommy Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Sex, Party and Lies GraysOnline

Shine Walt Disney Motion Pictures

Simon Schama: Shakespeare and Us Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

Speedweek 2013 High Tec Oils

Speedweek 2014 High Tec Oils

Liqui Moly Parmalat

Sphinx Citroen

SPL GraysOnline

Springsteen and I Shock Entertainment

State of the Game: Ange Postecoglou Bet365

Steve Schapiro, An Eye on American Icons Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Strip the City (Series 2) South Australian Tourism Commission

Sutra Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras 2014 Beyond Blue Procter & Gamble

Tadao Ando: From Emptiness to Infi nity Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

To Paint or Make Love Citroen

Too Young to Die Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Toughest Place To Be A ... (Series 2) Subaru

Tour De France 2013 Daily Highlights

Colonial First State QBE Skoda Swisse Vitamins

Tour De France 2013 Daily Updates

Colonial First State QBE Skoda Swisse Vitamins

Tour De France 2013 Extended Highlights

Colonial First State QBE Skoda Swisse Vitamins

Tour De France 2013 Live Stages

Ancestry.com Colonial First State QBE Skoda Swisse Vitamins

Tree of Life, The Vic Dept of Treasury and Finance

Tropfest Australia 2013 Volkswagen Australia

167

Program Sponsors

Tropfest TV 2013 GraysOnline

Turn of the Screw Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Twiggy: The Face of the 60s Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Two Greedy Italians Carlton United Breweries

Two Greedy Italians (Series 2) Carlton United Breweries

Tyson Village Roadshow

UEFA Champions League 2013-2014 Highlights Bet365

UEFA Champions League 2013-2014 Live Matches Bet365

UEFA Champions League 2013-2014 Magazine Bet365

UEFA Europa League 2013-2014 Live Matches Bet365

UEFA Super Cup 2013 Bet365

Ugly Beauty Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Up to the Sky (Series 2) Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Venice 24 / 7 Subaru

Verdi Requiem Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Vikings (Series 2) Dainty Consolidated

Entertainment Volvo

Visual Language of Herbert Matter, The Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Program Sponsors

Walking Dead, The Steadfast

Warhorse: The Real Story Defence Bank

What Is Beauty? Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Who Do You Think You Are? (Series 1) Ancestry.com

Who Do You Think You Are? (Series 5) Ancestry.com

Who Do You Think You Are? (Series 5.2) Ancestry.com

Who Do You Think You Are? (Series 8) Ancestry.com NRMA

Subaru

Who Do You Think You Are? (Series 9) Ancestry.com

William S. Burroughs: A Man Within Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Woman Who Wasn’t There, The Village Roadshow

Woodmans, The Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

World After Stonehenge, The (Series 1) Ancestry.com

World War 2: The Last Heroes (Series1) Defence Bank

World’s Top Paintings with Tim Marlow, The Melbourne Symphony Orchestra Vic Dept of Premier and Cabinet

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Program Sponsors: NITV

Program Sponsors

Festival of Indigenous Rugby League 2014 Department of Prime Minister & Cabinet

Transport for NSW

Koori Knockout 2013 Transport for NSW

The Marngrook Footy Show 2013

Australian Football League (AFL) Beyond Blue Limited

168 SBS Annual Report 2014

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20th Century Fox Abbotts Actegy Health Adap.TV AKA American Express Amy Gillett Foundation Amyson Animals Australia ANZ Bank APT Touring Art Centre Melbourne Art Gallery of NSW Ashley & Martin Austral Piano World Australia Gold &

Silver Exchange Australian Brandenburg Orchestra Australian National University Aztec

International Entertainment Bank of Queensland Bicycle Network Victoria Bicycle Victoria Bing Lee BMW Australia Bosch Brookland Valley Burberry Cadreon Camera House Cancer Council NSW Cancer Council SA Cancer Council WA Care Super Centro Property Management Chemmart Pharmacy Chugg Entertainment Citroen CMC Markets Coles Colonial First State Connoisseur Conquer Cancer CUA Curious Distribution Curtin University Danone Devondale Direct Flights International Dr Oetker Dyson Appliances eBay Eftpos Ekornes Eros Essential Ingredient Federal - Australian

Electoral Commission

Federal - Dept of Education, Employment & Workplace Relations

Federal - Dept of Foreign Affairs & Trade Federal Government Ferrero Australia Ferrero Rocher FetchTV Fisher & Paykel Forestry & Wood

Products Australia Foster Care Foxtel Fred Hollows Foundation GE Corporate Global Multimedia LLC Google Adsense Google Ireland Grant Burge Hachette HBF Heineken Heritage Bank Hesta Hi Gloss Entertainment Holden Hopscotch Films Host Plus Hotels.Com Hyundai IAG Icon Films Infi niti ISF ISN Isuzu Mu-X iVoisys Johnnie Walker JTG Intrepid Kia Motors Australia Kikkoman King Furniture La Trobe University Land Rover Australia Lion Lion Nathan Lite n’ Easy Madman Entertainment Magellan McCain McDonalds Me Bank Medibank Melbourne Museum Melbourne

Symphony Orchestra Menarini Menarini’s Rejuvenail Mercedes Benz

Mercer Mercy Ships Michelin Australia Mitsubishi Electric Momentum Energy MS Society of SA & NT Mt Buller Multicultural Communication

Service NSW Multyfl ex NAPWA Natuzzi Nespresso Nestle Nike Nissan NRMA NSW Multicultural Health

Communication Service NT Tourism Oakley O’Brien Optus Palace Cinemas Palace Entertainment Parramasala Paramount Pictures PennyTel Pfi tzner Furniture (Nercoba) Pinnacle Films Prada Public Transport Victoria Puig Puma Media Qantas QBE Queensland Government Renault Retail Food Group Rise Waterfront Roadshow Films Rubicon SA HomeStart Finance SA State Opera SA Tourism Commission Samsung Scotts Skoda Smartraveller Sony Australia Sony Music Spalding Sun Rice Suncorp Sunnybank Community &

Sport Club Sunsuper Swisse Vitamins Sydney Theatre Company SydneySide Media Furniture

Symingtons TAB Telstra Thai Airways International Thule Australia Tour Down Under Tourism Events QLD Tourism Queensland Tourism WA Transmission Films Travel4fFootball Tube Mogul UNHCR Uni High Universal Music Universal Sony University of Queensland Victorian Government Videology Village Cinemas Vintage Cellars Vitaco Vodafone Volvo WA Opera Walt Disney Motion Pictures Warner Bros Western Union Westpac Wiggle Woolworths Wotif Group Yamaha

169

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5 Star Coffee And Nuts Alevi Community Council of Australia Inc All World Travel Ambassador Coffee American

Superstars Entertainment Amyson Anatolia Cultural Centre Anatolian Arts Arts Centre Melbourne Art Gallery of NSW Asian Aid Organisation Aussia Australia Aussia Pharmaceuticals Austral Piano World Australia DL Corporate Australian Football League Australian Indian

Innovations Inc Australian Labor Party Avesta Migration Services AV Jennings Properties B&B Gowell Bank of Valletta Beijing Tong Ren

Tang Australia Better Value Pharmacy Betty Baltna Grocery Beville Beyond Blue Blue Star Air Conditioning Boris Cherkasski Bravo Events BreastScreen Victoria Brimbank City Council Cancer Council Victoria Cancer Institute NSW Cam Fat Trading Co Centro Property Management Centro Property

Management Victoria Ceylon Exchange Chau Pharmacy Chinmaya Mission City Recital Hall City West Water Concord International Trading Cong Thanh Noodles Cong Thanh Money Transfer Connect TV Continence Foundation

of Australia Cricket Australia Crown Casino Crystal Fountain

Chinese Restaurant Cultural Perspectives Deakin University Destination NSW Diabetes Australia Victoria Digicel Pacifi c Resources Direct Flights International District Aborigines Co-Op Diverse Communications Dragon Home Loans

Duracell Dutch Shop, The DutchCare Energy & Water

Ombudsman NSW Etihad Airways Excellent Coaches Fed - Australian Tax Offi ce Fed - Australian

Electoral Commission Fed - Australian Securities Investment Commission Fed - Dept of Broadband,

Communications & the Digital Economy Fed - Dept of Defence Fed - Dept of Education, Employment & Workplace Relations Fed - Dept of Families, Housing, Community Services & Indigenous Affairs Fed - Dept of Foreign Affairs & Trade Fed - Dept of Health & Aged Care Fed - Dept of Immigration & Citizenship Fed - Dept of Industry, Innovation & Climate Change Federal Election Candidate - Andrew Nguyen Federal Election Candidate - Chris Bowen Federal Election Candidate - Jason Clare MP Financial Ombudsman Service First National Real Estate Borg & Associates First One Australia Freedom Hearing Gadallah & Co Galaxy Entertainers Pty Ltd Galaxy Import & Export Co Gallop Import & Export Gift Abroad QLD Global Ensemble Grand Pearl Chinese Seafood Restaurant Green Engineering Grosvenor Private Wealth Harvey Norman Healthdirect Australia Hoa Hung Tofu Hoa Mai Association in Australia Incorporated Hoa Thuan Pty Ltd Home Plus Finance Home789 Hua Kien-Fat Trading Human Appeal International Icontact Optometrist Illawarra Shoalhaven LHD Indofood Instant Scratchies Ironfi sh iVoisys Ivy Real Estate

Japanese Welfare Association of Victoria Jasmine Lodge Kaah Money Transfer Korean Tourism Lalisse Lebara Lee Pharmacy Life Saving Live Nation Global Liverpool Night Market Lucky Asian Master Creations

Denture Clinic Masterton Homes Mercy Ships MN Compensation Lawyers Mobile Link MoneyGram MTC Australia Myer National Disability Services Navitas Professional Nestle Nhan International Export &

Import Novosti Australia NRMA NSW Department of Health NSW Environmental

Protection Authority NSW Multicultural Health Communication Service NSW Rural Fire Service NSW Transport for NSW NSW Transport Roads &

Maritime Services NSW Trustee & Guardian Oasis Griffi ths Coffee Oceanlink Transport Services OKNetTV Orbis Express Oriental Merchant Oz2China Palliative Care Australia Parker Brent ParkTrent Parmalat Parramasala Pendle Hill Travel Perisher Peter Warren Automotive Peter Warren Peugeot Pho House Pinnacle Health Clinic Q&N Qantas Quang Duc

Buddhist Monastery Queenie Group Home Loans Ravenswick Antiques Rebel Sport Regency Real Estate Rinnai Rockman (Australia) Royal Melbourne Show

Sanford Legal Save & Deliver Pharmacy Liverpool SBS In House Scoot Selective Scholar SGMC International Sheila Baxter Training Centre ShineTown Telecom Singapore Airlines Slavic Baptist Church So Good Trading St George Bank St George Migrant

Resource Centre Studylink International Stunning Beauty & Nails Sydney Opera House Synergy & Taikoz Tattslotto Telstra Thanh Nga Thanh Tung Nguyen Thao Nguyen

Pharmacy Footscray Theng’s Pharmacy TilesLinks Top Tours & Travel TVB Australia United Vietnamese Buddhist

Congregation of Canberra, The UPC College V N International Trading VBN Finance VeeTel VIC Dept of Education & Early Childhood Development VIC Dept of Justice VIC Dept of Premier & Cabinet VIC Dept of State Development, Business & Innovation VIC Dept of Sustainability VIC Dept of Transport, Planning & Local Infrastructure VIC Environment Protection Authority VIC Essential Services Commission VIC Linking Melbourne Authority VIC Responsible Gambling Foundation VicRoads VIC Transport Accident Commission Vietnamese Movie Imperial Marketing Vodafone Western Union Winho Trading Co Woolworths Zoos Victoria

170 SBS Annual Report 2014

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Corporate

Antenna Documentary Film Festival

Australian Ballet

Australian Directors Guild

Australian Writers’ Guild

Bangarra Dance Theatre

Doc Week

M.S. Sydney to the Gong Ride

SBS Youth Orchestra

Screen Producers Association of Australia

Sydney Opera House

Walkley Awards for Excellence in Journalism

SBS Food

Melbourne Food and Wine Festival

SBS Film

French Film Festival

Indian Film Festival

Japanese Film Festival

Openair Cinemas

Spanish Film Festival

SBS Radio

Australian of the Year Awards

Cabramatta Moon Festival

Chand Raat

Chinese New Year 2013 (Sydney)

Chinese New Year 2013 (Hurstville)

Diwali (Melbourne)

Diwali (Sydney)

Haldon Street Festival (Sydney)

India Australia Friendship Fair (Sydney)

Shahrukh Khan

Viva Victoria

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SBS Radio

Date Event Main Language Communities

25 July 2013 German Day Out German

10 August 2013 Chand Raat Eid Festival Punjabi, Hindi, Urdu, Pashto

17 August 2013 Election Exchange - Vietnamese Vietnamese

18 August 2013 Multicultural Eid Festival Arabic, Urdu

24 August 2013 Haldon Street Festival

Election Exchange - Arabic

Arabic

25 August 2013 India Australia Friendship Fair Indian Languages

30 August 2013 Election Exchange - Cantonese Cantonese

10-11 September 2013 Indonesian Festival Indonesian

15 September 2013 Cabramatta Moon Festival Vietnamese

15 September 2013 Brazilian Ritmo Festival Portuguese

21-22 September 2013 Chilean & Latin American Festival Spanish

21 September 2013 Mid-Autumn Moon Festival Cantonese, Mandarin

15 September 2013 Mexican Festival Spanish

28 September 2013 Indonesian Festival Indonesian

17 October 2013 Deepavali @ Martin Place Indian Languages

26 October 2013 Deepavali Festival Indian Languages

27 October 2013 Norton Street Italian Festa Italian

26 October 2013 Diwali Festival of Lights Punjabi, Hindi

27 October 2013 Diwali Fair Punjabi, Hindi

3 November 2013 Egyptian Festival Arabic

16 November 2013 Pacifi c Unity Festival Samoan, Fijian, Indigenous Languages

16 November 2013 West African Festival African, Swahili

17 November 2013 Polish Christmas @ Federation Square Polish

1 December 2013 Polish Christmas Festival Polish

7 December 2013 African Football Tournament Swahili, Somali, Dinka, Other African Languages

17 January 2014 A-League: Melbourne Heart v Newcastle Jets General

18 January 2014 Chinese New Year Festival Mandarin, Cantonese

19 January 2014 Tet Festival Vietnamese

24 January 2014 City of Sydney Chinese New Year Launch Cantonese, Mandarin

172 SBS Annual Report 2014

Date Event Main Language Communities

24 January 2014 Chinese New Year Markets Cantonese, Mandarin

25 January 2014 Lunar New Year Festival Vietnamese

31 January 2014 A-League: Melbourne Heart v Sydney FC General

1 February 2014 Lunar New Year Festival Cantonese, Mandarin, Vietnamese

1 February 2014 Chinese New Year Festival Cantonese, Mandarin

1 February 2014 Slavic Pancake Festival Russian

2 February 2014 Chinese New Year Festival Mandarin, Cantonese

2 February 2014 Tet Festival Vietnamese

2 February 2014 Lunar New Year Twilight Parade Cantonese, Mandarin

7 February 2014 Tet Festival Vietnamese

8 February 2014 Tet Festival Vietnamese

8 February 2014 Antipodes Festival Greek

8 February 2014 Lunar New Year Festival Mandarin, Cantonese

9 February 2014 Greek Glendi Greek

15 February 2014 Chinese New Year Festival Cantonese, Mandarin

21 February 2014 A-League:

Central Coast Mariners v Wellington Phoenix General

22-23 February 2014 Sydney Greek Festival Greek

9 February 2014 Lunar New Year Dragon Boat Races Cantonese, Mandarin

26 February 2014 Asian Cup 2015:

Western Sydney Wanderers v Ulsan Hyundai General

1 March 2014 Anatolian Turkish Festival Turkish

2 March 2014 Russian Festival Russian, Other Balkan Languages

8 March 2014 Moomba General

14 March 2014 A-League: Sydney FC v Brisbane Roar General

14 March 2014 Farsi/Persian Fair Farsi, Persian

15 March 2014 Africultures Festival Amharic, Other African Languages

16 March 2014 Thai Festival Thai, Lao, Hmong

15 March 2014 Ventana Fiesta Festival Spanish

16 March 2014 Antipodes Festival Greek

16 March 2014 Carnival of Cultures General

173

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Date Event Main Language Communities

16 March 2014 Bairro Portuguese Food & Wine Fair Portuguese

17 March 2014 Mandarin Great Debate Mandarin

19 March 2014 Asian Cup 2015:

Western Sydney Wanderers v Kawasaki Frontale General

22 March 2014 Afro Latino Festival Spanish, Portuguese, Amharic, Somali, Swahili

23 March 2014 Passar Turkish Festival Turkish

23 March 2014 Viva Victoria Multicultural Festival General

31 March 2014 Farsi/Persian New Year’s Day Farsi, Persian

11 April 2014 A-League: Newcastle Jets v Adelaide United General

6 April 2014 Swiss Festival German, Swiss

13 April 2014 Chithirai Thirunaal (Tamil New Year) Tamil

26 April 2014 Boishakhi Mela (Bengali New Year) Bangla

17 May 2014 Korean Festival Korean

31 May 2014 Streets Alive & Parade Day (including Africa Day) African languages

1 June 2014 Campsie Food Festival Korean

13 June 2014 Supanova General

174 SBS Annual Report 2014

SBS Radio - FIFA World Cup Events

Date Competing Countries Broadcast Language Venue

26 May 2014 Australia South Africa English Sydney Olympic Park

13 June 2014 Brazil Croatia Portuguese Margaritaville, Darling Harbour

14 June 2014 Chile Australia Spanish Margaritaville, Darling Harbour

15 June 2014 Colombia Greece Greek Nugas Club, Hawthorn

15 June 2014 Colombia Greece Greek The Enmore Theatre

15 June 2014 England Italy Italian Italian Forum, Leichhardt

15 June 2014 Colombia Greece Greek Vanilla Bar, Oakleigh

17 June 2014 Germany Portugal German Hofbräuhaus, Melbourne

18 June 2014 Russia Korea Korean Hyundai Fan Park

18 June 2014 Russia Korea Korean Tosuga Restaurant, Homebush

20 June 2014 Japan Greece Greek Vanilla Bar, Oakleigh

21 June 2014 Italy Costa Rica Italian The Fraternity Club, Fairy Meadow

21 June 2014 Honduras Ecuador Spanish Hyundai Fan Park

21 June 2014 Italy Costa Rica Italian Italian Chef, South Yarra

22 June 2014 Argentina Iran Spanish The Roxy, Parramatta

22 June 2014 Argentina Iran Spanish Cheers Bar, Sydney

23 June 2014 Korea Algeria Korean Hyundai Fan Park

23 June 2014 USA Portugal Portuguese Canterbury Hurlstone Park RSL

24 June 2014 Australia Spain Spanish Margaritaville, Darling Harbour

24 June 2014 Croatia Mexico Croatian King Tom Club, Sydney

27 June 2014 Portugal Ghana Portuguese Copacabana International, Fitzroy

27 June 2014 USA Germany German Löwenbräu Keller, Sydney

27 June 2014 Korea Belgium Korean Hyundai Fan Park

28 June 2014 Brazil Chile Spanish Margaritaville, Darling Harbour

28 June 2014 Colombia Uruguay Spanish Margaritaville, Darling Harbour

29 June 2014 Netherlands Mexico Dutch Pyrmont Bridge Hotel

30 June 2014 Mexico Holland Dutch Portland Hotel, Melbourne

30 June 2014 Greece Costa Rica Greek Portland Hotel, Melbourne

175

Image credits Andrew Quilty (pages 6, 33, 43) Sam Whiteside - Voena (pages 31, 64) Giles Park (page 12) Francesca Rizzoli (page 63) Nicole England - Hassell (pages 52, 55, 57, 74)

This index is to assist readers locate the information required by the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 (CAC Act), the Special Broadcasting Service Act 1991 and other applicable legislation.

Topic Page

Enabling legislation 3

Responsible Minister 3

Charter 3

Letter to the Minister 4-5

Organisational Structure 8

Board of Directors 9-11

Strategic Plan 14-15

Audience research and feedback 51

Transmission coverage and quality 54-55

Revenue earned from advertising and sponsorship 66, 101

Advertisers and sponsors 161-171

Financial results 74-133

Portfolio Budget and Additional Estimates Statements 2013-14 68-69

Key activities and changes affecting the authority Nil

Signifi cant events under s. 15 CAC Act and s. 52 SBS Act Nil

Related entity transactions 70

Board sub-committees 71

Statement on governance 72

Indemnities and insurance premiums for offi cers 73

Obtaining information from subsidiaries N/A

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 73

Work Health and Safety Act 2011 73

Equal Employment Opportunity Act 1987 59

Ministerial directions 73

Amendments to the SBS Act Nil

Particulars of any gift, devise, or bequest accepted by SBS Nil

Judicial decisions and reviews by outside bodies Nil

Community Advisory Committee 62

In nde de ex x of off A Ann n u u ual Re e R po p rtt r R Req e ui u u re eme me ents s

176 SBS Annual Report 2014

Sovereign Silk is a premium coated paper certifi ed by the Forestry Stewardship Council (FSC). Sovereign Silk contains fi bres sourced only from responsible forestry practices.

Designed by precinct.com.au

SBS Sydney Postal Address Locked Bag 028, Crows Nest NSW 1585

Street Address 14 Herbert Street, Artarmon NSW 2064

Telephone 02 9430 2828 Facsimile 02 9430 3700

SBS Melbourne Postal Address PO Box 294, South Melbourne VIC 3205

Street Address Alfred Deakin Building Federation Square Cnr Flinders and Swanston Streets, Melbourne VIC 3000

Telephone 03 9349 2121 Facsimile 03 9349 2120

www.sbs.com.au

Special Broadcasting Service Corporation (SBS)—Report for 2013-14 (2024)
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